Ringvorlesungen

Algorithm Watch - Von A wie Accountability bis Z wie Zertifizierung: Kann und sollte eine zivilgesellschaftliche Kontroll-Organisation zu mehr Vertrauen beim Einsatz von Systemen zum automatisierten Entscheiden beitragen?

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Thursday, 10 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST

Matthias Spielkamp (Algorithm Watch)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

The Freedom to Deviate in the Algorithmic Society?

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Wednesday, 23 June 2021, 18.00-20.00 CEST

Virtual Roundtable

With: Lucia Zedner (Oxford, All Souls College, Professor of Criminal Justice)
Bernard Harcourt (Columbia Law School, Professor of Law and of Political Science)
Frank Pasquale (Brooklyn Law School, Professor of Law)
Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice etc.)
Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law etc.)
Jürgen Kaube (Co-Editor at Large, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

„Kontrolle trotz(t) Komplexität“: Wie Datenschüzer ihre unlösbare Aufgabe bewältigen

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Tuesday, 15 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST

Dr. Stefan Brink (Landesbeauftragter für den Datenschutz, Baden-Württemberg)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

Das vermessene Leben

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Monday 14 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST

Prof. Dr. Vera King (Professorin für Soziologie und psychoanalytische Sozialpsychologie an der Goethe-Universität und geschäftsführende Direktorin des Sigmund-Freud-Instituts Frankfurt, PI von ConTrust)
Ringvorlesung "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control"

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

„Recommended for You“: Das Informationsproblem in Märkten für Kulturgüter und die Kontrollfunktion von Empfehlungsalgorithmen

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Wednesday, 19 May 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST

Vinzenz Hediger (Goethe University, Professor of Cinema Studies, PI of Contrust)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

From Eugenics to Big Data: A Genealogy of Criminal Risk Assessment in American Law and Policy

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Wednesday, 5 May 2021, 18.00-20.00 CEST

Prof. Jonathan Simon (Professor of Criminal Justice Law, UC Berkeley)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

For further information: Click here... 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

Never apologise, never explain: (How) can AI rebuild trust after conflicts?

Digital Lecture Series "Algorithms - Between Trust and Control" Summer Term 2021

Thursday, 22 April 2021, 18.00-20.00 CEST

Prof. Burkhard Schäfer (University of Edinburgh, Professor of Computational Legal Theory)

Opening Remarks by Prof. Enrico Schleiff (President of Goethe University)
Opening Remarks by Prof. Rainer Forst (Speaker of ConTrust and Normative Orders)
Welcoming Remarks & Comment Prof. Klaus Günther (Dean of the Faculty of Law Goethe University)

Convenors: Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Video:

 

For further information: Click here... 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

Algorithms - Between Trust and Control

Digital Lecture Series Summer Term 2021

Convenors: Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice, PI of ConTrust and "Normative Orders") and Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law, PI of ConTrust)

Algorithms – and the actors behind them – are surveying and impacting ever more dimensions of our modern lives. They recommend which movies to watch; they calculate risk appropriate credit scores; and they play a role in meting out “just” punishment; to only name a few areas. At the same time, they correct imperfect human decisions and add new informational dimensions to decisions prior  impossible. To assess and evaluate the impeding transformations of normative orders in a predictive society, we approach algorithms in light of the juxtaposition of trust and control. Why and under which conditions do – or don’t – we trust algorithms? Indeed, can and should we trust them? Especially because their algorithmic normativity was (not) produced in justificatory fora where trust is brought about in and through social conflicts? But then, how much trust – if any – should algorithms put into us as citizens? For example, do they have to presume us non-dangerous and harmless? Vice versa, how much control do we need to retain over algorithms? And how much control should they exert over us? Can we use algorithms to control the effect of algorithms and thus create a meta-level of trust? Especially in order to negate, or as a matter of fact: to entertain, the freedom to deviate in the algorithmic society? These are but a few of the questions that internationally renowned speakers raise in “Algorithms between Trust and Control”, a lecture series convened by Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann and Christoph Burchard, and co-organized by the research clusters ConTrust, Normative Orders and ZEVEDI in the line of the Frankfurt Talks on Information Law and under the auspices of Goethe University Frankfurt am Main.

The lectures will take place via Zoom. Please register at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to receive the login data.

Poster and Programme (pdf): Click here...

To download the ics file with all dates: Click here...

Programme:

Thursday, 22 April 2021, 18.00-20.00 CEST
Never apologise, never explain: (How) can AI rebuild trust after conflicts?
Burkhart Schäfer (University of Edinburgh, Professor of Computational Legal Theory)

Opening Remarks by Prof. Enrico Schleiff (President of Goethe University)
Opening Remarks by Prof. Rainer Forst (Speaker of ConTrust and Normative Orders)
Welcoming Remarks & Comment Prof. Klaus Günther (Dean of the Faculty of Law Goethe University)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Wednesday, 5 May 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
From Eugenics to Big Data: A Genealogy of Criminal Risk Assessment in American Law and Policy
Jonathan Simon (UC Berkeley, Professor of Criminal Justice Law)

For further information (Video): Click here..

Wednesday, 19 May 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
„Recommended for You“: Das Informationsproblem in Märkten für Kulturgüter und die Kontrollfunktion von Empfehlungsalgorithmen
Vinzenz Hediger (Goethe University, Professor of Cinema Studies, PI of Contrust)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Thursday, 27 May 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
Zahlen lügen nicht? - Von trügerischer Objektivität und historic bias bei algorithmenbasiertem Kreditscoring
Katja Langenbucher (Goethe University, Professor of Civil Law, Commercial Law and Banking Law)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Thursday, 10 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
Algorithm Watch - Von A wie Accountability bis Z wie Zertifizierung: Kann und sollte eine zivilgesellschaftliche Kontroll-Organisation zu mehr Vertrauen beim Einsatz von Systemen zum automatisierten Entscheiden beitragen?
Matthias Spielkamp (Algorithm Watch)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Monday, 14 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
Das vermessene Leben
Vera King (Goethe University, Professor of Sociology and Social Psychology, Managing Director of the Sigmund-Freud-Institut; PI of ConTrust)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Tuesday, 15 June 2021, 18.00-19.30 CEST
„Kontrolle trotz(t) Komplexität“: Wie Datenschüzer ihre unlösbare Aufgabe bewältigen
Stefan Brink (Landesbeauftragter für den Datenschutz, Baden-Württemberg)

For further information (Video): Click here...

Wednesday, 23 June 2021, 18.00-20.00 CEST
Virtual Roundtable
The Freedom to Deviate in the Algorithmic Society?
Lucia Zedner (Oxford, All Souls College, Professor of Criminal Justice)
Bernard Harcourt (Columbia Law School, Professor of Law and of Political Science)
Frank Pasquale (Brooklyn Law School, Professor of Law)
Christoph Burchard (Goethe University, Professor of Criminal Justice etc.)
Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe University, Professor of Public Law etc.)
Jürgen Kaube (Co-Editor at Large, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

For further information (Video): Click here...

 

Presented by:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, "ConTrust" - ein Clusterprojekt des Landes Hessen, Frankfurter Gespräche zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und Zentrum verantwortungsbewusste Digitalisierung

Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen – ein Thema für Datenschutz und Antidiskriminierungsrecht?

Mittwoch, 3. Februar 2021, 18.00 Uhr

Prof. Dr. Antje von Ungern-Sternberg (Universität Trier)

Begrüßung: Prof. Dr. Roland Broemel (Professor für Öffentliches Recht, Wirtschafts- und Währungsrecht, Finanzmarktregulierung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Online via Zoom. Eine Anmeldung an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ist erforderlich. Die Logindaten werden nach Anmeldung übermittelt.

Weitere Informationen und Programm: Hier...

Video:

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsnetzwerk „Die normative Ordnung künstlicher Intelligenz | NO:KI" am Forschungsverbund „Normative Ordnungen“ gemeinsam mit den Frankfurter Gesprächen zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und dem Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Haftung für Künstliche Intelligenz – droht ein Verantwortungsvakuum?

Montag, 25. Januar 2021, 18.00 Uhr

Prof. Christiane Wendehorst (Universität Wien)

Online via Zoom. Eine Anmeldung an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ist erforderlich. Die Logindaten werden nach Anmeldung übermittelt.

Weitere Informationen und Programm: Hier...

Video:

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsnetzwerk „Die normative Ordnung künstlicher Intelligenz | NO:KI" am Forschungsverbund „Normative Ordnungen“ gemeinsam mit den Frankfurter Gesprächen zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und dem Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Gesellschaft als digitale Sozialmaschine? Zur soziotechnischen Transformation des selbstbestimmten Lebens

Ringvorlesung Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen und KI

Mittwoch, 16. Dezember 2020, 18.00 Uhr

Prof. Jörn Lamla (Universität Kassel)

Begrüßung:  Prof. Dr. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Online via Zoom. Eine Anmeldung an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ist erforderlich. Die Logindaten werden nach Anmeldung übermittelt.

Weitere Informationen und Programm: Hier...

Video:

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsnetzwerk „Die normative Ordnung künstlicher Intelligenz | NO:KI" am Forschungsverbund „Normative Ordnungen“ gemeinsam mit den Frankfurter Gesprächen zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und dem Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Legal effect in computational ‘law’

Ringvorlesung Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen und KI

Mittwoch, 11. November 2020, 18.00 Uhr

Prof. Mireille Hildebrandt (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Begrüßung: Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Forschungsverbund "Normative Orders"), Prof. Birgitta Wolff (Präsidentin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main), Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther (Dekan des Fachbereichs Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Forschungsverbund "Normative Orders"), Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst (Co-Sprecher des Forschungsverbunds "Normative Orders") und Prof. Dr. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Online via Zoom. Eine Anmeldung an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ist erforderlich. Die Logindaten werden nach Anmeldung übermittelt.

Weitere Informationen und Programm: Hier...

Video:

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsnetzwerk „Die normative Ordnung künstlicher Intelligenz | NO:KI" am Forschungsverbund „Normative Ordnungen“ gemeinsam mit den Frankfurter Gesprächen zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und dem Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen und KI

Ringvorlesung

Algorithmen und die automatisierte Auswertung großer Datenmengen (Big Data) verändern gesellschaftliche Strukturen und ökonomische Geschäftsmodelle. Schlagwortartige Beispiele reichen von sozialen Netzwerken und Suchmaschinen über die sog. Industrie 4.0, das predictive policing, die medizinische Forschung bis hin zum Versicherungs- und Finanzmarktsektor (FinTech). Als Kehrseite birgt dieses innovative, aus statistischen Wahrscheinlichkeiten generierte Wissen nicht nur Risiken von Verzerrungen und Diskriminierungen, sondern begünstigt auch eine Konzentration gesellschaftlicher und ökonomischer Macht. Der Zugang zu Daten und die Analysekompetenz prägen das Gestaltungspotential bestimmter Akteure, insbesondere von Plattformbetreibern. Im Anschluss an eine Einführung in die technischen Grundlagen erörtert die Ringvorlesung die gesellschaftlichen Auswirkungen aus soziologischer Perspektive und diskutiert Optionen rechtlicher Regulierung.

Convenors: Prof. Roland Broemel (Goethe-Universität), Prof. Christoph Burchard (Goethe-Universität, „Normative Orders“), Prof. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe-Universität)

Online via Zoom. Eine Anmeldung an This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ist erforderlich. Die Logindaten werden nach Anmeldung übermittelt.

Programm

11. November 2020, 18.00 Uhr
Legal effect in computational ‘law’
Prof. Mireille Hildebrandt (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Begrüßung: Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Forschungsverbund "Normative Orders"), Prof. Birgitta Wolff (Präsidentin der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main), Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther (Dekan des Fachbereichs Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Forschungsverbund "Normative Orders"), Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst (Co-Sprecher des Forschungsverbunds "Normative Orders") und Prof. Dr. Indra Spiecker gen. Döhmann (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Weitere Informationen (Videoaufzeichnung): Hier...

23. November 2020, 18.00 Uhr
Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen – computerwissenschaftliche Perspektiven
Prof. Kristian Kersting (Technische Universität Darmstadt)
 
16. Dezember 2020, 18.00 Uhr
Gesellschaft als digitale Sozialmaschine? Zur soziotechnischen Transformation des selbstbestimmten Lebens
Prof. Jörn Lamla (Universität Kassel)

Weitere Informationen (Videoaufzeichnung): Hier...

25. Januar 2021, 18.00 Uhr
Haftung für Künstliche Intelligenz – droht ein Verantwortungsvakuum?
Prof. Christiane Wendehorst (Universität Wien)

Weitere Informationen (Videoaufzeichnung): Hier...

3. Februar 2021, 18.00 Uhr
Machtverschiebung durch Algorithmen – ein Thema für Datenschutz und Antidiskriminierungsrecht?
Prof. Antje von Ungern-Sternberg (Universität Trier)

Weitere Informationen (Videoaufzeichnung): Hier...

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsnetzwerk „Die normative Ordnung künstlicher Intelligenz | NO:KI" am Forschungsverbund „Normative Ordnungen“ gemeinsam mit den Frankfurter Gesprächen zum Informationsrecht des Lehrstuhls für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht, Informationsrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften und dem Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Die Politische Theorie des Neoliberalismus und die Zukunft Europas

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt / Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")

Mittwoch, 29. Mai 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

 
PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher studierte an der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität in Freiburg und der Queen's University in Kingston/Kanada Wissenschaftliche Politik, Wirtschaftspolitik und Öffentliches Recht. Nach seinem Magisterabschluss 2000 promovierte er sich 2003 ebenfalls in Freiburg mit einer Dissertation, die unter dem dem Titel 'Selbstkritik der Moderne. Habermas und Foucault im Vergleich' im Campus Verlag 2005 veröffentlicht wurde. Von 2003 bis 2009 war er als DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor am Department of Political Science der University of Florida in Gainesville tätig. Von 2009 bis 2012 leitete er am Exzellenzcluster eine Nachwuchsforschungsgruppe zum Thema 'Krise und normative Ordnung - Variationen des Neoliberalismus und ihre Transformation'. 2012 und 2013 vertrat er die Professuren für Politische Theorie und Philosophie sowie Internationale Politische Theorie am Exzellenzcluster. Im Winter Term 2014 war er als DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor am Institute for European Studies der University of British Columbia in Vancouver tätig. Von 2014 bis 2017 vertrat er die Professur für politische Theorie und Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität. Im Moment ist er Postdoktorand am Exzellenzcluster.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“), PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Demokratisierung der Demokratie, Entdemokratisierung der Demokratie

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Philip Manow (Universität Bremen)

Mittwoch, 17. Juli 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Der Vortrag entwickelt die These, dass wir momentan mit der widersprüchlichen Gleichzeitigkeit, aber auch mit dem latenten Zusammenhang zweier Prozesse konfrontiert sind, die Demokratisierung der Demokratie und Ent-Demokratisierung der Demokratie genannt werden sollen. Was den ersten der beiden Prozesse angeht, so zeigt sich vor dem Hintergrund der historischen Rekonstruktion, wie um 1900 ,Pöbel‘ und ,Volk‘ auseinandertraten und das letztere in die Repräsentation eingeschlossen, und der erstere von der Repräsentation ausgeschlossen wurde, dass wir momentan mit einer Öffnung der Demokratie hin zu diesen zuvor ausgeschlossenen ,pöbelhaften‘ Elementen konfrontiert sind. Soweit dieser Prozess, zweitens, als Gefährdung der repräsentativen Demokratie gewertet wird, transformiert das den Streit ,in’ der Demokratie zu einem Streit ,über‘ die Demokratie. Aber dieser Diskurs über die Gefährdung der Demokratie gefährdet zugleich die Demokratie, weil eben die normalen  Funktionslogiken demokratischen Wettbewerbs dadurch ausgeschlossen werden.

CV
Prof. Dr. Philip Manow ist seit 2010 Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen. Nachdem er im Jahr 2002 an der Universität Konstanz habilitiert wurde, leitete er die Forschungsgruppe Politik und politische Ökonomie am Max-Planck-Institut für  Gesellschaftsforschung in Köln, bevor er 2006 eine Professur für Politik- und Verwaltungswissenschaft in Konstanz und dann 2009 eine Professur für Moderne Politische Theorie an der Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg übernahm. Zuletzt gab er gemeinsam mit Bruno Palier und Hanna Schwander Welfare democracies and party politics: Explaining electoral dynamics in times of changing welfare capitalism heraus, das 2018 bei Oxford University Press erschien. Ebenfalls 2018 erschien sein vielbeachtetes Buch Die Politische Ökonomie des Populismus bei Suhrkamp.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Philip Manow (Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen)
  • Prof. Dr. Philip Manow (Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen)
  • Prof. Dr. Philip Manow (Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen)
  • Prof. Dr. Philip Manow (Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen)
  • Prof. Dr. Philip Manow (Professor für Vergleichende Politische Ökonomie am Zentrum für Sozialpolitik der Universität Bremen)

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Ungleichheit und der Verlust demokratischer Visionen

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Regina Kreide (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)

Mittwoch, 10. Juli 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Wir leben in einer ,Abstiegsgesellschaft‘ (Oliver Nachtwey). Die ,soziale Moderne‘ mit ihren Standard-Erwerbsverhältnissen, einer wachsenden Wirtschaft und einer starken demokratischen Basis, die die Ära von der Nachkriegszeit bis Ende der 1970er Jahre kennzeichnete, ist durch eine ,regressive Moderne‘ ersetzt worden, die hinter die schon erreichten Standards sozialer Integration zurückfällt. Europäische Gesellschaften sind derzeit geprägt von Polarisierungen, Post-Demokratie und zunehmender ökonomischer Ungleichheit. Paradoxerweise geht die ökonomische Ungleichheit mit einer zunehmenden Akzeptanz und institutionellen Anerkennung von Identitätspolitik einher. Ökonomische Gleichheit hat abgenommen, aber Gleichheit im Hinblick auf Geschlecht, sexuelle und ethnische Unterschiede erhält wesentlich mehr Aufmerksamkeit auf den politischen Agenden. Diese enge Verknüpfung zwischen ökonomischer Integration und Identitätspolitik, so das Argument der Vorlesung, ist unzureichend; stattdessen bedarf es einer differenziellen Analyse, die auch die Bedeutung politischer Integration mit einbezieht. Der Grund, warum Menschen nicht wählen gehen, öffentlich protestieren oder ihre
Stimme extremistischen Parteien geben, kann weder allein auf ökonomische, noch auf kulturelle Aspekte reduziert werden. Die Gründe finden sich vielmehr im ökonomischen und politischen System selbst.

