Panel I - The Politics of Migration: Problems, Principles and Policies

"Normative (B)Orders. Migration and Citizenship in a Time of Crisis" - 9th International Annual Conference

Thursday, November 24th 2016, 2:15 pm - 4:15 pm

In our research, we integrate empirical and normative analysis of social changes and conflicts that lead to the re-formation of normative orders on national and transnational scales. The current migration and refugee crisis is a case in point. In order to determine the responsibilities of states and other agents to offer solutions, guided by principles of justice or humanitarian moral considerations, we need a realistic picture of the sources and the many dimensions of the current crisis. The imperative of justice demands that we first do justice to the causes of  the many problems – faced by us and, in particular, by those who are forced to migrate. The contributors to this panel will present reflections on what “real realism” about migration means (Lea Ypi), the normative implications and social consequences of certain forms of labor migration such as “brain drain” (Eszter Kollár), and the “global mobility divide” established by certain visa policies (Steffen Mau and Jens Steffek). These different perspectives on important dimensions of the current crisis enable us to inquire into how the current and possible future migration regimes can be understood as “orders of justifi cation” addressed to and – ideally – constituted by those who are subject to these orders.

 

Chair: Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Director of the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders” and Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at the Goethe University Frankfurt.

CV
Rainer Forst is Professor of Political Theory and Philosophy at the Goethe University Frankfurt. He is Co-Director of both the Research Cluster on the ”Formation of Normative Orders”, and the Centre for Advanced Studies “Justitia Amplificata” and is a member of the Directorate of the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities in Bad Homburg. He has previously taught at the Free University Berlin, the New School for Social Research in New York and Dartmouth College. His work in moral and political philosophy focuses on questions of practical reason, justice and toleration; his major publications are Contexts of Justice (Suhrkamp 1994, Univ. of California Press 2002), Toleration in Conflict (Suhrkamp 2003, Cambridge UP 2013), The Right to Justification (Suhrkamp 2007, Columbia UP 2012), Justification and Critique (Suhrkamp 2011, Polity Press 2013), The Power of Tolerance (with W. Brown, Columbia UP 2014), Justice, Democracy and the Right to Justification (with Replies by Critics; Bloomsbury 2014) and Normativität und Macht (Suhrkamp 2015, Oxford UP, forthcoming). In 2012 he received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Price of the German Research Foundation. He is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, Associate Editor of Ethics, a member of the Executive Editorial Committee of Political Theory and serves on the boards of numerous other international journals. He is co-editor of the book series “Theorie und Gesellschaft” and “Normative Orders” (Campus).

 

Chair: Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Director of the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders” and Professor of Legal Theory, Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure in the Faculty of Law at the Goethe University Frankfurt.

CV
Klaus Günther, born in 1957, is Professor of Legal Theory, Criminal Law and Law of Criminal Procedure in the Faculty of Law at the Goethe University Frankfurt. Since 2007 he has been Co-Director of the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”. He is a member of the board of directors of the Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt and Permanent Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities of the Goethe University in Bad Homburg. Klaus Günther studied philosophy and law in Frankfurt. From 1983 to 1996 he was a research assistant and university assistant in Frankfurt in, inter alia, a DFG-funded legal theory working group (Leibniz-Programme) with Jürgen Habermas, where he received his doctorate in 1987. His habilitation in 1997 was followed by appointments to professorships at the EUI Florence and at the universities of Rostock and Zurich, which he declined. Guest professor at SUNY at Buffalo (2000), Corpus Christi College Oxford (2001), École des Hautes Études en Sciences Soziales (2003), London School of Economics (2003) and Sciences Po (2016). His  most important publications include: "Der Sinn für Angemessenheit" (1988; English translation: "The sense of Appropriateness", 1993; Portuguese translation 2004) and "Schuld und kommunikative Freiheit" (2005). He is co-editor of the book series “Normative Orders“ (Campus).

 

Lecture 1
Prof. Dr. Steffen Mau
(Professor of Macrosociology at Humboldt University of Berlin) & Prof. Dr. Jens Steffek (Professor of Transnational Governance at Technische Universität Darmstadt and Principal Investigator at the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”)

Exploring the Global Mobility Divide: the Case of Visa Waiver Policies

Abstract
Political theorists and practitioners alike are discussing freedom of movement extensively and controversially. At the same time, we are still lacking profound empirical knowledge on that issue. Visa policies are the major instrument for regulating and controlling the global flow of people. They represent a form of exterritorialization of political control, which allows states to exercise it far beyond their own borders. With increasing migration flows, it makes sense to assume that their function of filtering wanted and unwanted types of travellers has gained importance over time. On the basis of a large comparative data set we explore changing visa relations at the global level. We demonstrate the emergence of a global mobility divide, marked by increasing mobility for some people while others are immobilized. Moreover, we will look at the issue of reciprocity as a key principle of international relations. We seek to answer the question under which conditions reciprocity in visa relations prevails and which countries are able to establish asymmetrical visa relationships to their own advantage.

CV
Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at Humboldt University of Berlin. Before coming to Berlin he was Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bremen. He received his PhD from the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence. His areas of interest are social  inequality, migration, border studies and comparative social policy. Recent publications are Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class. Why did the European Middle Classes accept Neoliberalism? Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (2015); Liberal States and the Freedom of Movement. Selective Borders, Unequal Mobility. Basingstoke: Palgrave (with Heike Brabandt/Lena Laube/Christof Roos, 2012); (Un-)gerechte (Un-)gleichheiten. Berlin: edition suhrkamp (eds. with Nadine M. Schöneck, 2015).