CV
Regina Kreide ist Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen. Sie ist Mitbegründerin und Herausgeberin
der Zeitschrift für Menschenrechte und seit 2014 eine der Sprecher des SFBs 138 „Dynamiken der Sicherheit“ sowie Teilprojektleiterin des Projektes „Die Herausbildung der Roma-Minderheiten in Europa“. Zu ihren Arbeitsgebieten gehören globale (Un-)Gerechtigkeit, Demokratie, Widerstand, Menschenrechte, Gender- und Rassismus-Studies, Sicherheit und Versicherheitlichung. Wichtige Veröffentlichungen sind Globale Politik und Menschenrechte. Macht und
Ohnmacht eines politischen Instruments, 2008; das Habermas-Handbuch, 2009 (mit H. Brunkhorst, C. Lafont), Transformations of Democracy: Crisis, Protest, and Legitimation, mit R. Celikates, T. Wesche (2015); Die verdrängte Demokratie. Essays zur politischen Theorie, 2016 (Nomos); The Securitization of the Roma in Europe, herausgegeben mit Huub van Baar, Huub und Ana Ivasiuc, bei Palgrave 2019; Was ist globale (Un)gerechtigkeit? erscheint im Sommer 2019 bei Alber Verlag.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen) und Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Menke (Professor für Praktische Philosophie mit Schwerpunkt Politische Philosophie und Rechtsphilosophie und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Dr. Eva Buddeberg (Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Institut für Politikwissenschaft an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und Assoziiertes Mitglied des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Regina Kreide (Professorin für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen) und Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Rethinking Democratic Athens and Republican Rome in an Age of Plutocracy and Populism

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. John P. McCormick (University of Chicago)

Mittwoch, 26. Juni 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Two ancient polities, Athenian democracy and the Roman republic, figure prominently in debates over the contemporary crisis of “liberal,” “electoral” or “representative” democracy. Democratic Athens and republican Rome are often invoked as models to be imitated or avoided in efforts to address rising political inequality and rampant political corruption in our plutocratic age. I criticize recent books by Philip Pettit, Nadia Urbinati and Josiah Ober that evaluate majoritarian and populist solutions, inspired by Athenian or Roman politics, to address the contemporary crisis of democracy. In response, I advocate classspecific or randomly distributed political offices, citizen referenda, and popularly judged political trials as ancient-inspired reforms intended to address the problems of unaccountable and unresponsive elites, socio-economic inequality and political corruption that plague contemporary democracies.

CV
John P. McCormick is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Carl Schmitt’s Critique of Liberalism: Against Politics as Technology (Cambridge University Press, 1997); Weber, Habermas and Transformations of the European State: On Constitutional, Social and Supranational Democracy (Cambridge University Press, 2007); Machiavellian Democracy (Cambridge University Press, 2011); and Reading Machiavelli (Princeton 2018). Professor McCormick has received the following fellowships: Fulbright Scholarship, the Center for European Law & Politics, the University of Bremen in Germany (1994 – 95); Jean Monnet Fellowship, the European University Institute in Florence, Italy (1995 – 96); Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship, Harvard University (2008 – 09); Rockefeller Foundation Resident Fellowship, Bellagio, Italy (2013); and National Endowment for the Humanities Grant (2017 – 18).

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)
  • Prof. John P. McCormick (Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago)

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Entzivilisierung – über Regressionen in westlichen Demokratien

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Universität Basel)

Mittwoch, 5. Juni 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Westliche Gesellschaften beschreiben sich als Gesellschaften der Selbstkontrolle, in denen die Kräfte des sozialen Fortschritts zu Hause sind, die Aufklärung, die Gleichberechtigung und soziale Integration voranbringen. Aber etwas ist in diesen Gesellschaften ins Rutschen gekommen. Sie werden in ihrem Selbstbild erschüttert, erfahren sie doch lange nicht gekannte Prozesse der Entzivilisierung. In die politische Öffentlichkeit ist etwas Rohes eingezogen, gefährliche Gefühle wie Gewaltphantasien, ja sogar Tötungswünsche werden schamlos artikuliert, die Affektkontrolle verwildert an vielen Stellen: im
Internet, auf der Straße, im Alltagshandeln, im Wahlverhalten. Paradoxerweise ist die laufende Regression eine Nebenfolge gesellschaftlicher Fortschritte. Denn die spezifische Kombination aus Fortschritt
und Rückschritt – eine regressive Modernisierung – hat normative Krisen und vermeintliche Verlierer produziert, die sich in entzivilisierende Affekte flüchten.

CV
Oliver Nachtwey ist Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse. Er hat an der Universität Hamburg Volkswirtschaftslehre studiert und wurde 2008 an der Universität Göttingen mit einer Arbeit in politischer Soziologie promoviert. Anschließend war er als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an den Universitäten Jena, Trier und Darmstadt tätig. Er war Fellow am Hamburger Institut für Sozialforschung, dem Kolleg Postwachstum in Jena sowie am Institut für Sozialforschung Frankfurt.
Professor Nachtwey forscht zum Wandel der Arbeit und der gesellschaftlichen Modernisierung und ihrem Einfluss auf die Sozialstruktur. Ferner beschäftigt er sich mit dem Wandel politischer Repräsentation, Protesten und sozialen Bewegungen. In seiner jüngeren Forschung fokussiert er insbesondere auf die  gesellschaftlichen Auswirkungen der Digitalisierung. Für sein Buch Die Abstiegsgesellschaft. Über das Aufbegehren in der regressiven Moderne erhielt Professor Nachtwey mehrere Preise. Seine Bücher und Aufsätze werden in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzt.

Bildergalerie:

  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)
  • Prof. Oliver Nachtwey (Professor für Sozialstrukturanalyse an der Universität Basel)

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Europa als Republik? Von der Gemeinschaft der Nationalstaaten zu einer echten europäischen Demokratie

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Ulrike Guérot (Donau-Universität Krems)

Mittwoch, 29. Mai 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Der Glaube an Europa, das ist zurzeit eine Wette mit hohem Einsatz. Die Europäische Union ist in ihrem jetzigen Zustand so gut wie nicht mehr zu halten, und die europäische Bevölkerung ahnt das. Die
eine Hälfte der Bürger will zurück in den Nationalismus; die andere Hälfte will mehr Europa, ein anderes, soziales, und demokratisches Europa, und will sich nicht mit einer verlorenen Wette zufriedengeben.
Der Vortrag skizziert einen möglichen Ausweg aus diesem Dilemma: die Europäische Republik. Die Idee der Republik ist von Aristoteles bis Kant ein gängiges Verfassungsprinzip für politische Gemeinwesen.
Die Europäische Republik ist die Idee, den allgemeinen politischen Gleichheitsgrundsatz für Europa anzuwenden. Denn momentan, in der EU als Rechtsgemeinschaft, sind zwar das Ölkännchen und die Glühbirne gleich unter EU-Recht, nicht aber die Bürgerinnen und Bürger Europas, die als eigentlicher Souverän in „nationale Rechtscontainer“ eingeteilt sind.

CV
Prof. Dr. Ulrike Guérot ist seit 2016 Professorin an der Donau-Universität Krems und Leiterin des dortigen Departments für Europapolitik und  Demokratieforschung. Zudem ist sie Gründerin des European Democracy Labs in Berlin. Zuvor arbeitete sie in europäischen Think Tanks und Universitäten in Paris, Brüssel, London, Washington und Berlin. Ihre Bücher Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! Eine politische Utopie (2016 Dietz) und Der Europäische Bürgerkrieg – Das offene Europa und seine Feinde (2017 Ullstein) wurden in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzt. Ihr aktuelles Werk Wie hältst du‘s mit Europa? erschien im März 2019 im Steidl Verlag.

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Immigration and Nationalism

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Michael Walzer (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ)

Dienstag, 28. Mai 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
In my talk I would like to address two questions: first, what are the legitimate limits that countries can set on the number of people they take in? And second, who are the people whom we are obligated to take in? Among the latter, I will talk about various categories from ethnic and ideological kinfolk to asylum seekers, and refugees. While I do not principally advocate a policy of open borders for reasons I will explain, right now, in my own country, the United States, I am an advocate for people trying to come in.

CV
Professor Emeritus of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ. As a professor, author, editor, and lecturer, Michael Walzer has addressed a wide variety of topics in political theory and moral philosophy: political obligation, just and unjust war, nationalism and ethnicity, economic justice and the welfare state. His books (among them Just and Unjust Wars, Spheres of Justice, The Company of Critics, Thick and Thin: Moral Argument at Home and Abroad, On Toleration, and Politics and Passion) and essays have played a part in the revival of practical, issue-focused ethics and in the development of a pluralist approach to political and moral life. For more than three decades Walzer served as co-editor of Dissent, now in its 64th year. His articles and interviews appear frequently in the world’s foremost newspapers and journals. He is currently working on the fourth volume of The Jewish Political Tradition, a comprehensive collaborative
project focused on the history of Jewish political thought. His book The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions, was  published in March of 2015, and A Foreign Policy for the Left was published in 2018.

Video:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Michael Walzer (Professor Emeritus of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ)
  • Prof. Michael Walzer (Professor Emeritus of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Prof. Michael Walzer (Professor Emeritus of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ)
  • Prof. Michael Walzer (Professor Emeritus of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ)

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

„Die verbindende Kraft alles Rechts …“ Was bleibt vom revolutionären Verständnis der Rechte?

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz"

Prof. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Universität Rennes)

Mittwoch, 8. Mai 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 6

Abstract
Die Besonderheit der modernen Demokratie liegt in ihrer Assoziation mit einer völlig neuen Auffassung der normativen Grundlagen der individuellen Rechte. Diese spezifisch moderne Konzeption, wie sie in der Erklärung der Menschen- und Bürgerrechte von 1789 zu lesen ist, wurde auf philosophischer Ebene von Immanuel Kant erläutert. Sie impliziert eine klare Unterscheidung zwischen politischen Rechten im engeren Sinne und dem paternalistisch begründeten Schutz von Bürgern und Schutzgenossen. Kants Kritik an der „väterliche[n] Regierung (imperium paternale), wo also die Untertanen als unmündige Kinder, die nicht unterscheiden können, was ihnen wahrhaftig nützlich oder schädlich ist, sich bloß passiv zu verhalten genötigt sind“, beruht auf dieser Unterscheidung. Das Vergessen und Verschwinden dieser Unterscheidung ist ein beunruhigender Aspekt der Erosion des demokratischen Ethos in den heutigen westlichen Gesellschaften. Diese Erosion wird in diesem Vortrag am Beispiel der jüngsten Gesetzesreformen in Frankreich im Bereich des Arbeitsrechts und der bürgerlichen Freiheiten illustriert.

CV
Catherine Colliot-Thélène ist emeritierte Professorin an der Universität Rennes 1. Von 1999 bis 2004 war sie Direktorin des Centre Marc Bloch in Berlin; danach Gastwissenschaftlerin am Hamburger Institut für Sozialforschung (2008), am Max Weber-Kolleg in Erfurt (2013) und am Institut für Sozialforschung in Frankfurt am Main (2015). Sie hat mehrere Bücher dem Werk von Max Weber gewidmet und diverse Texte von ihm ins Französische übersetzt. In jüngster Zeit erschien von ihr die Monographie Demokratie ohne Volk (Hamburger Edition, 2011). Einige ihrer Aufsätze sind auch in deutscher Sprache verfügbar: „Das Gastrecht – oder die Demokratie auf den Prüfstand der Immigration“, in Nele Kortendiek, Marina Martinez Mateo (Hg.): Grenze und Demokratie. Ein Spannungsverhältnis (Campus Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 2017); „Politische Subjektivierung im Kontext der Pluralisierung des Rechts“, in Tatjana Sheplyakova (Hg.): Prozeduralisierung des Rechts (Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, 2018). Ihre aktuelle Forschung bezieht sich auf die normativen Grundlagen der sozialen Rechte, das Gastrecht und die Demokratie in Europa.

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • PD Dr. Thomas Biebricher (Postdoktorand des Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Seel (Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Seel (Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Seel (Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst (Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Colliot-Thélène (Emeritierte Professorin der politischen Philosophie an der Universität Rennes)

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "Demokratie in der Krise? Bruch, Regression und Resilienz": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

The history of the modern world has been told as a process of decreasing recourse to rampant violence: As a process of civilization that taught societies to tame human affects; as a process of legalization that led states and societies to regulate conflicts peacefully; and as a process of rising interdependence that made international conflict increasingly unprofitable. Even instances of massive collective violence, including world wars and the Holocaust, have been interpreted as deviant data points within an impressive macro-historical trend of pacification. This progressive narrative has been reinforced by the institutionalization of liberal norms and values, the global expansion of democracy and the peaceful termination of the Cold War.
While this diagnosis resonates with the Enlightenment ideas of modernization and rationalization, it runs the risk to oversee counter-evidence and underestimate developments that point to the opposite direction. New technologies allow for new kinds of weapons and the militarization of outer space and the internet. Non-state actors increasingly engage in mass-terrorism and new kinds of civil war. States adapt to these developments combining conventional and unconventional strategies in hybrid-warfare. What is more, the laws of war are increasingly violated and established institutions of regulating conflict are being questioned. Even the validity of formally agreed principles such as the illegality of violent conquest or the prohibition of chemical weapons are under pressure.
Do we witness the end of pacification? Is political violence transforming itself to the effect that it once again dominates political agendas? Or do we simply see the systemic contradictions inherent in the process of pacification which had all along consisted in the transformation and externalization rather than the overall reduction or even elimination of violence? Leading scholars from various  disciplines aim to find answers to these questions in this lecture series.

Organized by: Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen", Leibniz Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung), Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen", Leibniz Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung) and Dr. Julian Junk (Leibniz Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung)

 Programm (pdf): Hier...

Programm:

Donnerstag, 11. Oktober 2018, 18.15 Uhr
Has War Declined Through Human History?
Prof. Michael Mann (University of California, Los Angeles)

Mittwoch, 12. Dezember 2018, 18.15 Uhr
Sexual Violence during War
Prof. Elizabeth J. Wood (Yale University)

Mittwoch, 23. Januar 2019, 18.15 Uhr
Sanktionskriege: Probleme dezentraler militärischer Normdurchsetzung
Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")

Mittwoch, 30. Januar 2019, 18.15 Uhr
Disturbing the Peace: How the United States Influences Trends in Global Political Violence
Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista (Cornell University)

Mittwoch, 6. Februar 2019, 18.15 Uhr
Global Change and Civil Wars
Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas (University of Oxford)

Mittwoch, 13. Februar 2019, 18.15 Uhr
Pockets of Barbarism: Internal and External Challenges to the International Humanitarian Order
Prof. Jennifer Welsh (European University Institute)

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Vorausgegangene Ringvorlesungen: Hier...

Pockets of Barbarism: Internal and External Challenges to the International Humanitarian Order

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh (McGill University, Montreal)

13. Februar 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

Abstract
This lecture challenges the meta-narrative of gradual pacification, by examining the manifestations, drivers, and consequences of the contemporary return of ‘barbarism‘ in armed conflict. While Stephen Pinker and others point to the vast majority of countries in the world that now enjoy relative peace, the ‘remaining 20 percent‘ is experiencing both interstate and civil conflict in which indiscriminate attacks on civilians, the annihilation of
religious and ethnic minorities, and the starvation of populations are a regular part of the strategic repertoire of belligerents. The lecture will assess both the reasons for the increasing lethality of armed conflicts for civilians, particularly in urban settings (with a particular focus on Syria and Yemen), as well as the impact on the regime of international humanitarian law that aims to regulate conflict and minimise suffering. It will also argue that contemporary challenges to that regulation are not only external to the regime, but also internal to its principles and rules. IHL has always had within it an inherent tension between humanitarian considerations and the imperative of military necessity, which has in some cases enabled the
current return of barbarism. The lecture will also contest the tendency to cast nonstate armed groups as the key perpetrators of barbarism, and demonstrate how nation-states themselves are also contributing to an erosion of the international humanitarian order.

CV
Jennifer M. Welsh is the Canada 150 Research Chair in Global Governance and Security at McGill University (Montreal, Canada). She was previously Professor and Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and Professor in International Relations at the University of Oxford, where she co-founded the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict. From 2013-2016, she served as the Special
Adviser to the UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon, on the Responsibility to Protect. Professor Welsh is the author, co-author, and editor of several books and articles on humanitarian intervention, the evolution of the notion of the ‘responsibility to protect’ in international society, the UN Security Council, and Canadian foreign policy.
Her most recent books include The Return of History: Conflict, Migration and Geopolitics in the 21st century (2016), which was based on her CBC Massey Lectures, and The Responsibility to Prevent: Overcoming the
Challenges of Atrocity Prevention (2015).

Video:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Dr. Julian Junk, Leiter Berliner Büro, Projektleiter, wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Postdoctoral Researcher am Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Dr. Julian Junk, Leiter Berliner Büro, Projektleiter, wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Postdoctoral Researcher am Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Jennifer M. Welsh, Professor at McGill University in Montreal, Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute and Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College at University of Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Global Change and Civil Wars

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas (University of Oxford)

6. Februar 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

Abstract
The systematic and comparative analysis of civil wars has relied primarily on the experience of the post-WWII and Cold War period (1945-1990) to draw general lessons which are extrapolated into the future. This is clearly problematic, as both the pre- and the post-Cold War periods vary on a number of key dimensions; it stands to reason that this variation would impact the likelihood but also the character of civil wars. Yet, this reasonable
conjecture has yet to be explored systematically. Moving beyond early superficial and misleading speculation about “new versus old wars,” recent research has pointed to changes in warfare between the Cold War and the post-Cold War period, but also emerging differentiations between
the post-Cold War unipolar and Liberal era and an emerging period of multipolarity and newly ideological insurgencies. I take stock of these trends and sketch a theory that seeks to specify how macro-historical change has shaped civil wars from the late 18th century to the present.

CV
Stathis N. Kalyvas is Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford. Until 2018 he was Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he also directed the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence and codirected the Hellenic Studies Program. He is the author of The Rise of
Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006), Modern Greece: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2015), the co-editor of Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and the Oxford Handbook on
Terrorism (Oxford University Press, 2019), and the author of over fifty scholarly articles in five languages. His current research focuses on global trends in civil conflict and political violence with an additional interest in the history and politics of Greece. His work has received several awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Award for best book on government, politics, or international affairs.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Direktorin des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Professorin für Internationale Beziehungen und Theorien globaler Ordnungen der Goethe-Universität; Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Direktorin des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Professorin für Internationale Beziehungen und Theorien globaler Ordnungen der Goethe-Universität; Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Direktorin des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Professorin für Internationale Beziehungen und Theorien globaler Ordnungen der Goethe-Universität; Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Direktorin des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Professorin für Internationale Beziehungen und Theorien globaler Ordnungen der Goethe-Universität
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Stathis N. Kalyvas, Gladstone Professor of Government and Fellow of All Souls College at Oxford
  • Prof. Dr. Martin Saar, Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“

Video:

 

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Sexual Violence during War

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Prof. Elisabeth J. Wood (Yale University)

12. Dezember 2018, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

Abstract
When rape occurs frequently by an armed organization, it is often said to be a strategy of war. But some cases of conflict-related rape are better understood as a practice, violence that has not been explicitly adopted as organization policy but is nonetheless tolerated by commanders.
Drawing on examples from World War II to Vietnam to current conflicts, I present a typology of conflict-related rape that emphasizes not only vertical relationship between commanders (principals) and combatants (agents) but also the horizontal, social interactions among combatants. I analyze when rape and/or other forms of sexual violence are likely to be prevalent as organizational policy and those for which they are likely to occur as a practice. I emphasize not only the gendered norms and beliefs of the society from which combatants come but also how these might be transformed by the organization’s socialization processes. I conclude with a brief assessment of the implications for research and for policy.