CV
Jens Steffek (*1972) is Professor of Transnational Governance at Technische Universität Darmstadt and Principal Investigator at the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”. He holds an MA degree in political science from the University of Munich (1998) and a  doctorate from the European University Institute (2002). Before coming to Darmstadt he worked at the University of Bremen, Jacobs University and the Robert-Schuman-Centre for Advanced Studies. He was visiting professor at the University of Pavia, LUISS Guido Carli (Rome) and the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law at Heidelberg, as well as a visiting research fellow at the University of Cambridge, the University of Montréal and the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB). His research interests include international  relations (in particular the study of international organizations), international law and international political theory. Jens Steffek has published six books and some 50 journal articles and book chapters. He contributed, inter alia, to the European Journal of International Relations,  Ethics & International Affairs, International Relations, International Theory, Millennium and Review of International Studies.

 

Lecture 2
Dr. Eszter Kollár
(Researcher and Lecturer at the Chair of International Political Theory, Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders“, Goethe University Frankfurt)

Fairness in Labour Migration: A Radical Liberal Egalitarian Proposal

Abstract
A liberal political theory of labour migration faces a serious dilemma. It takes the inequality generating effects of international brain drain to be morally objectionable, but cannot (directly) restrict the movement or occupational choice of labour migrants as a solution. I argue that a plausible solution can be found by rethinking a basic tenet of liberal political theory. Namely, its ownership of talents thesis, according to which talents fall under self-ownership, but the benefits derived from the use of talents are legitimately owned against the background of fair cooperation. I argue for radical liberal egalitarian  view about the ownership of talents that takes the moral ownership of cultivated skills to be conditional on fair opportunity for human development for all. Rethinking fairness in labour migration on the basis of this radical view takes the following form. Labour migration is currently driven by the immigration policies of affl uent states, aiming to fix their demographic and professional shortages and to gain competitive advantage in the global knowledge economy. It is yet unclear which normative ideas should guide a fair multilateral global governance of labor migration. I argue that in a globalized world of  production and trade, labour migration creates an extra burden of justification across borders concerning fair conditions for cultivating skills and rightful ownership of the social benefits. I conclude that a well-designed international brain drain tax and other types of in-kind (knowledge and skills) transfer and service schemes constitute fair terms of labour migration. The function of these normative constraints is to render the gains morally justified, and thereby normatively reorder rightful ownership in the global economy.

CV
Eszter Kollár is a Researcher and Lecturer at the Chair of International Political Theory, Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders“, Goethe University Frankfurt. Her research in social and political philosophy focuses on the problem of fairness in labour migration, on reconciling global equality of opportunity and collective self-determination, and on rethinking relational egalitarianism in practice. She studied sociology and political science in Budapest, and wrote her dissertation on “Global distributive justice between justification and feasibility” at the Luiss University of Rome, at the University of Pennsylvania, and at the Australian National University. She then held postdoctoral fellowships at the Hoover Chair in Economic and Social Ethics, CU Louvain, and at the Centre for Advanced Studies in Bioethics, University of Münster. Her most recent work is published in Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, Journal of Applied Philosophy, Journal of Medical Ethics, Bioethics, and she is the editor of the 2016/1 issue of Moral Philosophy and Politics on “Brain Drain and Emigration”. She is an organizing member of the Global Justice Network committed to bridging the gap between the theory and practice of global justice (http://www.theglobaljusticenetwork.org).

 

Lecture 3
Prof. Dr. Lea Ypi
(Professor in Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at the Australian National University)

Real Realism on Migration

Abstract
This paper addresses some of the core claims that advocates of realism about migration tend to make when reflecting on the confl icts that the movement of people across borders poses for contemporary liberal democracies. I argue that migration poses serious questions of justice but that such questions ought to be examined in the context of a larger analysis of capitalist injustice, the historical context of its production and the agents responsible for and affected by it. If we isolate the discussion of migration related problems and ground it on an abstract analysis of human rights to freedom of movement, morality of border controls or humanitarian compassion towards vulnerable people, we end up depriving ourselves of the most effective tools for identifying a remedy to them.

CV
Lea Ypi is Professor in Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at the Australian National University. She is interested in issues of global justice (including migration and colonialism), democratic theory (with particular focus on parties) and the philosophy of the Enlightenment (especially Kant). She is the author of Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency (OUP 2012) and, with Jonathan White, The Meaning of Partisanship (OUP 2016). She has edited Migration in Political Theory (OUP 2016, with Sarah Fine) and Kant and Colonialism (OUP 2015, with Katrin Flikschuh). Her articles have appeared in Philosophy and Public Affairs, The American Political Science Review, The Journal of Political Philosophy, Political Theory and others. Last year she was the recipient of the British Academy Brian Barry Prize for Excellence in Political Science and her article “What’s wrong with colonialism” was selected by The Philosopher’s Annual as one of the ten best published in philosophy.

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Jens Steffek (Professor of Transnational Governance at Technische Universität Darmstadt and Principal Investigator at the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”)
  • Prof. Dr. Steffen Mau (Professor of Macrosociology at Humboldt University of Berlin)
  • Prof. Dr. Steffen Mau (Professor of Macrosociology at Humboldt University of Berlin)
  • Dr. Eszter Kollár (Researcher and Lecturer at the Chair of International Political Theory, Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders“, Goethe University Frankfurt)
  • Prof. Dr. Lea Ypi (Professor in Political Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at the Australian National University)
  • Prof. Dr. Leo Lucassen (Research Director of the International Institute of Social History (IISH) in Amsterdam and part time professor of Global Labour and Migration History at the Institute of History of Leiden University)

 

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Campus Westend
Max-Horkheimer-Str. 2
Gebäude "Normative Ordnungen", EG 01 und EG 02

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"


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