CV
Elisabeth Jean Wood is Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University. She is the author of Forging Democracy from Below: Insurgent Transitions in South Africa and El Salvador and Insurgent Collective Action and Civil War in El Salvador, and co-editor with Morten Bergsmo and Alf B. Skre of Understanding and Proving International Sex Crimes. Among her recent articles are “Rape as a Practice of War: Towards a Typology of Political Violence,” “The Persistence of Sexual Assault within the US Military,” “Rape during War Is Not Inevitable” and “The Social Processes of Civil War: The Wartime Transformation of Social Networks,” as well as two articles co-authored with Francisco Gutiérrez Sanín, “What should we mean by “pattern of political violence”? Repertoire, targeting, frequency, and technique” and “Ideology and Civil War.” A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, she teaches courses on comparative politics, political violence, collective action, and qualitative research methods.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Elisabeth J. Wood (Crosby Professor of the Human Environment and Professor of Political Science, International and Area Studies at Yale University)

Video:

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Has War Declined Through Human History?

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Prof. Michael Mann (University of California, Los Angeles)

11. Oktober 2018, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

Abstract
For over 150 years liberal optimism has dominated theories of war. It has been repeatedly argued that war either is declining or will shortly decline. There have been exceptions, especially in Germany and more generally in the first half of the twentieth century, but there has been a recent revival of such optimism, especially in the work of Azar Gat, John Mueller, Joshua Goldstein, and Steven Pinker who all perceive a long-term decline in war through history, speeding up in the post-1945 period. Critiquing Pinker’s statistics on war fatalities, I show that the overall pattern is not a decline in war, but substantial variation between periods and places. War has not declined and current trends are slightly in the opposite direction. Civil wars in the global South have largely replaced inter-state wars in the North, but there is also Northern involvement in most of them. War for the North is now less “ferocious” than “callous”, which renders war less visible and less central to Northern culture, which has the deceptive appearance of pacifism. Viewed from the South the view has been bleaker both in the colonial period and today. Globally war is not declining, but it is being transformed.

CV
Michael Mann is Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University. He has a BA and D.Phil. from Oxford University. He is a member of both the American and British Academies. His major publication project has been the four volumes of The Sources of Social Power published by Cambridge University Press: Volume 1: A History of Power from the Beginning to 1760 (published in 1986); Volume 2: The Rise of Classes and Nation-States, 1760–1914 (1993); Volume 3: Global Empires and Revolution, 1890–1945 (2012); Volume 4: Globalizations, 1945–2011 (2013). He also has books on American imperialism, fascism, and ethnic cleansing. Two books of essays have discussed his work, The Anatomy of Power: The Social Theory of Michael Mann (2006), and Global Powers: Mann’s Anatomy of the twentieth Century and Beyond (2018). He is currently writing a book on war.

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century": Hier...

Video:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University) und Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisation an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisation an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Stellvertretender Direktor des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens und Konfliktforschung und Leiter der Abteilungen „Internationale Sicherheit“ und „Transnationale Akteure“)
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisation an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Stellvertretender Direktor des Leibniz-Instituts Hessische Stiftung Friedens und Konfliktforschung und Leiter der Abteilungen „Internationale Sicherheit“ und „Transnationale Akteure“)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University) und Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisation an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Rebecca Caroline Schmidt (Geschäftsführerin des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Rebecca Caroline Schmidt (Geschäftsführerin des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase (Professor für Internationale Organisation an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“) und Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)
  • Professor Michael Mann (Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology, UCLA, and Honorary Professor, Cambridge University)

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Disturbing the Peace: How the United States Influences Trends in Global Political Violence

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista (Cornell University)

30. Januar 2019, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ9

Abstract
In the debates over whether the world is undergoing a long-term decline in political violence or merely a transformation, the United States plays a distinctive role. Having accumulated more political and military power than history has ever seen, the United States finds itself in a hegemonic position that offers it disproportionate influence on the norms governing the use of force. Even if prevailing global trends point toward greater pacification of political life, can US behavior undermine those trends? This presentation seeks answers by examining several patterns evident in recent US behavior, some of which represent US initiatives, others of which follow other states’ examples. These include: selective individualization and permissive legalization of armed conflict, violent polarization of domestic conflict; government-sanctioned persecution of refugees and immigrants; and promotion of misogynist nationalism. Some of these behaviors are the product of Donald Trump’s administration, but others are of longer gestation.

CV
Matthew Evangelista is President White Professor of History and Political Science and former chair of the Department of Government at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.  He received his undergraduate degree in Russian History and Literature from Harvard and his MA and PhD in Government from Cornell. He has been a visiting scholar at Harvard, Stanford, the Brookings Institution, and the European University Institute in Florence, and a visiting professor at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milan, Università di Bologna, and Università di Roma Tre. His recent books include Law, Ethics, and the War on Terror (2008), Gender, Nationalism, and War (2011), The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical and Legal Norms, from Flying Fortresses to Drones (2014), and Do the Geneva Conventions Matter? (2017). He has served on the editorial boards of Cornell University Press and journals including World Politics and International Organization, and as Chair of the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research.

Video:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University; Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung
  • Prof. Matthew A. Evangelista, President White Professor of History and Political Science at Cornell University; Prof. Dr. Christopher Daase, Professor für Internationale Organisationen der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung

Weitere Informationen zur Ringvorlesung "The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century": Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität


Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

Programme (Abstracts, CVs) (pdf): click here...

3 May 2017, 6.15pm
Vom Rechtsgüterschutz zur Aufmerksamkeit für das Besondere – Partikularisierung des Strafrechts?
Klaus Günther (Goethe-University Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders")

10 May 2017, 6.15pm
Titanen oder Zyklopen? Kriminalisierungstheorie zwischen Einheit und Vielfalt
Beatrice Brunhöber (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

24 May 2017, 6.15pm
Contemporary Critical Thought and Juridical Practice
Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en
Sciences Sociales, Paris)

14 June 2017, 6.15pm
Multikausale und monokausale Erklärungen des Verbrechens in der frühen Kriminologie – Eine 12-jährige Raubmörderin vor Gericht (RGSt 15, 87)
David von Mayenburg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Institut für
Rechtsgeschichte)

21 June 2017, 6.15pm
Legitimationsbedürfnisse internationalisierter strafrechtlicher Hoheitsgewalt Zwischen Pluralismus und Nativismus
Frank Meyer (Universität Zürich)

12 July 2017, 6.15pm
Criminal Law and the Promise of Self-Government
Malcolm Thorburn (University of Toronto, Faculty of Law)

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Previous Lecture Series: click here...

Criminal Law and the Promise of Self-Government


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Malcolm Thorburn (University of Toronto, Faculty of Law)

12. Juli 2017, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

Abstract
Modern international law has been dominated by the principle of national self-determination. The idea that each people has the right to establish its own government and through it to  set  the  basic  terms of interaction within  its  jurisdiction, has become the beginning (if not the end)  of every argument about international affairs. In this climate, one might expect the old rule of law idea of criminal law to  thrive. For this is the idea of criminal law as the mechanism through which the state reasserts its sole authority over the terms of interaction within it jurisdiction. In fact, however, the old rule of law idea of criminal law has almost disappeared  from view. The boundaries between criminal law and ordinary tools of  state  policy  have  all  but disappeared; procedural differences between criminal justice and other processes have faded; and even the state’s monopoly on criminal law jurisdiction has given way to a variety of international and transnational actors who have assumed the power to make criminal laws.
Criminal law theory has tried hard to keep up with developments. Some writers have turned to a universalist moral discourse: criminal law identifies serious moral wrongdoing that anyone has  the standing to identify, to censure and to punish. Others have turned to a romantic vision of criminal law of each jurisdiction as the embodiment of the “Volksgeist” of its people. The roots of criminal law in the idea of self-government under the rule of law have become obscure. This lecture will explore what is lost and what (if anything) is gained from these developments.

CV

Malcolm Thorburn is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Toronto. He studied philosophy at the University of Toronto and the University of Pennsylvania, and law at  the  University  of Toronto and Columbia University from which he received his doctorate in law in  2008. Until 2012, he held the Canada Research Chair in Crime, Security and Constitutionalism at  Queen’s  University,  Canada.  He served as Law Clerk to Mr. Justice Louis LeBel at the Supreme Court of Canada in 2000-2001. He has held visiting fellowships at the Australian  National University (2008), Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (2011), the French National Centre for Criminology (CESDIP) (2011) and  Magdalen  College, Oxford (2011-2012). His writing focuses on theoretical issues in and around criminal justice and constitutional theory. He is an editor of two books: The Philosophical Foundations of Constitutional Law and The Dignity of Law. His work has appeared in such publications as the Yale Law Journal, the Boston University Law Review, the University of Toronto Law Journal, Criminal Law and Philosophy and many book collections. He is the book reviews editor of the University of Toronto Law Journal and he serves on the editorial boards of the journals Law and Philosophy, and Criminal Law and Philosophy, and the New Criminal Law Review.

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Legitimationsbedürfnisse internationalisierter strafrechtlicher Hoheitsgewalt Zwischen Pluralismus und Nativismus


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Frank Meyer (Universität Zürich)

21. Juni 2017, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

 

Abstract
Die Strafrechtspflege gehört zu den klassischen staatlichen Aufgaben. In einem zunehmend komplexen Handlungsumfeld sieht der Staat sich jedoch vielfältigen faktischen  Notwendigkeiten  und  normativen Erfordernissen ausgesetzt, seine Rolle als exklusiver und autarker Schöpfer von Strafnormen zu relativieren oder sogar aufzugeben. Traditionelle Legitimationskonzepte  strafrechtlicher Hoheitsgewalt stellt das auf eine harte Probe. Der Vortrag wird der Frage nachgehen, wie es um deren Anpassungsfähigkeit  bestellt  ist  und  welche  alternativen Ansätze diskutabel wären, um jenseits des Staates geschaffenem Recht gegenüber den von ihm betroffenen Bürgern Legitimität zu verschaffen.

CV

Frank Meyer ist Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich. Er studierte Rechtswissenschaften an der  Universität Hamburg und an der Yale Law School. 2002 wurde er in Hamburg promoviert und 2011 in Bonn habilitiert. Zuvor verbrachte  Meyer einige Jahre am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches und internationales Strafrecht in Freiburg.
Seine Forschungstätigkeit konzentriert sich auf die Funktion und Legitimation von Strafe bei der Konstituierung und Konstitutionalisierung von transnationalen Herrschaftsräumen sowie auf die Strukturen, Prinzipien und Finalitäten grenzüberschreitend-integrierter Strafrechtspflege.

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Frank Meyer, LL.M. (Yale) (Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Frank Meyer, LL.M. (Yale) (Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich)
  • Prof. Dr. Frank Meyer, LL.M. (Yale) (Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich)
  • Prof. Dr. Frank Meyer, LL.M. (Yale) (Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich)
  • Prof. Dr. Frank Meyer, LL.M. (Yale) (Professor für Strafrecht und  Strafprozessrecht unter Einschluss des internationalen Strafrechts an der Universität Zürich)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Multikausale und monokausale Erklärungen des Verbrechens in der frühen Kriminologie – Eine 12-jährige Raubmörderin vor Gericht (RGSt 15, 87)


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

David von Mayenburg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Institut für
Rechtsgeschichte)

14. Juni 2017, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

Abstract
Die durch Franz von Liszt (1851-1919) begründete „moderne Schule“ des Strafrechts suchte auf den ersten Blick die Straftat als ein multikausal erklärbares Geschehen zu fassen: Anlage- und Umweltmomente kamen gleichermaßen und in je spezifischer Kombination als Verbrechensursachen in Betracht. Ziel der von Liszt begründeten „gesamten Strafrechtswissenschaft“ war es daher, diese verschiedenen Ursachen empirisch zu erforschen, um dann der Praxis eine Möglichkeit an die Hand zu geben, eine für den jeweiligen Täter angemessene Straffolge zu finden.
Es fragt sich aber, welche Chancen dieser Ansatz im  zeitgenössischen Kontext tatsächlich hatte: Während in der Medizin seit der Entdeckung des Lepra-Erregers (1873) monokausale Erklärungen krankhafter Prozesse wichtig wurden, spielten auch im politischen Diskurs einfache, biologistische Erklärungsansätze eine große Rolle.
Der Vortrag fragt am Beispiel eines 1886 vor dem Reichsgericht verhandelten Mordprozesses, in dem die Schuldfähigkeit einer 12-jährigen Raubmörderin verhandelt wurde, nach der Bedeutung derartiger Konzepte für die Rechtspraxis.

CV

David von Mayenburg
ist seit Februar 2014 Inhaber eines Lehrstuhls für Neuere Rechtsgeschichte, Geschichte des Kirchenrechts und Zivilrecht an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
Nach Studium der Geschichtswissenschaften an der LMU München (1988-95, M.A. bei Gerhard A. Ritter) und der Rechtswissenschaften an der Universität Bonn (Examina 2000 und 2004) erfolgte dort bei Mathias Schmoeckel die Promotion zum Dr. iur. (2006). Die Arbeit Kriminologie und Strafrecht zwischen Kaiserreich und Nationalsozialismus. Hans von Hentig (1887–1974), Baden-Baden 2006, erhielt den Preis des Italienischen Staatspräsidenten. Die Habilitation erfolgte in Bonn 2012. Die Schrift Gemeiner Mann und Gemeines Recht erscheint demnächst. 2013 war David   von Mayenburg Extraordinarius für Rechtsgeschichte an der Universität Luzern. Einen Ruf an die Humboldt-Universität Berlin lehnte er 2016  ab. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der Strafrechtsgeschichte, der Rechtsgeschichte der Frühen Neuzeit und der Geschichte des klassischen Kirchenrechts.

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. David von Mayenburg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. David von Mayenburg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte)
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther (Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard (Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. David von Mayenburg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte)

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Contemporary Critical Thought and Juridical Practice


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

24. Mai 2017, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

Abstract
Throughout the ages, legal practices have served as critical tools for social inquiry and as models for the discovery of truth in other fields. In Truth and Juridical Forms (1973) and Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling (1981), Michel Foucault traced the birth of certain forms of modern social scientific inquiry to ancient forms of juridical practice, such as, for instance, the quasi-avowal of Antilokus in Book 23 of Homer’s Iliad or the search for truth in Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex. What of today? What is the relationship today, in contemporary critical thought, between social inquiry in the human sciences and the methods or practices of law? And if that question is ultimately indeterminate, what then should the  relationship look like?

CV
Bernard E. Harcourt is a contemporary critical theorist and the author, most recently, of Exposed: Desire and Disobedience in the Digital Age and The Illusion of Free Markets: Punishment and the Myth of Natural Order.
Harcourt is the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia University, Professor  of Political Science, and  the founding director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought; he is also directeur d’études (chaired  professor) at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. During 2016-2017, heis visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.
Professor Harcourt is also the editor of Michel Foucault’s 1972-73 lectures at the Collège de France, La Société punitive, and the 1971-1972 lectures as well, Théories et institutions pénales. He is also the editor of the new Pléiade edition of Surveiller et punir in the collected works of Foucault at Gallimard.
Professor Harcourt is also an active death row lawyer. He began represented inmates sentenced to death in Alabama in 1990 and continues that work on a pro bono basis today on cases challenging the death penalty and life imprisonment without parole.

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)
  • Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)
  • Johann Szews, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Jonathan Klein, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)
  • Bernard E. Harcourt (Columbia University & École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Titanen oder Zyklopen? Kriminalisierungstheorie zwischen Einheit und Vielfalt


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Beatrice Brunhöber (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

10. Mai 2017, 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

 

Abstract
Darüber, welches Verhalten strafrechtlich verboten werden darf oder gar muss, lässt sich trefflich streiten. Die Rechtsgutstheorie sucht in der deutschen Strafrechtswissenschaft seit zwei  Jahr hunderten nach einer Antwort auf diese schwierige Frage. Viele gehen davon aus, dass die Antwort seit Feuerbach kontinuierlich auf einem theoretischen Fundament ruht und im Grunde eine  Antwort  formuliert: Strafwürdig sind nur Verhaltensweisen, die Rechtsgüter verletzen.
Aber ist die Einheit der Antwort nicht bloß eine große Erzählung (Lyotard)? Kann diese Erzählung in einer Welt aufrechterhalten werden, die empirisch von der Koexistenz verschiedenster Wertvorstellungen in der Gesellschaft geprägt  ist  und normativ auf den Ideen des Pluralismus fußt? Fehlt uns  gleich  den  Zyklopen  ein  Auge,  um  den  Standpunkt der anderen zu sehen (Kant)? Oder gilt nicht umgekehrt: Kehrt man der Einheit der Antwort den Rücken, so drohen  zwangsläufig Beliebigkeit und Relativität? Müssen wir an einer einheitlichen Antwort festhalten, um als Titanen eine Bastion gegen unbegründete Kriminalisierungen zu verteidigen?

CV

Beatrice Brunhöber ist Professorin für Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht an der Leibniz Universität Hannover. Sie studierte Rechtswissenschaften an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, wo sie  2009 promoviert wurde und sich 2016 habilitierte. Sie war Visiting Scholar an der George Washington University Law School (Washington D.C.) und Junior Fellow an der DFG-Kollegforschergruppe „Normenbegründung in der Medizinethik und Biopolitik“ der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster. Im Strafrecht befasst sie sich mit Grundfragen des materiellen Strafrechts sowie mit Medizin-, Datenschutz-, Computer- und Internetstrafrecht. Daneben hat sie einen Schwerpunkt in der Rechtsphilosophie, wo sie sich vor allem mit Kriminalisierungstheorien und bioethischen Fragen beschäftigt.
Weiterhin interessiert sie  sich für die Strafrechtsvergleichung mit dem kontinentaleuropäischen und angelsächsischen Raum. Bücher (Auswahl): Die Erfindung "demokratischer Repräsentation“ in den Federalist Papers (2009) (Auswahl zum juristischen Buch des Jahres 2010); Strafrecht und Verfassung (Mithrsg., 2013); Strafrecht im Präventionsstaat (Hrsg., 2014); Strafrechtlicher Schutz der informationellen Selbstbestimmung  (i.Vb.).

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Vom Rechtsgüterschutz zur Aufmerksamkeit für das Besondere – Partikularisierung des Strafrechts?


Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen": Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Klaus Günther (Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

3. Mai 2017, 18.15 Uhr

 

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11

Abstract
Modernes Strafrecht ist Rechtsgüterschutz – so lautet die bis heute gängige Definition. Rechtsgüter sind verallgemeinerte Interessen gleicher Personen, auch dann, wenn sie individuell zugeordnet werden, wie Leib, Leben, Freiheit, Eigentum. In jüngster Zeit wird jedoch immer häufiger gefordert, dass das Strafrecht (mitsamt dem Strafverfahren) vor allem auf individuelle Lebenslagen und Bedürfnisse eingehen solle. Eine zentrale Rolle spielt dabei die öffentliche Zuwendung für das Verbrechensopfer und sein individuelles Leid, dem bisher weder im Strafrecht noch im Strafverfahren die vermeintlich gebotene Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt worden sei. Nicht nur das Strafrecht, sondern das Recht (und die Gerichte) überhaupt zeigten zu wenig Empathie, Einfühlungsvermögen, Verständnis für die konkrete Situation Einzelner. Der Vortrag geht möglichen Motiven dieser Entwicklung nach und fragt (kritisch) nach den normativen Konsequenzen.

CV

Klaus Günther
ist Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht an der Goethe-Universität und Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“. Er ist Mitglied des Forschungskollegiums am Frankfurter Institut für Sozialforschung sowie Fellow und Mitglied des Direktoriums am Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften der Goethe-Universität in Bad Homburg.
Günther studierte Philosophie und Rechtswissenschaft an der Goethe-Universität. Von 1983 bis 1996 war er hier wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Hochschulassistent – u.a. in einer rechtstheoretischen Arbeitsgruppe (1986-1990) unter der Leitung von Jürgen Habermas, in deren Rahmen er promoviert wurde. Seiner Habilitation im Jahr 1997 folgten Berufungen an die EUI Florenz und an die Universitäten Rostock und Zürich, die er ablehnte. Gastprofessuren führten ihn u.a. an die Buffalo Law School (State University of New York), an das Corpus Christi College Oxford, an die École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Maison des Sciences de l’Homme) Paris, an die London School of Economics, Department of Law, und an die SciencesPo Paris, Ecole de droit. Zu seinen Publikationen gehören: Der Sinn für Angemessenheit (1988, engl. 1993, portug. 2004) und Schuld und kommunikative Freiheit (2005). Er ist Co-Herausgeber der Schriftenreihe Normative Orders (Campus).

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Burchard Professor für Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, Internationales und Europäisches Strafrecht, Rechtsvergleichung und Rechtstheorie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Marcus Willaschek, Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Modelling Transformation

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Programme:

20 April 2016, 6.15pm
Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Knöbl (Direktor des Hamburger Instituts für Sozialforschung)
Was ist ein sozialer Prozess?

4 May 2016, 6.15pm
Prof. Dr. Rudolf Stichweh (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
Soziokulturelle Evolution und soziale Differenzierung: Das Studium der Gesellschaftsgeschichte und die beiden Soziologien der Transformation

1 June 2016, 6.15pm
Prof. Dr. Eva Geulen (Direktorin des Zentrums für Literaturforschung, Berlin)
Reihenbildung nach Goethe

15 June 2016, 6.15pm
Prof. Dr. Andrew Abbott (University of Chicago)
Processual Social Theory

29 June 2016, 6.15pm
Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
The Strange Modernity of Modern Science

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders" in special cooperation with Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften and SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime".

The Strange Modernity of Modern Science

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

29. Juni 2016

Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Abstract
In der ersten Hälfte des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts begannen Philosophen, Historiker und Sozialtheoretiker zu argumentieren, dass die moderne Welt weder aus der religiösen Reformation des sechzehnten Jahrhunderts, noch aus den politischen Revolutionen des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts, ja noch nicht einmal aus der industriellen Revolution des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts entstanden sei. Nein, die Ursprünge der modernen Welt lägen in der wissenschaftlichen Revolution (ein Begriff, der erst zu diesem Zeitpunkt in den allgemeinen Sprachgebrauch überging, was zu großen Teilen eben diesen Autoren geschuldet war). Nur wann genau diese Revolution erfolgte (1500–1700? 1300-1800? Oder war sie noch in vollem Gange?), was ihre Inhalte waren (sicherlich Astronomie und Mechanik, aber was ist mit Biologie und Chemie?) und wer ihre Helden sind (Kopernikus? Bacon? Galileo? Newton?) – all dies war umstritten. Aber britische, französische, amerikanische und deutsche Autoren waren sich überraschend einig in ihren Ansichten über die Natur dieser durch die Wissenschaft hervorgebrachten transformativen Modernität: Sie war nicht weniger als die Erschaffung der modernen Mentalität und, damit einhergehend, der Verlust der gelebten Erfahrung.

CV
Lorraine Daston studierte in Harvard und Cambridge und erhielt 1979 in Harvard ihren Ph.D. in Wissenschaftsgeschichte.
Sie unterrichtete in Harvard, Princeton, Brandeis, Göttingen und Chicago und ist seit 1995 Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte in Berlin. Außerdem ist sie regelmäßig Gastprofessorin am „Committee on Social Thought“ der Universität von Chicago sowie Permanent Fellow am Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. Sie arbeitet zu einem breiten Themenspektrum der frühneuzeitlichen und modernen Wissenschaftsgeschichte, unter anderem zu Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung und Statistik, Wundern und der Ordnung der Natur, wissenschaftlichen Bildern, Objektivität und anderen epistemischen Tugenden, Quantifizierung, Beobachtung, Algorithmen sowie der moralischen Autorität der Natur. Das Motiv, welches alle Ihre Arbeiten durchzieht, ist die Geschichte der Rationalität, ihre Ideale und Praktiken. Sie ist Fellow der American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Mitglied der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und korrespondierendes Mitglied der British Academy.

Vortrag in englischer Sprache

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston, Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple, Professor für Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
  • Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple, Professor für Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
  • Prof. Dr. Lorraine Daston (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften und dem SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime"

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Weitere Informationen: Mehr...

Processual Social Theory

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

15. Juni 2016

Prof. Dr. Andrew Abbott (University of Chicago)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Abstract
Es geht um die Grundlagen einer prozessualen Theorie des gesellschaftlichen Lebens. Ausgehend von der Prämisse, dass Veränderung der Normalzustand alles Sozialen ist, ersetzt die prozessuale Theorie das traditionelle und schwer lösbare Problem, Wandel in einem als stabil angenommenen System zu erklären, durch das leichter lösbare Problem, Stabilität als Nebenprodukt von Wandel zu erklären. Skizziert wird eine Sozialontologie, in der sowohl Personen als auch soziale Gruppen als Entwicklungslinien, definiert über Ereignisse im Laufe der Zeit, hervorgebracht werden. Dieser Schritt ersetzt die Idee der Ebenen durch jene der Koplanarität.
Das Gegenwärtige ist nicht unmittelbar, sondern weist eine begrenzte Dauer auf, da Handlungen, Bedeutungen und Einschränkungen unterschiedlich lange benötigen, um soziale Prozesse zu durchdringen. Zur Sprache kommt das Konzept des Kodierens, welches den Mechanismus bezeichnet, durch den 1) der soziale Prozess zu jedem Augenblick eine Aufzeichnung aller möglichen kausalen Effekte der Vergangenheit behält, und 2) Phänomene anderer Ordnungen (das Gehirn, die physische Umwelt etc.) als Reservoir von Erinnerungen dienen, die zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ‚lebendig‘ werden können. Schließlich wird die Nützlichkeit dieser Analyse am Beispiel umfangreicher Transformationen sozialer und kultureller Entitäten aufgezeigt.

CV
Andrew Abbott ist Professor für Soziologie an der Universität von Chicago. Er studierte Geschichte, Literatur und Soziologie in Harvard und Chicago, wo er 1982 promoviert wurde. Nach 13 Jahren Lehrtätigkeit an der Rutgers Universität (New Jersey) kehrte er 1991 nach Chicago zurück.
Abbott ist bekannt für seine kontextsensitiven Beschäftigungstheorien und war Vorreiter einer algorithmenbasierten Herangehensweise in der soziologischen Sequenzanalyse. Er publizierte zu den Grundlagen der sozialwissenschaftlichen Methodik sowie zur Entwicklung der Sozial- wissenschaften und des akademischen Systems. Sein Werk umfasst u. a. The System of Professions (Chicago 1988), für das er 1991 den ASA Sorokin Award gewann, sowie eine historische Studie über akademische Disziplinen und Publikationen (Department and Discipline; Chicago 1999) und eine theoretische Analyse von fraktalen Mustern in sozialen und kulturellen Strukturen (Chaos of Disciplines; Chicago 2001). Seine neueste Publikation ist ein Studienhandbuch für die Nutzung von Bibliotheken und Internetmaterialien (Digital Paper; Chicago, 2014).

Vortrag in englischer Sprache

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften und dem SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime"

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Weitere Informationen: Mehr...

Reihenbildung nach Goethe

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

1. Juni 2016

Prof. Dr. Eva Geulen (Direktorin des Zentrums für Literaturforschung, Berlin)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Abstract
Goethe hat in seiner Morphologie und anrainenden Schriften mit der Reihe als Modellierung von Formenwandel in der Zeit experimentiert. Im 20. Jahrhundert wurde dieses protostrukturalistische Verfahren in verschiedenen Disziplinen wieder aufgenommen. Ihrer kritischen Sichtung gilt der Vortrag.

CV
Eva Geulen ist Direktorin des Zentrums für Literatur- und Kulturforschung und Professorin für europäische Kultur- und Wissensgeschichte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Sie studierte Germanistik und Philosophie in Freiburg und Baltimore/USA und promovierte 1989. Ihren Lehrtätigkeiten an der Stanford University, University of Rochester und New York University (1989 – 2003) folgten Professuren für neuere deutsche Literaturwissenschaft an der Universität Bonn (2003 – 2012) und an der Universität Frankfurt (2012 – 2015). Zu ihren wichtigste Publikationen zählen Giorgio Agamben zur Einführung (2009, 2. Aufl.); Das Ende der Kunst. Lesarten eines Gerüchts nach Hegel (2002); Worthörig wider Willen. Darstellungsproblematik und Sprachreflexion bei Adalbert Stifter (1992). Eva Geulen ist Mitherausgeberin der Zeitschrift für deutsche Philologie. Forschungsschwerpunkte: Literatur und Philosophie vom 18. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart, Erziehungsdiskursebv1800 und 1900, Goethes Morphologie und ihre Rezeption im 20. Jahrhundert.

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Eva Geulen, Direktorin des Zentrums für Literaturforschung, Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Julika Griem, Professorin am Institut für England und Amerikastudien der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple, Professor für Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. Bernhard Jussen, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Mittelalterliche Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften und dem SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime"

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Weitere Informationen: Mehr...

Soziokulturelle Evolution und soziale Differenzierung: Das Studium der Gesellschaftsgeschichte und die beiden Soziologien der Transformation

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

4. Mai 2016

Prof. Dr. Rudolf Stichweh (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Abstract
Der Vortrag wird ‚Soziokulturelle Evolution‘ und ‚soziale Differenzierung‘ als die beiden soziologischen Theorien ergleichend analysieren, die sich für die Deskription und Erklärung des langfristigen Strukturwandels menschlicher Gesellschaften am besten eignen. Die Differenzierungstheorie hat ihren Schwerpunkt in einer historischen Makrosoziologie der Formen der Systembildung (Gruppen, tribale Verbände, Schichten, Kasten, Klassen, Organisationen, Funktionssysteme), deren Verschiedenheit und Sequenz die Gesellschaftsgeschichte bestimmt. Die Evolutionstheorie fügt dieser Zugangsweise eine Mikrosoziologie der basalen Einheiten der Strukturbildung (Erwartungen, Institutionen, Regeln, Meme, Symbole) hinzu, in denen Traditionen gespeichert und in die Variation inkorporiert wird. Wenn man dies so vorstellt, sind die beiden Theorien unweigerlich aufeinander angewiesen. Der Vortrag demonstriert dies in einer elementaren Rekonstruktion der Gesellschaftsgeschichte.

CV

Rudolf Stichweh ist Professor für Theorie der modernen Gesellschaft an der Universität Bonn. Er arbeitet auf dem Gebiet der Systemtheorie und der Theorien soziokultureller Evolution. Die Begriffe und die Theorien, die er diesen intellektuellen Traditionen verdankt, benutzt er in den Untersuchungs- zusammenhängen, die ihn vor allem interessieren: dem Studium der Strukturtransformationen menschlicher Gesellschaften von der Entstehung des Homo Sapiens bis zur Weltgesellschaft der Gegenwart; dem vergleichenden Studium der Funktionssysteme als der dominanten Form der Strukturbildung der Weltgesellschaft des 18. – 21. Jahrhunderts. Unter den Funktionssystemen wiederum konzentriert er sich besonders auf die demokratischen und autoritären politischen Systeme der Gegenwart und auf die primären Institutionen des Wissens und der Wissenschaft. Bücher: Die Weltgesellschaft (2000); Der Fremde (2010); Wissenschaft, Universität, Professionen (2. Aufl. 2013, Bd. 2 i. Vb.); Inklusion und Exklusion (2. Aufl. 2016); Theorie der Weltgesellschaft (i. Vb.).

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildegalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Rudolf Stichweh, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
  • Prof. Dr. Hartmut Leppin, Professor für Alte Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Exzellenzcluster „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. Bernhard Jussen, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Mittelalterliche Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple, Professor für Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften und dem SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime"

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Weitere Informationen: Mehr...

Was ist ein sozialer Prozess?

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

20. April 2016

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Knöbl (Direktor des Hamburger Instituts für Sozialforschung)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10

Abstract
Die Sozialwissenschaften haben seit ihrer Gründungsphase im 19. Jahrhundert zu ihrem begrifflichen Handwerkszeug stets    Prozessbegriffe wie diejenigen der Differenzierung oder der Individualisierung gezählt, mit denen man hoffte, fundamentale soziale Veränderungen fassen zu können. Unklar blieb dabei häufig, ob jeglicher sozialer Wandel als ein Prozess gefasst werden müsse und – wenn dies  nicht der Fall sein  sollte – was dann eigentlich die Prozesshaftigkeit eines Prozesses genau ausmache. Diese Unklarheiten rächen sich heute insofern, als seit einiger Zeit nicht wenige dieser Prozessbegriffe (siehe etwa die  derzeitigen Auseinandersetzungen um „Säkularisierung“) einer fundamentalen empirischen Kritik unterzogen werden, ohne dass  sozialwissenschaftliche Theorien hierauf schon  eine überzeugende Antwort gefunden hätten.
Der Vortrag versucht anhand der Analyse vergangener und gegenwärtiger historischer wie soziologischer Diskussionen um den Prozessbegriff unterschiedliche   theoretische   Herangehensweisen zu typisieren, deren Stärken und Schwächen zu benennen, und dann auch zu fragen, wie das Verhältnis von Prozess und Narrativität zu bestimmen ist.

CV

Wolfgang Knöbl ist seit 2015 Direktor des Hamburger Instituts für Sozialforschung. Zwischen 2002 und 2015 war er Professor für  international vergleichende Sozialwissenschaften der Georg-August-Universität Göttingen und in dieser Zeit unter anderem auch Gastprofessor an der University of Toronto/Kanada und Fellow am Freiburg Institute for  Advanced  Studies  (FRIAS)  und  am  Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien der Universität Erfurt. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der politischen und historisch-komparativen Soziologie, der Sozialtheorie und  der  Geschichte  der  Soziologie.  Zu den Publikationen der letzten Jahre zählen: Die Kontingenz der Moderne. Wege in Europa, Asien und Amerika, Frankfurt a. M. und New York 2007; Kriegsverdrängung. Ein Problem in der Geschichte der Sozialtheorie (zusammen mit Hans Joas), Frankfurt a. M. 2008; Handbuch Moderneforschung (herausgegeben zusammen mit Friedrich Jaeger und Ute Schneider), Stuttgart 2015.

Video:

Audio:

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Knöbl (Direktor des Hamburger Instituts für Sozialforschung)
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Bernhard Jussen, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Mittelalterliche Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Julika Griem, Professorin am Institut für England und Amerikastudien der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Assoziiertes Mitglied des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Jonathan Klein, Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Hartmut Leppin, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Alte Geschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Bernhard Jussen, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Mittelalterliche Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Forschungszentrum Historische Geisteswissenschaften und dem SFB "Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime"

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Weitere Informationen: Mehr...

Norm Conflicts in Pluralistic Societies

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Cultural diversity is just as characteristic ofmodern pluralistic societies as differences in lifestyle, sexual orientation and worldview. The question no longer is whether homogenization or increased heterogeneity is desirable (Appadurai), but rather how plurality can be managed and conflicting norms be negotiated. In the social sciences and humanities the possible effects of social pluralization (desolidarization, hybridization, new forms of community formation) are discussed just as controversially as the possible measures to counteract these developments (tolerance, recognition, agreement on shared values). Conflicts currently center primarily on religious and gender norms (such as the head-scarf and caricature debates) in order to justify inclusions and exclusions and to construct collective identities. The lecture series will introduce and discuss new theoretical approaches and empirical findings on norm conflicts in pluralistic societies, particularly with respect to their potential to initiate normative change and the new ways they may socially integrate difference.

Programme:

28 October 2015

Prof. Dr. Alison Dundes Renteln (University of Southern California)
Recognizing the Human Right to a Name and the Implications for Giving and Changing Personal Names

11 November 2015
Prof. em. Dr. Rudolf Steinberg (Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main)
Toleranz und religiöse Pluralität am Beispiel von Kopftuch und Burka

25 November 2015
Dr. Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg (Dezernat XI - Intergration, Frankfurt am Main)
Chancen und Herausforderungen einer diversen Gesellschaft

2 December 2015
Prof. Dr. Olivier Roy (European University, Florence)
When and Why does a Religious Norm Become Unacceptable in the Public Space?

16 December 2015
Prof. Dr. Marie-Claire Foblets (Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung, Halle (Saale))
Accommodating Islam within the framework of Western Legal Thinking. An Impossible Mission?

20 January 2016
Prof. Dr. Kabir Tambar (Stanford University, California)
Brotherhood in Dispossession: State Violence and the Minority Question in Turkey

3 February 2016
Prof. Dr. Yüksel Sezgin (Syracuse University New York)
Democratizing “Shari’a”: How Liberal Democracies Apply and Regulate Muslim Family Laws

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Programme (pdf): click here...

Organisation: Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Previous Lecture Series: click here...

Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Kulturelle Diversität ist ebenso ein Merkmal moderner pluralistischer Gesellschaften wie Differenzen in Bezug auf Lebensstile, sexuelle Orientierungen und weltanschauliche Bekenntnisse. Die Frage lautet nicht mehr, ob Homogenisierung oder Heterogenisierungerwünscht sei (Appadurai), sondern wie Pluralität gestaltet und Normenkonflikte verhandelt werden können. In den Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaftenwerden die möglichen Effekte gesellschaftlicher Pluralisierung (Entsolidarisierung, Hybridisierung, neue Formen der Vergemeinschaftung) ebenso kontrovers diskutiert wie probate Lösungsansätze (z.B. Toleranz, Anerkennung, Verständigung auf gemeinsame Werte).
Auseinandersetzungen werden gegenwärtig vor allem um religiöse und Gendernormen geführt (u.a. Kopftuchdebatte, Karikaturenstreit), um Inklusionen und Exklusionen zu rechtfertigen und kollektive Identitäten zu konstruieren. Grundsätzlich stellt sich die Frage nach den  Rechtfertigungsnarrativen für bestimmte Normen bzw. nach konfligierenden Referenzrahmen (Menschenrechte vs. kulturelle Rechte, Abwägung unterschiedlicher Rechtsgüter), in denen Normen legitimiert oder delegitimiert werden.
Im Rahmen der Ringvorlesung sollen neue theoretische und empirische Befunde zu Normenkonflikten in pluralistischen Gesellschaften vorgestellt und debattiert werden, auch im Hinblick auf ihr Potential, Normenwandel und neue Formen der  Integration von Differenzen voranzutreiben.

28. Oktober 2015
Prof. Dr. Alison Dundes Renteln (University of Southern California)
Recognizing the Human Right to a Name and the Implications for Giving and Changing Personal Names

11. November 2015
Prof. em. Dr. Rudolf Steinberg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
Toleranz und religiöse Pluralität am Beispiel von Kopftuch und Burka

25. November 2015
Dr. Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg (Dezernat XI - Integration, Frankfurt am Main)
Chancen und Herausforderungen einer diversen Gesellschaft

2. Dezember 2015
Prof. Dr. Olivier Roy (European University, Florence)
When and Why does a Religious Norm Become Unacceptable in the Public Space?

16. Dezember 2015
Prof. Dr. Marie-Claire Foblets (Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung, Halle (Saale))
Accommodating Islam within the framework of Western Legal Thinking. An Impossible Mission?

20. Januar 2016
Prof. Dr. Kabir Tambar (Stanford University, California)
Brotherhood in Dispossession: State Violence and the Minority Question in Turkey

3. Februar 2016
Prof. Dr. Yüksel Sezgin (Syracuse University New York)
Democratizing “Shari’a”: How Liberal Democracies Apply and Regulate Muslim Family Laws

Jeweils 18.15 Uhr

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Programmbroschüre (pdf): Hier...

Organisation: Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Vorausgegangene Ringvorlesungen: Hier...

When and Why does a Religious Norm Become Unacceptable in the Public Space?

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Prof. Dr. Olivier Roy (European University, Florence)

2. Dezember 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
The debate on the place of Islam as a religion in Europe has been concentrated essentially on the issue of “religious signs” in the public sphere: mosque, veil, minarets. It extended to religious signs made “visible “ on bodies or food: hallal food, circumcision.
In the meantime, many court decisions and especially the European Court of Human rights considered that it was acceptable not to grant equality for religious signs in the public sphere: allowing the display of crucifi x in Italian schools, banning veil but not Christian attire (Germany, Swiss).
The issue is to understand what make here the religious norm acceptable or not. The argument of the courts are that the Christian signs are more cultural than religious. What does it say about the relationship of Religion, faith and culture in Europe?

CV
Olivier Roy, born in 1949, is joint chair at the inter-disciplinary Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies and the Department of Political and Social Sciences (European University Institute). He has been senior researcher in political science at the French National Centre for Scientific Research since 1985 and Professor at the École des hautes études en sciences sociale (EHESS), (School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences) in Paris since 2003.
In 1972 Roy received an “Agrégation” in philosophy and a MA in Persian language and civilization from the French Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales. Twenty-two years later he received a PhD in Political Science. In 1988 Roy was a consultant for the United Nations Office of the Coordinator for Afghanistan (UNOCA) and headed the OSCE’s Mission in Tajikistan between 1993 and 1994.
His extensive research interests and fi elds of expertise include the Middle East and Central Asia, especially Iran and Afghanistan. Roy is the author of the books Islam and Resistance in Afghanistan (1990), The Failure of Political Islam (1994), The Illusions of September 11. (2002), Globalized Islam (2004), and of numerous books about political Islam and religious fundamentalism. One of his best noted works, Secularism Confronts Islam (2007), offers a perspective on the experiences of Muslims in western secular society. He also serves on the editorial board of the academic journal Central Asian Survey, and in 2005 during the Paris riots he wrote about their non-religious causes. In 2010 he published the book Holy Ignorance, an analysis of the interdependence  between culture, religion, and ethnicity.

 

Video:

Audio:


Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Olivier Roy (European University, Florence)
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Democratizing “Shari’a”: How Liberal Democracies Apply and Regulate Muslim Family Laws

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Dr. Yüksel Sezgin (Syracuse University, New York)

3. Februar 2016, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
Many view the shortage of democracy in the Muslim world as an evidence of incompatibility between “shari’a” and democracy. Despite this, however, surveys show that most Muslims want both democracy and “shari’a”. Is this an oxymoronic demand? Are democracy and shari‘abased (family) laws inherently incompatible? Should a democratic regime automatically refuse to accommodate Muslim laws? These important philosophical and theoretical questions are of existential signifi cance for emerging democracies in the Muslim world. Given the overwhelming public support for MFLs, popularly elected
Muslim governments will most likely need to preserve and in some cases even introduce shari‘a-based family laws. But if popularly elected Muslim governments are to become “true” democracies, then they will need to fi nd a way to balance the accommodation of MFLs with basic human rights and rule of law. But can this be achieved at all? This is the main question that my current research project addresses through critical reexamination of prevailing
assumptions about democracy, secularism and shari‘a in the context of MFL systems in four “shari‘a applying” non-Muslim democracies-namely Israel, India, Greece and Ghana.

CV
Yüksel Sezgin is the director of the Middle East Studies Program and an assistant professor of political science at Maxwell School of Public Affairs, Syracuse University. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from University of Ankara, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of London (SOAS), and the University of Washington. He previously taught at the University of Washington, Harvard Divinity School, and the City University of New York, and held research positions at Princeton University, Columbia University, University of Bielefeld, American University in Cairo, and the University of Delhi. He is the author of Human Rights under State-Enforced Religious Family Laws in Israel, Egypt and India (Cambridge University Press, 2013) which
was awarded the 2014 Gordon Hirabayashi Human Rights Book Prize by American Sociological Association.

 

Video:

Audio:


Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Yüksel Sezgin (Syracuse University New York)
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Brotherhood in Dispossession: State Violence and the Minority Question in Turkey

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Prof. Dr. Kabir Tambar (Stanford University, California)

20. Januar 2016, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
The category of “minority” has been constitutive of “the people” in Turkey, distilling those who do not belong to the history and destiny of the nation from those who do. “Minority,” in this sense, is not simply a demographic classifi cation, nor merely a matter of legal recognition. It carries the weight of a historical judgment, which scaffolds ethical community by delineating which populations, languages, and religions remain outside of the framework of collective obligation and responsibility. This paper examines comments delivered by a pro-Kurdish political party and a largely Kurdish mothers-ofthe-disappeared group during the Gezi Park protests of 2013. These moments of public address participated in the broader spirit of state critique on display during those protests. They were noteworthy, however, for recasting the Gezi events as a late moment in a longer history of state violence, prefi gured by a century of dispossession experienced by those who have been classed as minorities or threatened with that designation. The commentaries interrogated what we might call the negative historicity of the minority. They were not primarily aimed at repudiating that historical judgment as discriminatory or contrary to law, but instead sought to delocalize the judgment vested in the category of minority, to see in that judgment an increasingly generalized economy of political abjection, and in effect to view it as prefiguring an ethical community to come.

CV
Kabir Tambar is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. He has also taught in the Department of Religion at the University of Vermont and was a member in the School of Social Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in 2011-2012. His work has largely centered on Turkey and has explored questions of citizenship, minority politics, and religion. This research led to the publication of a book, The Reckoning of Pluralism: Political Belonging and the Demands of History in Turkey (Stanford University Press, 2014). Tambar has also begun new research on emergency rule and the politics of state coercion.

 

Video:

Audio:



(Durch eine technische Störung während der Aufzeichnung ist die Tonqualität zwischen Minute 9 und 16 beeinträchtigt)

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Kabir Tambar (Stanford University, California)
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Accommodating Islam within the framework of Western Legal Thinking. An Impossible Mission?

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Prof. Dr. Marie-Claire Foblets (Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung, Halle (Saale))

16. Dezember 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
For some years now in Europe, Islam and above all those legal systems that transpose it into the positive law of a given State have been increasingly problematized. The grounds adduced are generally that the values underlying Islam are on several points incompatible with those dictated by human rights as interpreted in the domestic law of European democratic States.
In this exposé, I will seek to nuance this view of the situation, not because I consider that there are no problems of compatibility between, on the one hand, certain values presented as specific to legal systems inspired by Islam, and on the other, the foundations of the domestic law of most European countries; rather, I would argue that such a reading risks being too narrowly focused on confl ctsituations alone.
My presentation will therefore not limit itself to a discussion of conflicts, i.e. incompatibilities, but will take a more constructive view, showing how Islam and
the legal systems it informs can for certain specifi c problems offer solutions that have no equivalent in the domestic positive law of European countries. By the same token, I will suggest that it would be a shame to allow the problematic aspects to dominate, and thus obscure, the encounter between Islam and European domestic legal orders. Case law indicates that it is possible to accommodate the different normativities without this being to the detriment of respect for the constitutional principles of the European countries concerned. I will provide several illustrations.

CV
Marie-Claire Foblets, Lic. Iur., Lic. Phil., Ph. D. Anthrop. (Belgium) was for many years professor of Anthropology and of Law at the Universities of Leuven (Louvain) and Antwerp. She has held various visiting professorships both within and outside Europe. From 2005 to 2008 she served as Head of the ‘Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology’ at the Catholic University of Leuven, and from 2009 to 2012 she chaired the ‘Institute for Migration Law and Legal Anthropology’ at the Law Faculty in Leuven. In 2012 she joined the German Max Planck Society, to become Director of the newly established Department of Law and Anthropology, within the Institute of Social Anthropology in Halle a/d Saale. She has done extensive research and published widely on issues of migration law, including the elaboration of European migration law after the Treaty of Amsterdam (multi-layered governance), citizenship/nationality laws, compulsory integration policies, anti-racism and nondiscrimination. In the field of anthropology of law, her research focuses on cultural diversity and legal practice, with special interest in the application of Islamic family law in Europe, and more recently in the accommodation of cultural and religious diversity under State law.
In 2001 she was elected member of the Royal Academy of Sciences and Arts (Flanders/Belgium). She is also an honorary member of the Brussels bar. In 2004 she received the Francqui Prize, the most distinguished scientifi c award in the humanities in Belgium.

 

Video:

Audio:


Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Marie-Claire Foblets (Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung, Halle (Saale))
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Chancen und Herausforderungen einer diversen Gesellschaft

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Dr. Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg (Dezernat XI - Intergration, Frankfurt am Main)

25. November 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
Frankfurt ist die Stadt der Vielfalt. In ihr leben Menschen unterschiedlichster Herkunft, Sprachen, Geschichte, Lebenserfahrung, Weltanschauung und sexueller Identität auf engstem Raum. Die Gestaltung dieser Vielfalt erscheint zunächst als eine ungeheure Herausforderung, treffen hier doch  unterschiedlichste Normen und Wertesysteme aufeinander. Zugleich ist Frankfurt geprägt vom Verständnis, gemeinsam in Vielfalt zu leben.
Sicherlich gehört Frankfurt, auch aufgrund seiner Geschichte und seiner Infrastruktur, zu einer der weltoffensten Städte überhaupt. Aber auch hier bedarf die Gestaltung der vorhandenen Vielfalt eines permanenten Aushandlungsprozesses auf verschiedenen Ebenen. Es geht um die Bildung von Identität(en) und es geht um die Frage von Umverteilung und Teilhabe: Innerhalb der Bevölkerung, aber auch innerhalb der Politik und Verwaltung. Vielfalt ist aber nicht nur eine Herausforderung, sondern auch eine Chance für Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft.
Die Gründung eines eigenen Integrationsdezernats und des ihm  zugordneten Amtes für multikulturelle Angelegenheiten sowie die Verabschiedung des Frankfurter Integrations- und Diversitätskonzepts sind Beispiele für Aushandlungsprozesse auf politisch-administrativer Ebene. Sie haben einen Strukturwandel eingeleitet und ein neues Bewusstsein dafür geschaffen, dass Vielfalt gestaltet werden muss und dass diese Gestaltung eine Chance sein kann.

CV
Stadträtin Dr. Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg wurde 1965 in Teheran geboren, ist deutsche Kommunalpolitikerin (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen) und seit 2008 Dezernentin für Integration sowie Mitglied des Magistrats der Stadt Frankfurt am Main. Als Leiterin des Dezernats XI fallen das Amt für multikulturelle Angelegenheiten (AMKA) und die kommunale Ausländer- und Ausländerinnenvertretung der Stadt Frankfurt am Main (KAV) in ihren Zuständigkeitsbereich.
Dabei tritt sie für eine tolerante und weltoffene Stadt ein, in der Menschen sich mit all ihrer Vielfalt zugehörig und gleichberechtigt fühlen können und an einem friedlichen Miteinander teilhaben. Mit Hochschuldiplomabschluss in Psychologie hat sie sich als Psychotherapeutin mit eigener Praxis niedergelassen. Sie ist Leiterin der Beratungsstelle für ältere Migrantinnen und Migranten (HIWA) beim Deutschen Roten Kreuz, saß von 2001 bis 2008 für die Grünen im Stadtparlament und hatte den Vorsitz des Integrationsausschusses inne.

Video:

Audio:



Bildergalerie:

  • Dr. Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg (Dezernat XI - Integration, Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter (Professorin für Ethnologie kolonialer und postkolonialer Ordnungen an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Direktorin des Instituts für Ethnologie, Leiterin des Frankfurter Forschungszentrums globaler Islam (FFGI))

Toleranz und religiöse Pluralität am Beispiel von Kopftuch und Burka

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Prof. em. Dr. Rudolf Steinberg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

11. November 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
Über das Tragen eines muslimischen Kopftuchs und einer Burka/Niqab fi nden in Deutschland wie in anderen europäischen Ländern heftige Diskussionen
statt. Nachdem einige Landesgesetzgeber Lehrerinnen das Tragen eines Kopftuchs in der staatlichen Schule verboten hatten, befasste sich zweimal das Bundesverfassungsgericht mit zum Teil unterschiedlichen Aussagen mit dem Thema. Die Billigung des französischen Verbots eines Vollschleiers in der Öffentlichkeit durch den Europäischen Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte hat auch in Deutschland zu der Forderung nach einem derartigen Verbot geführt.
Nachdem zentrale Aspekte der genannten Entscheidungen kurz dargestellt werden, soll die Problematik vor allem unter dem Aspekt der Toleranz diskutiert werden. Was bedeutet Toleranz in dem fraglichen Zusammenhang und welche Rolle spielte der Terminus in dieser Rechtsprechung?
Der Referent interessiert sich aber vor allem für die Grenzen von Toleranz. Er untersucht, woraus und wie sich Schranken herleiten lassen. Grenzen ergeben sich aus der Verfassung, den Konzepten über die Rolle von Religion in Staat und Gesellschaft – dem Maß von Laizität –, aber auch dem ordre public mit den Vorstellungen relativer gesellschaftlicher Homogenität. Hierbei sind Topoi zu entwickeln, die nicht gleichsam apriorisch bestehen, sondern nur das Ergebnis eines offenen Diskurses sein können. Es kann deshalb nicht überraschen, dass sich die Antworten auf die Fragen in verschiedenen Ländern trotz
ähnlicher verfassungsrechtlicher Ausgangslage unterscheiden.

CV

Rudolf Steinberg, geb. 1943, legte nach dem Studium der Volkswirtschaftslehre und der Rechtswissenschaft an den Universitäten in Freiburg i.Br. und Köln sowie der Politikwissenschaft in Ann Arbor (Mich., USA) die beiden juristischen Staatsprüfungen ab und wurde an der Rechtswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Universität Freiburg i.Br. promoviert und habilitiert. Nach einer Professur an der Universität Hannover nahm er 1980 einen Ruf auf die Professur für Öffentliches Recht, Umweltrecht und Verwaltungswissenschaften an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main an, als deren Präsident er von 2000 bis Ende 2008 tätig war. Er war von 1995 bis 2000 Richter am Thüringer Verfassungsgerichtshof in Weimar. Heute nimmt er eine Reihe von Ehrenämtern war. So ist er Vorsitzender des Stiftungsrats des Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Vorsitzender des Kuratoriums der Polytechnischen Gesellschaft; Mitglied im Verwaltungsrat der Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung und Mitglied im Vorstand der Freunde und Förderer der Goethe-Universität. Wissenschaftlich hat er sich vor allem mit der Theorie der Interessenverbände, Verfassungsfragen und Themen des Umwelt- und Planungsrechts befasst. Aus seinen zahlreichen Veröffentlichungen seien genannt: Staat und Verbände, 1985; Der ökologische Verfassungsstaat, 1998; Fachplanung, 4. Aufl . 2012; Die Repräsentation des Volkes – Menschenbild und demokratisches Regierungssystem, 2013.

 

Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

 

Recognizing the Human Right to a Name and the Implications for Giving and Changing Personal Names

Ringvorlesung "Normenkonflikte in pluralistischen Gesellschaften" des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Prof. Dr. Alison Dundes Renteln (University of Southern California)

28. Oktober 2015,. 18.15 Uhr
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ 10

Abstract
Personal names generate confl ict in pluralistic societies because names are intimately connected to conceptions of the self. They serve as important symbolic representations of individual identity and as a crucial tool for documentation of persons residing within state borders. Laws governing names also function as a form of social control. For immigrants the choice of fi rst names may be especially controversial because naming customs reflect
deeply held values. This analysis considers the extent to which the right to a name is protected under international law and general principles like privacy and freedom of expression and how such a right ought to be construed. After establishing the jurisprudential status of the right to a name, we investigate disputes from various countries involving the parental naming of children and individuals who challenge government policies that force them to take their husbands’ surnames. Regulations governing the choice and use of names in pluralistic societies illustrate the limits of law. This project demonstrates the importance of onomastics and anthroponymy for sociolegal studies.

CV

Alison Dundes Renteln is a Professor of Political Science, Anthropology, Law, and Public Policy at the University of Southern California where she teaches Law and Public Policy with an emphasis on comparative and international law. She has a BA in (Modern Europe) from Harvard, a Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California, Berkeley and a J.D. from USC. For three decades she has analyzed cultural confl icts in domestic and international legal systems and proposed policies designed to address these. Her publications include The Cultural Defense (Oxford, 2004), Folk Law (University of Wisconsin, 1995), Multicultural Jurisprudence (Hart, 2009), and Cultural Law (Cambridge, 2010), and Global Bioethics and Human Rights (Rowman & Littlefi eld, 2014) and numerous articles. She has enjoyed teaching judges, lawyers, court interpreters, jury consultants, and police offi cers. Renteln also collaborated with the UN on the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, lectured on comparative legal ethics in Bangkok and Manila at conferences sponsored by the American Bar Association, and served on California civil rights commissions and a Human Rights Watch committee. She was a Fellow at Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and at the School of Advanced Study at the University of London. Her current research focuses on the intersection between sensory studies and socio-legal studies.

 Video:

Audio:

 

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Alison Dundes Renteln (University of Southern California)

Lecture Series "Theorizing Global Order"

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Theorizing (i)nternational (r)elations (capital and small letters) presupposes a conception of what the subject matter and its bounds actually is all about. We have to have some idea of the entity at the center of our theorizing – usually related to the “international” and some “relations” which connect political communities and/or human beings. Notions such as “international system” therefore refer to some “whole” which delimits the horizon of the political in spatial terms. It also establishes an inevitable a priori fixation or foundation for theorizing in IR.

“Order” – as in “world order” or “global order” – is another concept for grasping this “whole”. In abstract terms we take it to refer to a bounded realm or arrangement consisting of connected parts which have to cohere in some fashion. World order conceptions thus refer to an imagined whole which is structured internally by certain principles (eg. “sovereignty”, “balance of power”) and dynamics (eg. “power politics”, juridification). Human thought and practices shape (our understandings of) these orders. For this reason conceptions of order are not fixed. They depend on prevailing practices of community formation, structures of intercommunal interaction and our very beliefs about these practices. Moreover, political order thus conceived is inherently normative. To speak of some order as being (more or less) “orderly” or, alternatively, of being “better” or “worse” from a normative point of view represents a category mistake.

For a long time, prevailing conceptions of “western” IR could have been read as having committed such a category mistake since “order” – widely conceived to be “the central problem of IR” as a discipline (Ikenberry) – has often been regarded as the opposite of “disorder” or “anarchy”. During the past decades this perspective has been challenged and criticized on many fronts. In this Lecture Series scholars with different backgrounds and theoretical preferences will offer a fresh look on what it may mean to “theorize global order”.

Prof. Gunther Hellmann

Programme:

29 April 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, University of Victoria, Canada
The Modern International: A Scalar Politics of Divided Subjectivities

13 May 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. Pinar Bilgin, Bilkent University, Ankara
The International in Security

27 May 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. Iver Neumann, London School of Economics and Political Science
Diplomacy as Global Governance

10 June 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. Chris Reus-Smit, University of Queensland, Australia
Cultural Diversity and International Order

24 June 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. Erik Ringmar, Lund University, Sweden
Nomadic Political Theory

8 July 2015, 6.15pm
Prof. Siddhharth Mallavarapu, South Asian University, New Delhi
The Sociology of International Relations in India: Contested Readings of Global Political Order

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

Past: click here...

Ringvorlesung "Theorizing Global Order"

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

“Order” is a central concept in the discipline of International Relations. However, in contrast to other concepts (such as “security”) it is surprisingly undertheorized. In this Lecture Series scholars with different backgrounds and theoretical preferences will offer their take on what it may mean to “theorize global order".

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

29. April 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, University of Victoria, Canada
The Modern International: A Scalar Politics of Divided Subjectivities

13. Mai 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Pinar Bilgin, Bilkent University, Ankara
The International in Security

27. Mai 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Iver Neumann, London School of Economics and Political Science
Diplomacy as Global Governance

10. Juni 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Chris Reus-Smit, University of Queensland, Australia
Cultural Diversity and International Order

24. Juni 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Erik Ringmar, Lund University, Sweden
Nomadic Political Theory

8. Juli 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Siddhharth Mallavarapu, South Asian University, New Delhi
The Sociology of International Relations in India: Contested Readings of Global Political Order

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Programmbroschüre: Hier...

Vorausgegangene Ringvorlesungen: Hier...

The Sociology of International Relations in India: Contested Readings of Global Political Order

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. Siddharth Mallavarapu, South Asian University, New Delhi

Abstract

The objective of this lecture is to examine the broader sociology of the discipline of International Relations (IR) in India. I do this by consciously turning towards the disciplinary history of the Indian variant of IR while situating it against the backdrop of comparative disciplinary histories of IR. I argue that the specificities of context left an indelible imprint on the make-up of the Indian variant of the discipline and this is most evident in the preferences exercised by scholars in the early years of Indian IR scholarship. One valuable point of entry to gauge particular slants of emphases in IR from India is the manner in which the question of international political order was theorized from this setting. Drawing on both implicit and explicit treatments of this question, I both juxtapose and reflect on distinct images of political order viewed in terms of India’s relations with the world theorized by an assorted bunch of scholars drawn from different generations of Indian IR scholarship. I argue that competing conceptions of political order often served as the backdrop for shared bonds as well as animated disagreements among particular constituencies of Indian IR scholarship.

CV

Siddharth Mallavarapu is currently Associate Professor and Chairperson, Department of International Relations at the South Asian University. His prior publications include a single author book titled Banning the Bomb: The Politics of Norm Creation (2002), two co-edited books (with Kanti Bajpai) on International Relations in India 2005) and another (with B. S. Chimni) titled International Relations: Perspectives for the Global South (2012) besides other journal contributions. His research interests include disciplinary histories of International Relations, the politics and episteme of the global south, the theory and practice of global governance and evaluations of both mainstream and critical approaches to the study of world politics. He has also been featured in February 2014 on Theory Talks.

Video:

Audio:



Gallery:

  • Prof. Siddharth Mallavarapu, South Asian University, New Delhi
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft mit dem Schwerpunkt Außenbeziehungen Deutschlands und der Europäischen Union der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

8 July 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

Nomadic Political Theory

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. Erik Ringmar, Lund University, Sweden

Abstract

This lecture examines the way nomadic peoples have been treated throughout history by sedentary peoples, but also the way nomadsArabs, Mongols, etc. – have built empires founded on an alternative, non-territorial, basis. This historical discussion will provide the basis for an argument about life in a post-territorial future. Nomads, the thesis will be, can teach us a lot about how international politics will be organized in the future.

CV

Erik Ringmar teaches political science and international relations at the University of Lund, Sweden. He has a PhD from Yale University, and taught for 12 years in the Government Department at the LSE in London. He has also worked in China for seven years, the last two years as professor of international relations at Shanghai Jiaotong University in Shanghai. He has written four academic books and some forty research articles. His most recent book is Liberal Barbarism: The European Destruction of the Palace of the Emperor of China (2013).

 

Video:

 

Audio:

 

Gallery:

  • Prof. Erik Ringmar, Lund University, Sweden

 

24 June 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

Cultural Diversity and International Order

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. Chris Reus-Smit, University of Queensland, Australia

Abstract

There is considerable anxiety in Western capitals about the rise of non-Western powers. While this stems in part from a fear of the instability that often accompanies great power transitions, at root it is a cultural anxiety, a fear that non-Western powers will promote values and practices that erode the modern international order. This resonates with the extant literature in IR, which sees international orders emerging in unitary cultural contexts and diversity as corrosive. Yet such views are deeply problematic. Virtually all international orders emerged in highly diverse cultural contexts, and managing diversity has been a key imperative of institution building. Moreover, the ‘cultural disciplines’ (anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, etc.) now see cultures as highly variegated, contested, and interpenetrated. This all suggests that cultural diversity shapes political orders in complex ways, constitutive and subversive. The challenge is to better understand these complexities, and to cultivate practices that sustain order while fostering global cultural diversity. This lecture explores these issues and maps a research agenda on cultural diversity and international order.

CV

Chris Reus-Smit holds the Chair in International Relations at the University of Queensland, Australia. He is the author of Individual Rights and the Making of the International System (2013), American Power and World Order (2004) and The Moral Purpose of the State (1999); co-author of Special Responsibilities in World Politics (2012); editor of The Politics of International Law (2004); and co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of International Relations (2008), Resolving International Crises of Legitimacy (Special issue of International Politics 2007), and Between Sovereignty and Global Governance (1998). Professor Reus-Smit co-edits the Cambridge Studies in International Relations books series, the journal International Theory, and a new twelve volume series of Oxford Handbooks of International Relations. Prior to joining the University of Queensland, Professor Reus-Smit held Chairs at the European University Institute and the Australian National University (where he was Head of the Department of IR from 2001 to 2010).

Video:

Audio:

 

Gallery:

  • Prof. Chris Reus-Smit, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft mit dem Schwerpunkt Außenbeziehungen Deutschlands und der Europäischen Union der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

10 June 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

Diplomacy as Global Governance

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. Iver Neumann, London School of Economics and Political Science

Abstract

If internationalization is the process of ever closer relations between states, then the institution of diplomacy was certainly essential to its evolution. This lecture begins with the observation that, with a handful of exceptions (eg. a volume edited by Andrew Cooper, William Maley and John English), diplomacy has not been much discussed in the context of internationalism‘s successor, globalization. The assumption seems to be that, as agents proliferate to include not only states, but also non-state actors, diplomacy is left behind. I argue the opposite, that diplomacy adapts and plays an important role in globalization, but in a way that transforms diplomacy in significant ways. Two case studies of diplomatic practice – peace and reconciliation, and also humanitarian diplomacy – demonstrate that, rather than leaving the scene to other agents, diplomats are actually working through these agents. As a result, diplomacy has begun to change away from being about negotiation and representation towards being about governance. Precisely because diplomats work through other agents, however, diplomats become dependent on other actors to perform tasks that are expected of them.

CV

Iver B. Neumann (b. 1959), Dr. Phil. (Oxon, Politics 1992), Dr. Philos. (Oslo, Social Anthropology, 2009) is Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was formerly Director of Research at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs. He was the editor of Cooperation and Conflict. Nordic Journal of International Relations 1999-2001 and Professor in Russian Studies, Oslo University, 2005-2010. Among his fourteen books are Governing the Global Polity (2010, with Ole Jacob Sending) and At Home with the Diplomats: Inside A European Foreign Ministry (2012).

 

Video:

 

Audio:

 

Gallery:

  • Prof. Iver Neumann, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft mit dem Schwerpunkt Außenbeziehungen Deutschlands und der Europäischen Union der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Jens Steffek, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen", Technische Universität Darmstadt

 

27 May 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

The International in Security

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. Pinar Bilgin, Bilkent University, Ankara

Abstract

How to think about security in a world of multiple differences? In this lecture, I build on the contributions of Critical Security Studies (defined broadly) and draw upon the insights of Postcolonial IR to suggest that thinking about security in a world of multiple differences entails inquiring into the international in security and security in the international. By ‘inquiring into the international in security’, I refer to the need for incorporating others’ conceptions of the international into the study of security. By ‘others’, I mean those who happen not to be located on or near the top of hierarchies in world politics, thereby having less influence in shaping various dynamics (including their own portrayal in world politics). By ‘inquiring into security in the international’, I point to the need to understand how others’ insecurities shape (as they are shaped by) their conceptions of the international (including IR scholarship).

CV

Pinar Bilgin is Associate Professor of International Relations at Bilkent University, Turkey. She is the author of Regional Security in the Middle East: a Critical Perspective (2005), The International in Security, Security in the International (forthcoming). Her articles have appeared in Review of International Studies, Political Geography, European Journal of Political Research, Third World Quarterly, Security Dialogue, International Political Sociology, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Relations and Geopolitics. She is an Associate Member of Turkish Academy of Sciences, Associate Editor of International Political Sociology. Her research agenda focuses on critical approaches to security studies. She has served as the founding governing board member of the European International Studies Association, past president of Central and East European International Studies Association, past chair of the International Political Sociology section of the International Studies Association. She is a member of the editorial board of Security Dialogue, Geopolitics, International Studies Quarterly, Mediterranean Politics, Global Discourse, and ID: International Dialogue.

 Video:

 

Audio:

 

Gallery:

  • Prof. Pinar Bilgin (Bilkent University, Ankara)
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann (Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Pinar Bilgin (Bilkent University, Ankara)

 

13 May 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

The Modern International: A Scalar Politics of Divided Subjectivities

Lecture Series Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Prof. R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, University of Victoria, Canada

Abstract

Debates about relations between problematic concepts of order, global and theorization are now shaped by shared but conflicting commitments to modern principles of subjectivity and self-determination. These commitments rest on specific claims about spatiotemporal origins and boundaries. The consequence is a structure of spatiotemporally organized contradictions expressed in aporetic claims to humanity and citizenship, and thus in the contested status of sovereignties expressed in state law and international law. Prevailing literatures usually erase the significance of the spatiotemporal, normative and contradictory character of this historical constitution of modern politics, partly by recasting internal and external moments of subjectivity as distinct spatial, temporal and hierarchical domains, partly by identifying specific practices through which contradictions are negotiated as the primary problem that must be engaged. To the contrary, I argue that the core source of order and disorder remains the status of claims about modern subjectivity expressed in political practices that must try, and fail, to reconcile claims about liberty, equality and security within a scalar hierarchy.

CV
R. B. J. (Rob) Walker is Professor of Political Science and of Cultural, Social and Political Thought at the University of Victoria in Canada and Professor Associado at the Instituto de Relações Internationais, Pontifica Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. He is the long-term Editor of the journal Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, and the founding Co-Editor of the journal International Political Sociology. His most recent publications include After the Globe, Before the World (2010) and Out of Line: Essays on the Politics of Boundaries and the Limits of Modern Politics (forthcoming in August 2015).

Video


Audio



 Bildergalerie

  • Prof. R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann, Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politikwissenschaft an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

29 April 2015, 6.15pm

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ6

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Brochure: click here...

Lecture Series "Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers"

Throughout history, law and legal knowledge were circulating between cultures, countries, and continents. Sometimes willingly adopted, sometimes forcefully imposed by powers from outside, the process of dealing with foreign law often changed not only the sources of law, but a whole structure of normative thinking. One might think of the reception of Roman law in Europe during the Middle Ages, the formation of derecho indiano in early modern Hispano-America or the adoption of European law in East Asia during the 19th century. In recent years, such processes could be observed in states in transition, for example in Eastern Europe.

As most normative orders, law is not only produced by politics, but it is rooted in language and traditions. Is it actually possible to translate norms? What happens when they are taken up by a different culture, having to operate in another language? How does their meaning shift during these processes, how do their function and even their normativity change?

The lecture series, which will try to find answers to these questions, is inspired by the concept of “cultural translation”. This term aims to supersede the notion of a linear give-and-take; instead, it emphasizes interactions and intermediate areas, internal dynamics, resistance and the “agency” of the actors. In a critical reflection of the traditional Eurocentric perspective, the concept of “translation” reminds us how complex, intertwined, and contested the adoption and re-production of foreign norms might be.

We do not only focus on legal normativity. While one lecture will explicitly discuss the translatability of law and legal norms, the other lectures shall deal with different forms of normativity as to be found in political concepts, religion and technology. Broadening the view in this way should enable us to compare normative orders and to examine how cultural translation actually “worked” in different fields. This might, eventually, produce a profounder understanding not only of law but also of normativity in general.

Prof. Thomas Duve
Dr. Lena Foljanty

Programme (pdf): click here...

Programme:

4 December 2014, 6.15pm
Dr. Simone Glanert
(Kent Law School, UK)
One European private law, more than one language: in vindication of Goethe

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino, 1801
For further information: click here...

16 December 2014, 6.15pm
Prof. Dagmar Schäfer (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berin)
Das ethische Produkt, oder wie man Moral in Material übersetzt. Regeln für Herrscher von Qiu Jun (1421-1495)
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, HZ10
For further information: click here...

20 January 2015, 6.15pm
Javier Ferndández Sebastián (Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain)
Translating political vocabularies in the Iberian Atlantic. Historical semantics and conceptual transfer
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, HZ11
For further information: click here...

5 February 20156.15pm
Peter Burke (University of Cambridge, UK)
Translating norms: strenghts and weaknesses of a concept
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino 1801
For further information: click here...

Presented:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of normative Orders"

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders" in special cooperation with the partner of the Cluster of Excellence, the "Max Planck Institute for European Legal History"

Poster (pdf): click here...

Previous Lecture Series: click here...

Ringvorlesung "Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers"

Throughout history, law and legal knowledge were circulating between cultures, countries, and continents. Sometimes willingly adopted, sometimes forcefully imposed by powers from outside, the process of dealing with foreign law often changed not only the sources of law, but a whole structure of normative thinking. One might think of the reception of Roman law in Europe during the Middle Ages, the formation of derecho indiano in early modern Hispano-America or the adoption of European law in East Asia during the 19th century. In recent years, such processes could be observed in states in transition, for example in Eastern Europe.

As most normative orders, law is not only produced by politics, but it is rooted in language and traditions. Is it actually possible to translate norms? What happens when they are taken up by a different culture, having to operate in another language? How does their meaning shift during these processes, how do their function and even their normativity change?

The lecture series, which will try to find answers to these questions, is inspired by the concept of “cultural translation”. This term aims to supersede the notion of a linear give-and-take; instead, it emphasizes interactions and intermediate areas, internal dynamics, resistance and the “agency” of the actors. In a critical reflection of the traditional Eurocentric perspective, the concept of “translation” reminds us how complex, intertwined, and contested the adoption and re-production of foreign norms might be.

We do not only focus on legal normativity. While one lecture will explicitly discuss the translatability of law and legal norms, the other lectures shall deal with different forms of normativity as to be found in political concepts, religion and technology. Broadening the view in this way should enable us to compare normative orders and to examine how cultural translation actually “worked” in different fields. This might, eventually, produce a profounder understanding not only of law but also of normativity in general.

Prof. Thomas Duve
Dr. Lena Foljanty

Programm (pdf): Hier...

Programm:

4. Dezember 2014, 18.15 Uhr
Dr. Simone Glanert (Kent Law School, UK)
One European private law, more than one language: in vindication of Goethe
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino, 1801
Weitere Informationen: Hier...

16. Dezember 2014, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Dagmar Schäfer (Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin)
Das ethische Produkt, oder wie man Moral in Material übersetzt. Regeln für Herrscher von Qiu Jun (1421-1495)
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ10
Weitere Informationen: Hier...

20. Januar 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Javier Ferndández Sebastián (Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain)
Translating political vocabularies in the Iberian Atlantic. Historical semantics and conceptual transfer
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ11
Weitere Informationen: Hier...

5. Februar 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Peter Burke (University of Cambridge, UK)
Translating norms: strenghts and weaknesses of a concept
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino 1801
Weitere Informationen: Hier...

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Partner des Exzellenzclusters, dem Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte


Plakat (pdf): Hier...


Vorangegangene Ringvorlesungen: Hier...

Translating norms: strenghts and weaknesses of a concept

Ringvorlesung "Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers"

5. Februar 2014, 18.15 Uhr
Peter Burke (University of Cambridge, UK)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino 1801

Video:

Audio:

 

Abstract
‘Cultural translation’ is one of a cluster of concepts such as ‘transfer’, ‘exchange’ and ‘hybridization’, that has come into use to describe cultural change (in domains such as language, architecture, music, religion and so on). Like its competitors, it has advantages and disadvantages.
The model of translation between languages has at least two advantages. Compared with ‘transfer’, it emphasizes the point that what travels changes. In the second place, the model has the advantage of emphasizing agency, the conscious adaptation of a text to a new context. Of course the model itself needs adaptation when it is used to discuss other kinds of cultural change, for example the work of missionaries in a culture very different from their own. There are obvious differences between translating forms, as in the case of architecture, and translating knowledge or ideas, when the problem of contradiction may arise. The problems of translation from one region to another, from one medium to another and from one domain to another are rather different.
Translators like other people follow norms in their work, while norms like forms or ideas can be transated. In the case of law, one thinks of the problems of translating laws from one language to another, of the translation of oral custom into written law, and of imposing laws formulated in one context or culture in a different context or culture.
Despite its advantages, the model of cultural translation is not universally applicable. Like other paradigms, perhaps all paradigms, it casts shadows as well as light. What it does not illuminate (essentially changes that are not the result of conscious action) requires other concepts such as ‘hybridization’ or ‘habitus’.

CV
Peter Burke studied at Oxford and taught at the new University of Sussex (1962-78) before moving to Cambridge, where he became Professor of Cultural History. He retired from the Chair in 2004 but remains a Life Fellow of Emmanuel College. He is also a Fellow of the British Academy, an Honorary Fellow of St John’s College Oxford, and has been awarded honorary degrees by the Universities of Lund, Copenhagen, Bucharest and Zürich. He has published 26 books and his work has so far been translated into 31 languages. For most of his career he has worked on the cultural and social history of early modern Europe, with some incursions into the 19th and 20th centuries.

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Peter Burke (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Duve, Professor für vergleichende Rechtsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Direktor des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte und Partner Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Dr. Lena Foljanty, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte
  • Dr. Lena Foljanty, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte
  • Dr. des. Daniel Föller, Post Doc des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Partner des Exzellenzclusters, dem Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte


 

 


Weitere Informationen: Hier...

Translating political vocabularies in the Iberian Atlantic. Historical semantics and conceptual transfers

Ringvorlesung "Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers"

20. Januar 2015, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Javier Fernández Sebastián (Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, HZ11

 
Video:

Audio:

 

Abstract
The Iberian Atlantic constitutes an interesting laboratory for studies of historical semantics, and in particular for the observation of the transfers of political and legal concepts in modern times. With one foot in Europe and the other in America, the Ibero-American world is part of so-called “western civilisation”. Understood as an ensemble that includes Iberia and Latin America, many question however the latter‘s belonging to the “West”. As well as the imprint of Christianity and classical culture, in addition to the presence of Spanish and Portuguese as main languages, one should bear in mind the considerable cultural diversity and the presistence of indigenous American languages in extensive rural areas. In any case, the fact that certain circumstances were experienced in the region far earlier than in other parts of the world – conquest, independence, republican and constitutional regimes – renders historical analysis of the circulation of political vocabulary exceptionally interesting. The aim of my lecture is to offer some general reflections (which I will attempt to illustrate with specific examples) upon this theme from the perspective of conceptual history.

CV

Javier Fernández Sebastián is Professor of History of Political Thought at the Universidad del País Vasco (Bilbao, Spain). He has published
extensively in the field of intellectual and conceptual history of modern politics. He has been fellow or visiting scholar at various universities
and research centres in Europe and the Americas, including the EHESS, the Université de la Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III, the Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte, the University of Cambridge, Harvard University and the Universidade de São Paulo. He is member of the editorial board of several Spanish and international journals, such as Revista de Estudios Políticos and Modern Intellectual History. Among his recent books are the edited volumes Concepts and Time. New Approaches to Conceptual History (2011) and La Aurora de la Libertad. Los primeros liberalismos en el mundo iberoamericano (2012), as well as the Diccionario político y social del mundo iberoamericano. Conceptos políticos fundamentales, 1770-1870 (2009 and 2014, 11 vols.), which is the result of an on-going transnational project on conceptual comparative history in the Iberian Atlantic (Iberconceptos).

Bildergalerie:

  •  Prof. Javier Fernández Sebastián (Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao, Spain)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Duve, Professor für vergleichende Rechtsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Direktor des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte und Partner Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  •  Dr. Lena Foljanty, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Partner des Exzellenzclusters, dem Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte



Weitere Informationen: Hier...

One European private law, more than one language: in vindication of Goethe

Ringvorlesung "Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers"

4. Dezember 2014, 18.15 Uhr
Dr. Simone Glanert (Kent Law School, UK)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino, 1801

Video:


Audio:


Abstract

Over the last decades, diverse task forces have sought to promote legal integration within the European Union. The most familiar endeavours are no doubt those of Ole Lando’s “Commission” and Christian von Bar’s “Study Group”. And it is well-known that the European Parliament has spoken in favour of a European Civil Code on various occasions and that the European Commission has provided financial sponsorship for some at least of the major projects. Although the idea of a European private law has generated considerable debate, the specific implications following upon the brand of legal uniformization being defended remain poorly appreciated. In order to yield a more insightful perspective on the proposed legal framework, I consider Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s idea of “Weltliteratur” – or world-literature – that he elaborated in 1827 in a context where leading German intellectuals felt it imperative to move the cultural agenda beyond the
narrow confines of parochial interests. The striking contrast between the two models of intercultural communication sheds light on the legal initiatives mentioned above. In particular, my comparative and interdisciplinary analysis points to the many translational problems arising from the development of uniform law in a plurilingual setting which are either ignored or downplayed by proponents of a European private law.

CV
Simone Glanert, a graduate of the Sorbonne and a former Rudolf B. Schlesinger Fellow at Cornell Law School, is a Senior Lecturer at Kent Law School (UK) where she teaches comparative law, French public law, and legal interpretation. She has acted as visiting professor in Grenoble, Montreal, and at the Sorbonne. Her research focuses on theoretical issues arising from the practice of comparison in the context of the globalization and Europeanization of laws. In this regard, Dr. Glanert’s monograph De la traductibilité du droit (Paris: Dalloz, 2011) critically assesses the possibilities and limits of legal translation from an interdisciplinary perspective. In addition, she recently edited Comparative Law – Engaging Translation (London: Routledge, 2014). Further, she acted as Guest Editor for a special issue on law and
translation just released by The Translator, a leading translation-studies journal. Other representative publications include “Foreign Law in Translation: If Truth Be Told...”, in Michael Freeman and Fiona Smith (eds), Current Legal Issues: Law and Language (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013; co-authored with Pierre Legrand) and “Method?”, in Pier G. Monateri (ed.), Methods of Comparative Law (Cheltenham, UK: Elgar, 2012).

Bildergalerie:

  • Dr. Simone Glanert (Kent Law School, UK)
  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Duve, Professor für vergleichende Rechtsgeschichte der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Direktor des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte und Partner Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Dr. Lena Foljanty, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin des Max-Planck-Instituts für europäische Rechtsgeschichte

 

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" in besonderer Zusammenarbeit mit dem Partner des Exzellenzclusters, dem Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte


 


Weitere Informationen: Hier...

Wirtschaftsverfassung oder Wirtschaftsdemokratie? Franz Böhm und Hugo Sinzheimer jenseits des Nationalstaates

Prof. Dr.  Gunther Teubner (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Mittwoch, 30.04.2014

Video:

Das Internet im globalen Konstitutionalismus

Prof. Dr. Ingolf Pernice (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

Mittwoch, 11.06.2014, 17 Uhr

Video:

Public International Law in Frankfurt

Prof. Dr. Michael Bothe  (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Mittwoch, 11.06.2014, 14:45 Uhr

Video:

Law and Finance - Neue Ansätze

Prof. Dr. Katharina Pistor  (Columbia Law School)

Mittwoch, 30.4.2014, 14 Uhr

Video:



The Future of Public International Law


Prof. Dr. Martti Koskenniemi (University of Helsinki)

Mittwoch, 11.6.2014, 14:45

Video:

Die Bedeutung fundamentaler Strafrechtsprinzipien im modernen EU-Strafrecht


Prof. Dr. Maria Kaiafa-Gbandi (Aristoteles Universität Thessaloniki)

Mittwoch, 21.5.2014

Video:

Das verschleierte Gesicht - Grund für strafrechtliche Verbote?


Prof. Dr. Tatjana Hörnle  (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

Mittwoch, 21.5.2014, 14 Uhr

Video:



 





Lecture Series Rechtswissenschaft in Frankfurt vor den Herausforderungen der nächsten 100 Jahre - Erfahrungen und Erwartungen

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Casino Raum 1.801

 

















Programme:

12 February 2014, 2-5pm

Prof. Dr. Thomas Duve  (Direktor MPI für europäische Rechtsgeschichte Frankfurt, Partner Investigator Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders")

Rechtsgeschichte - Traditionen und Perspektiven

Prof. Dr.  Hasso Hofmann (Humboldt-University zu Berlin)

Über Volkssouveränität


30 April 2014, 2-5pm

Prof. Dr. Katharina Pistor  (Columbia Law School)

Law and Finance - Neue Ansätze

Prof. Dr.  Gunther Teubner (Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main)

Wirtschaftsverfassung oder Wirtschaftsdemokratie? Franz Böhm und Hugo Sinzheimer jenseits des Nationalstaates



21 May 2014, 2-5pm

Prof. Dr. Tatjana Hörnle  (Humboldt-University zu Berlin)

Das verschleierte Gesicht - Grund für strafrechtliche Verbote?

Prof. Dr. Maria Kaiafa-Gbandi (Aristoteles University Thessaloniki)

Die Bedetutung fundamentaler Strafrechtsprinzipien im modernen EU-Strafrecht



11 June 2014, 2-8pm


2-2.45pm
Words of Welcome

2.45pm
Prof. Dr. Michael Bothe 
(Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main)

Public International Law in Frankfurt

3.15pm
Prof. Dr. Martti Koskenniemi (University of Helsinki)

The Future of Public International Law

4.30 Coffee break

5pm
Prof. Dr. Ingolf Pernice (Humboldt-University zu Berlin)

Das Internet im globalen Konstitutionalismus

5.30pm
Prof. Dr. Joseph H. H. Weiler (New York University)

The Future of European (Union) Law

6.45pm
Closing phrase

7pm
Reception

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders" in cooperation with the Faculty of Law of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main


Poster (pdf): click here...





 

 

List of Lecture Series: click here...

Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System

Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence



The normative order of the international system is often described as anarchical, denoting a system in which an overarching authority is missing that could dissolve conflicts between the main actors in this system, traditionally perceived to be nation-states. While the latter assumption has been relaxed during the last decades with the rise of non-state actors on the one hand and inter- and supranational organizations on the other, debates still cling to the notion of anarchy. Even if developments such as supranational decision-making in international organizations, informal decisionmaking in clubs or private transnational bodies undermine the classical understanding of anarchy, they are often portrayed as a (retractable) delegation of authority by states, but not as an element of rule in the international system. By contrast, international legal scholars think of the international system as an order governed by legal rules which, since the 19th century, is characterized by an increasing degree of “centralization” (Hans Kelsen) within the United Nations, a move from a management of coexistence to a spirit of co-operation, a proliferation of international organizations and growing influence of constitutional norms. Accordingly, the paradigm is not power, but law.
The lecture series covers the tension between these two perspectives and raises an issue that concerns both: What does authority and rule mean internationally? While some hold the position that authority is dependent on legitimacy, others would suggest that legitimacy is rather an  accompanying feature of authority or even prefer the term rule, pointing to the existence of opposition and dissidence in the international system.
In order to arrive at a thorough understanding of the changing normative order of international politics, distinguished speakers from different disciplinary (political science, law, sociology) and theoretical backgrounds are invited to discuss.

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Campus Westend
Hörsaalzentrum

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Programme (pdf): click here...

Wednesday, 16 October 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. Robert O. Keohane (Princeton University)
New Modes of Pluralist Global Governance
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 23 October 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. Nikita Dhawan (Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders")
The Politics of the Governed: Alter-Globalization and Subalternity
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 30. Oktober 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. Nico Krisch, Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA)/Barcelona Institute of International Studies (IBEI)
Liquid Authority: Law, Institutions and Legitimacy in Global Governance
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 20 November 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. Michael Zürn, WZB Berlin Social Science Center
Authority in a Postnational Order
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 4 December 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. Ian Hurd, Northwestern University
Politics of the International Rule of Law
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 11 December 2013, 6.15pm
Prof. David A. Lake, University of California, San Diego
Public and Private Authority in Global Governance
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 15 January 2014, 6.15pm
Prof. Armin von Bogdandy, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"/Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law
The Advent of International Public Authority
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 22 January 2014, 6.15pm
Prof. Clifford Bob, Duquesne University
Contention, Resistance, and International Institutions
For further information: click here...

Mittwoch, 29. Januar 2014, 18.15 Uhr
Prof. Harald Müller, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"/Peace Research Institute Frankfurt
Anarchy, Hierarchy, Polyarchy, Monarchy or else? What sort of global rule for a time of power change?
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 5. Februar 2014, 6.15pm
Prof. Nicholas Onuf, Florida International University
Rule and Rules in International Relations
For further information: click here...

Wednesday, 12. Februar 2014, 6.15pm
Prof. Christopher Daase/Prof. Nicole Deitelhoff, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"/Peace Research Institute Frankfurt
A Gordian Knot? Rule and Resistance in International Relations
For further information: click here...


Past Lecture Series: click here...

A Gordian Knot? Rule and Resistance in International Relations

Leccture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Christopher Daase, Prof. Nicole Deitelhoff, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"/Peace Research Institute Frankfurt

12 February 2014, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 9

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
Global politics is best conceived, we propose, not strictly as anarchy or hierarchy, but as a heterarchy where institutionalized power, or rule, assumes an array of guises, serves diverse functions and can be more or less concentrated or diffuse. We define rule as a structure of institutionalized superand subordination that reduces contingency and stabilizes expectations. The initial intuition is that ontologically rule predicates resistance, such that power and hegemony are only thinkable and visible when they are contested. Thus, we propose a research programme that observes and theorizes rule by way of observing and theorizing resistance. To do so coherently in a broad range of contexts, we introduce a distinction between opposition and dissidence. Given the definition of rule as a structure of institutionalized super- and subordination, dissidence is the stronger form of dissent characterized by a rejection of the structure in toto. Opposition, by contrast, is resistance to particular manifestations of rule, such as policies or specific norms, while accepting the overall structure. This distinction is analytically valuable because it allows substantively normative features of rule, like authority and domination, to be brought back into the analysis but with an empirically informed, rather than a priori, foundation.

CV
Christopher Daase is Chair for International Organization at Goethe University Frankfurt and Research Director at the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF). Previously he held the Chair in International Relations at the University of Munich (2004-2009) and was Senior Lecturer at the University of Kent at Canterbury as well as Director of the Programme on International Conflict Analysis at the Brussels School of International Studies (1999-2004). Educated at Universities in Hamburg, Freiburg and Berlin, he became SSRC-MacArthur Fellow in International Peace and Security for 1990 –1992 and was Research Fellow at Harvard University and the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA. He received his PhD in 1996 from the Free University of Berlin for an award winning dissertation on unconventional warfare. His research centres on theories of international relations, security issues and international institutions. As member of the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders” at the University of Frankfurt he currently works on changing patterns of legitimacy with regard to the use of force on the one hand, and on trends of informalization in international politics on the other hand.





Nicole Deitelhoff is Professor for International Relations in the Cluster of Excellence „Formation of Normative Orders“ at Goethe University and heads a research group on “Contested Normativity: Norm Conflicts in Global Governance“ at Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF). She obtained an MA in Political Science from State University of New York (UB Buffalo) and a PhD from University of Technology Darmstadt. She was visiting professor to Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 2010 and visiting fellow to the Center for European Studies at Harvard University in 2011. Her current research focuses on international institutions and norms, the foundations of political rule and its legitimation beyond the national state, and forms of resistance. Among her most well-known publications are Überzeugung in der Politik (Persuasion in Politics), Suhrkamp 2006, The Discursive Process of  Legalization. Charting Islands of Persuasion in the ICC case in International Organization 2009, and Leere Versprechungen? Deliberation und Opposition im Kontext transnationaler Legitimitätspolitik (Empty Promises? Deliberation and Opposition in Transnational Legitimation Politics) in Leviathan (2012).


Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

Rule and Rules in International Relations

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Nicholas Onuf, Florida International University

5 February 2014, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
Twenty-five years ago, when I published a book with the subtitle, Rules and Rule in International Relations, scholars in the field had little enough interest in rules (and norms—rules by another name). They had even less to say about rule - the condition of rule in any political society, including international society - because of the inside/outside binary (as R B J Walker would soon call it) and the assumption that anarchy prevails ´outside.´ In my book, I claimed that three kinds of rules eventuate in three forms (ideal types) of rule. I called them hierarchy, hegemony and heteronomy, and I found them everywhere in international relations. While hierarchy and hegemony were then well known and subsequently much discussed as recurrent phenomena in an unruly world, heteronomy was not - at least not as I conceptualized it. Since then, it has been ignored or confused with anarchy as a general condition. More generally, few scholars in the field are comfortable with the language of rule, however much they now talk about rules. On review, these developments in the world of scholarship do nothing to challenge my claim that international relations constitute a condition of rule. Conversely, globalization has significantly altered ruling practices from top to bottom, inside and out. Rules proliferate. Where there are rules, there is rule. Insofar as International Relations theory is social theory, we could hardly think otherwise.

CV
Nicholas Onuf is Professor Emeritus, Florida International University, Miami, and Professor Associado, Instituto de Relações Internationals, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. He holds an honorary Ph.D. from Panteion University, Athens. His latest book, Making Sense, Making Worlds: Constructivism in Social Theory and International Relations (2013) was published in conjunction with the republication of World of Our Making: Rules and Rule in Social Theory and International Relations (1989).


Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

Anarchy, Hierarchy, Polyarchy, Monarchy or else? What sort of global rule for a time of power change?

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Harald Müller, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"/Peace Research Institute Frankfurt

29 January 2014, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 9

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
The world, it is said, is undergoing seminal structural change. Unipolarity is giving way to multipolarity, Asia is rising, China is overtaking the USA as number one, the BRIC group is overtaking the West as the hegemonic group, and all this means a fundamental shift in the distribution of global power and, consequently, in the system of rule in the world. All this has to be taken with a grain of salt, of cause. A quick look at the two periods of apparently unchallenged US dominance, from 1945 to about 1966 (when the Soviet Union reached nuclearparity), and from 1990 to about 2005 (when the Bush adventures weakened the US at home and abroad), shows an astonishing discrepancy between the highly asymmetrical distribution of power resources and the degree to which the hegemon was able to impose its will on the world. This poses the fundamental question about the relationship of material power and its translation into substantial influence. The sobering answer to this question should calm down the nerves of those who panic about future Chinese dominance. There is, however, a residual reason for disquiet: When the difference between the ambition of the most powerful state and its real world achievement feeds frustration as for Napoleon, Wilhelm II, Adolf Hitler or Tojo, the consequences for the world can be rather horrible. It is advisable to remember this lesson in the 100 year anniversary of the beginning of World War I.

CV
Harald Müller is Executive Director of Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF) and Professor of International Relations at Goethe University Frankfurt. He also teaches regularly at Johns Hopkins University Center for International Relations, Bologna, Italy as a visiting professor. His research focuses on arms control, disarmament, non-proliferation, and security policy. His most recent book is Norm Dynamics in Multilateral Arms Control. Interests, Conflicts, and Justice (ed. with Carmen Wunderlich). Prof. Müller has served on German delegations to NPT Conferences since 1995. From 1999 to 2005 he was member of the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters of the UN Secretary General, chairing the Board in 2005. 2004/5 he was also appointed member of the Expert Group on Multilateral Fuel Arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency. From 1999 on, he has been co-chairing the Working Group on Peace and Conflict at the German Foreign Office’s Planning Staff; since 2010, he is Vice-President of the EU Consortium for Non-proliferation and Disarmament.

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

Contention, Resistance, and International Institutions

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Clifford Bob, Duquesne University

22 January 2014, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 10

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
Recent decades have seen a proliferation of international institutions. Realists dismiss these as existing merely at sufferance of states and as having little independent effect—a normative order of power. By contrast, liberals highlight the growth of centralized authority and cooperation a normative order of law. Using empirical examples, my paper argues that international institutions today offer new forums and objects of contention, not only for states but also and just as importantly for national interest groups. Even domestic actors that have traditionally eschewed international organizations/laws because of their alleged threat to sovereignty or tradition increasingly use them to advance their goals or to stymie their foes. On one hand, this shows the growing influence of international institutions. But it does not necessarily indicate that we are entering a period in which law rules. Instead, international law and organizations are one more arena of conflict, one more means to an end. Even when law is contentiously “made,” it is seldom stable, with opponents seeking the law’s reversal, evisceration, or perversion. Even those who use international institutions scorn their authority and legitimacy, if the institutions do not serve crucial interests. The ideal of law as a settled and revered moral ideal—seldom in fact the case within states—is even less so internationally.

CV
Clifford Bob is Professor of Political Science and holds the Raymond J. Kelley Endowed Chair in International Relations at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. He studies human rights,  globalization, and transnational networks. His book, The Global Right Wing and the Clash of World Politics, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. His 2005 book, The Marketing of Rebellion: Insurgents, Media, and International Activism (Cambridge), won the International Studies Association Best Book Award. He has written for political science, law, and policy journals. Among his current projects is “Rights as Weapons in Political Conflict,” on the use of rights claims to camouflage ulterior motives, break opposing coalitions, and attack despised institutions. These include deployment of women’s rights against Muslim  communities in France, of animal rights in Catalonia’s bullfighting ban, and of parental rights by Italian secularists seeking to eject crucifixes from classrooms. In a prior incarnation, Dr. Bob worked as a litigator, including pro bono refugee and human rights work for the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, and as a law teacher at the National University of Singapore. Dr. Bob holds a Ph.D. from MIT, a J.D. from NYU, and a B.A. magna cum laude in social studies from Harvard.

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

The Advent of International Public Authority

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Armin von Bogdandy,
Cluster of Excellence Normative Orders/Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law

15 January 2014, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 6

Abstract
The talk proposes a distinctly public law approach to the deep transformation in the conduct of public affairs epitomized by the term global governance. We find in many policy fields an increasing number of international institutions playing an active and often crucial role in decision-making and policy implementation, sometimes even affecting individuals. Thus, a private real estate sale in Berlin is blocked by a decision of the UN Security Council Al-Qaida and Taliban Sanctions Committee; the construction of a bridge in Dresden is legally challenged because the affected part of the Elbe river valley had been included on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage; or educational policies most relevant to our children are profoundly reformed due to the OECD Pisa rankings. These examples illustrate that governance activities of international institutions may have a strong legal or factual impact on domestic issues. This calls upon scholars of public law to lay open the legal setting of such governance activities, to find out how, and by whom, they are controlled, and to develop legal standards for ensuring that they satisfy contemporary expectations for legitimacy.

CV
Armin von Bogdandy is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg and Professor of Public Law at the Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt/Main. He is President of the OECD Nuclear Energy Tribunal. He was member of the German Science Council (Wissenschaftsrat). In June 2008 Prof. Bogdandy received the Berlin-Brandenburgian Academy of Sciences Prize for outstanding scientific achievements in the field of foundations of law and economics, sponsored by the Commerzbank Foundation. He is Member of the Scientific Committee of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (2008-2013) and was invited to be the Inaugural Fellow at the Straus Institute for Advanced Study of Law and Justice, New York University, Academic Year 2009/2010. He has been Global Law Professor at New York University School of Law in 2005 and 2009 and was appointed as a Senior Emile Noel Fellow from Global Law School Personnel Committee of the New York University (2010-2015).

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

Public and Private Authority in Global Governance

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. David A. Lake,
University of California, San Diego

11 December 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 8

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
The division of politics into domestic systems of hierarchy and effective political order and an international system of anarchy and weak political order is wrong, descriptively and analytically. Authority is not given or fixed, but is itself the product of politics. Public authorities embodied in states, nonstate authorities of many forms, and individuals alone and in groups struggle over their legitimate powers and areas of autonomy. Conceived as a political phenomenon, a proper understanding of authority dissolves the domestic-international divide from the inside out. Conversely, authority exists in myriad forms at all levels of politics, including by states over other states, by supranational entities, and by “private” actors. Equating all authority with the public or lawful authority of states, theorists have incorrectly assumed that the international system is anarchic or devoid of authority higher than states themselves. As globalization expands, the power and role of the various global authorities may also increase, if only to maintain existing levels of governance in a world of shared problems or, perhaps, to provide even greater order. The ultimate trajectory and outcome of this dynamic process is now unknown. But we can predict with certainty that, as political projects, global authorities will be increasingly objects of struggle and contestation. Revealing these global authorities, often of long-standing, further dissolves the domestic-international divide, this time from the outside in.

CV
David A. Lake is the Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Associate Dean of Social Sciences, and Director of Yankelovich Center for Social Science Research at the University of California, San Diego. He has written widely in the field of international relations. Lake is the former chair of the International Political Economy Society and past President of the International Studies Association. The recipient of UCSD Chancellor’s Associates Awards for Excellence in Graduate Education and Excellence in Research, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2006.

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:



Politics of the International Rule of Law

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Ian Hurd,
Northwestern University

4 December 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 9

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
he international rule of law is often seen a centerpiece of the modern international order. It is routinely reaffirmed by governments, international organizations, scholars, and activists. On drones and targeted killing, on the use of force, military intervention and non-intervention, and on territorial questions and border disputes, governments frequently suggest that a rule-of-law system among states is the progressive, humane, and modern alternative to power politics, brute force, and coercion. The rule of law often appears as a charmed concept, essentially without critics or doubters, and outside of the realm of politics. In contrast to this view, I consider the political context and content of the international rule of law. Rather than a universal concept that embodies shared interests and goals of states, the international rule of law is a political resource that states use to legitimize and delegitimize contending policies. International law is within international politics. Appeal by govern ments to the international rule of law as a solution to a political dispute must be seen as power politics in a legal form. This involves more than just asking questions about who writes the rules and for what interests. It also means examining how international law is used in international politics. I examine what the rule of law means for world politics, what it does, and what it replaces.

CV
Ian Hurd is Associate Professor of political science at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. His research is on the politics of international law. It examines how governments use international law to construct and defend their policy positions, and the power of law in shaping those decisions. He is currently writing a book about the international rule of law which focuses on legal and politics questions around the war, drones, torture, and more. He has written widely in the past on international organizations, international law, and international relations, including in the books International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice (2nd ed. 2013) and After Anarchy: Legitimacy and Power in the UN Security Council (2007) which won the Myres McDougal prize (Policy Sciences Society) and the Chadwick Alger prize (International Studies Association). His articles and essays have appeared in International Organization, International Politics, the Chinese Journal of International Politics, Foreign Affairs, Global Governance, Ethics and International Affairs, the Journal of International Organization Studies, and elsewhere.

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:


Authority in a Postnational Order

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Michael Zürn
, WZB Berlin Social Science Center

20 November 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
The Western notion of legitimate rule is strongly associated with democratic constitutionalism. What is needed is in this view a central place of final decisions and democratic procedures to control it. The political developments in the last three decades have undermined that significantly.
Democratic rule is increasingly replaced by numerous sites of authorities like central banks or international institutions that neither are able to make final decision nor can be described as democratic. Yet these authorities are often needed and trusted. This leads to a democratic paradox and to reflexive legitimacy the revival of contestation about the appropriate criteria for political legitimacy.

CV
Michael Zürn is Director of the Research Unit “Global Governance’ at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center and Professor for Political Science and International Relations at the Free University Berlin. He was founding Dean of the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin (2004 – 2009) and is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Science. He has published in journals like International Organization, World Politics, European Journal of International Relations and International Studies Quarterly. Among his most recent publications are Handbook on Multi-Level Governance, Edward Elgars Publishers, 2010 (edited together with Henrik Enderlein and Sonja Wälti); The Dynamics of the Rule of Law in an Era of International and Transnational Governance, Cambridge University Press, 2012 (edited together with Andre Nollkaemper and Randy Peerenboom); Can the Politicization of European Integration be Reversed? in: Journal of Common Market Studies, , 2012, 1:50, 137-153 (together with Pieter de Wilde); International authority and its politicization, in: International Theory, 2012, 4:1, 69–106 (together with Martin Binder, Matthias Ecker-Ehrhardt).

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery
:

Liquid Authority: Law, Institutions and Legitimacy in Global Governance

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Nico Krisch,
Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA) and Barcelona Institute

30 October 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 10

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
We are used to thinking about politics and law as based on firm institutions with authoritative decision-making power. Most of our key categories and democratic mechanisms revolve around such solid institutions. But solidity has been called into question through the rise of ‘governance’ – and even more so, the rise of global governance. Authority in the global context has increasingly been liquefied: it no longer has a clear locus, it is spread across multiple sites, its forms are malleable, and the actors behind it are often unclear. How can such authority be held to account? Does law continue to play a role in checking it? How can we assess the legitimacy of such governance structures? This talk will look at the rising challenge of liquid authority and different kinds of responses to it.

CV
Nico Krisch is a Research Professor at the Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA) and the Barcelona Institute of International Studies (IBEI). His expertise lies in the fields of international law, international institutions and global governance. Previously he has been a Professor of International Law at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, a Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, a Senior Lecturer at the Law Department of the London School of Economics, and has held postdoctoral fellowships at Merton College (Oxford) and New York University School of Law. He holds a Ph.D. in law from the University of Heidelberg and a Diploma of European Law of the Academy of European Law in Florence, Italy. He is the author of Selbstverteidigung und kollektive Sicherheit (Self-defense and Collective Security, 2001) and of articles on the United Nations, hegemony in international law, and the legal order of global governance. His most recent book, Beyond Constitutionalism: The Pluralist Structure of Postnational Law (2010), was awarded the 2012 Certificate of Merit of the American Society of International Law.

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:

The Politics of the Governed: Alter-Globalization and Subalternity

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Nikita Dhawan, Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

23 October 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 1

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
Unequal access to power and uneven distribution of resources in the current phase of postcolonial late capitalism has spurred a range of critical discourses and movements that seek to reconfigure global hierarchies. Free-market globalization has led to the systematic dismantling of accountability of the state, which is increasingly taking on a managerial role. Ironically, the loss of legitimacy of the state has opened up new opportunities of action for the international civil society, which is increasingly at the helm of global governance. Enjoying a high level of legitimacy in the public sphere, international organizations are increasingly entrusted with the task of globally monitoring issues of justice, peace and democracy. My talk interrogates the vanguardism of extra-state collective action and the state-phobic politics of the feudally benevolent alter-globalization lobby, who have become organic intellectuals of global capitalism. The focus will be on subaltern groups, who can neither access organs of the state nor transnational counterpublics. I will examine the limits and lures of cosmopolitan politics in a postcolonial world by exploring the discontinuity between those who “right wrongs” from above and those below who are wronged.

CV
Nikita Dhawan is Junior Professor of Political Science for Gender/Postcolonial Studies, Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”, Goethe University Frankfurt. She has held visiting fellowships at the Institute for International Law and the Humanities, The University of Melbourne, Australia; Program of Critical Theory, University of California, Berkeley, USA; University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain; Pusan National University, South Korea; Columbia University, New York, USA. Her publications include Impossible Speech: On the Politics of Silence and Violence (2007) and Decolonizing Enlightenment: Transnational Justice, Human Rights and Democracy in a Postcolonial World (ed., 2013).

Programme (pdf): click here...

Gallery:


New Modes of Pluralist Global Governance

Lecture Series "Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System"

Prof. Robert O. Keohane,
Princeton University

16 October 2013, 6.15pm
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Video:



Audio:



Abstract
This talk will describe a new mode of pluralist global governance, which my co-authors (Graine de Burca and Charles Sabel) and I describe as “Global Experimentalist Governance.” Experimentalist Governance describes a set of practices involving open participation by a variety of entities (public or private), lack of formal hierarchy within governance arrangements, and extensive deliberation throughout the process of decision making and implementation. It is characterized also by continuous feedback, reporting, and monitoring and by established practices, involving peer review, for revising rules and practices. Experimentalist Governance arises in situations of complex interdependence and pervasive uncertainty about causal relationship, and its practice is illustrated by the arrangements devised to protect dolphins from being killed by tuna fishing practices; the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; and the Montreal Protocol on the Ozone Layer. Without presenting a full theory of the conditions under which Global Experimentalist Governance arises, I put forward four tentative hypotheses about these conditions, for discussion. I propose that governments must be unable to formulate a comprehensive set of rules and efficiently and effectively monitor compliance with them; they must not be stymied by a lack of agreement on basic principles; civil society actors must be deeply involved in the politics of the issue; and the issue must not be a matter of high politics.

CV
Robert O. Keohane is Professor of International Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (1984) and Power and Governance in a Partially Globalized World (2002). He is co-author (with Joseph S. Nye, Jr.) of Power and Interdependence (third edition 2001), and (with Gary King and Sidney Verba) of Designing Social Inquiry (1994). He has served as the editor of the journal International Organization and as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association. He won the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, 1989, and the Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science, 2005. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and Science Po in Paris, and is the Harold Lasswell Fellow (2007-08) of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Programme (pdf): click here

Gallery:

Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence Summer Semester 2012

Normativity and Historicity: Frankfurt Perspektives II

"Normativity and Historicity" marks an area of conflict. Nearly every normative order claims to be well justified as well as valid at any time and any place. Every ethnologically or historically inspired contemplation on the world works from the premis that each 'culture'or 'epoch' develops its own normative order, which can change more quickly or slowly. The Lecture Series is a continuation of the series of readings about Frankfurt Perspectives on Normativtiy that was begun with a philosophical-political scientific view on normativity.

Brochure: click here...

Poster (pdf): click here...

Programme:

11 April 2012, 4pm.
Normwandel und Medien im subsaharischen Afrika
Prof. Mamadou Diawara, Dr. Ute Röschenthaler
For further information: click here...

18 April 2012, 4pm
Mathematik vs. König - Herausbildung einer normativen Ordnung der Lebenswelt der altägyptischen Experten
Prof. Annette Warner
For further information: click here...

2 May 2012, 4pm
Das christliche Kaisertum
Ein europäisches Paradox
Prof. Hartmut Leppin
For further information: click here...

16 May 2012, 4pm.
Wirtschaftstheorie, Normsetzung und Herrschaft
Freihandel, »Rule of Law« und das Recht des Kanonenboots
Prof. Andreas Fahrmeir, Dr. Verena Steller
For further information: click here...

23 May 2012, 4pm
Plädoyer für eine Ikonologie der Geschichtswissenschaft
Prof. Bernhard Jussen
For further information: click here...

30 May 2012, 6.15pm
Was ist Wandel »normativer Ordnungen« im Europa des 16./17. Jahrhunderts?
HZ 15
Prof. Luise Schorn-Schütte
For further information: click here...

6 June 2012, 4pm
Die Herausbildung moderner Geschlechterordnungen in der islamischen Welt
Prof. Susanne Schröter
For further information: click here...

13 June 2012, 4pm
Die Moral der Gleichheit Jean d‘Alembert zwischen moderater und radikaler Aufklärung
Prof. Moritz Epple
For further information: click here...

20 June 2012, 4pm
Kosmopolitische Dynamik im Völkerrecht?
Prof. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann
For further information: click here...

27 June 2012, 4pm
Teilen und Herrschen
Afrika und die französische Kolonialadministration des Ancien Régime
Dr. Benjamin Steiner
For further information: click here...

4 July 2012, 4pm
Die Indigenenbewegung in den ehemaligen britischen Siedlerkolonien
Prof. Karl-Heinz Kohl
For further information: click here...

11 July 2012, 4pm
Schutzherrschaft revisited
Kolonialismus aus afrikanischer Perspektive
Dr. Stefanie Michels
For further information: click here...

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The formation of Normative Orders"


Headlines

„Normative Ordnungen“, herausgegeben von Rainer Forst und Klaus Günther, erscheint am 17. April 2021 im Suhrkamp Verlag

Am 17. April 2021 erscheint der Sammelband „Normative Ordnungen“ im Suhrkamp Verlag. Herausgegeben von den Clustersprechern Prof. Rainer Forst und Prof. Klaus Günther, bietet das Werk einen weit gefassten interdispziplinären Überblick über die Ergebnisse eines erfolgreichen wissenschaftlichen Projekts. Mehr...

Das Postdoc-Programm des Forschungsverbunds „Normative Ordnungen“: Nachwuchsförderung zwischen 2017 und 2020

Die Förderung des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses ist seit je her ein integraler Bestandteil des Forschungsverbunds „Normative Ordnungen“. Das 2017 neu strukturierte, verbundseigene Postdoc-Programm bietet die besten Bedingungen zu forschen und hochqualifizierte junge Wissenschaftler*innen zu fördern. Zum Erfahrungsbericht: Hier...

„Symposium on Jürgen Habermas’ Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie“ herausgegeben von Rainer Forst erschienen

Als jüngste Ausgabe der Zeitschrift "Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory" ist kürzlich das „Symposium on Jürgen Habermas, Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie“ herausgegeben von Prof. Rainer Forst erschienen. Mehr...

Upcoming Events

23. September 2021, 18.30 Uhr

Kontrovers: Aus dem FGZ: Moralismus in analogen und digitalen Debatten: Eine Gefahr für die Demokratie? Mehr...

4. Oktober 2021, 19.30 Uhr

StreitClub des FGZ-Standort Frankfurt: „Grenzen der Meinungsfreiheit“. Mit Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff (FGZ, Goethe-Universität), Prof. Dr. Dr. Michel Friedman (Frankfurt UAS), Prof. Dr. Christian Schertz (Technische Universität Dresden) und Florian Schroeder (Kabarettist). Mehr...

-----------------------------------------

Latest Media

Videoarchiv

Weitere Videoaufzeichnungen finden Sie hier...

Identitätsspiel_Was bestimmt uns wirklich?

Dr. Mithu Sanyal (Autorin)
Moderation: Prof. Dr. Joachim Valentin, Direktor der katholischen Akademie Rabanus Maurus, Haus am Dom Frankfurt
DenkArt "Identität_Aber welche?

Armed non-state actors and the politics of recognition

Prof. Dr. Anna Geis (Helmut-Schmidt-Universität Hamburg), Prof. Dr. Hanna Pfeifer (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator im Clusterprojekt "ConTrust: Vertrauen im Konflikt"), Prof. Dr. Martin Saar (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Principal Investigator im Clusterprojekt "ConTrust: Vertrauen im Konflikt" und "Normative Orders") und Prof. Dr. Reinhard Wolf (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main).
Moderation: Regina Schidel (Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" der Goethe-Universität)
Book lɔ:ntʃ

New full-text Publications

Rainer Forst (2021):

Solidarity: concept, conceptions, and contexts. Normative Orders Working Paper 02/2021. More...

Annette Imhausen (2021):

Sciences and normative orders: perspectives from the earliest sciences. Normative Orders Working Paper 01/2021. More...