Ringvorlesungen

Cluster Lecture Series 2009-10

Law without the State?
On the Normativity of Lawmaking beyond the State

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3

Subject of the lecture series:

The goal of the Lecture Series is to inform students, colleagues and other interested parties concerning the current state of research and to invite them to participate in the discussion.

Our inaugural Lecture Series is entitled "Recht ohne Staat? Zur Normativität nichtstaatlicher Rechtsetzung".

Read more...

 

 

Programme

Wednesday, 21 October 2009, 6.15pm
Professor Dr. Klaus Dieter Wolf, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt
Unternehmen als Normunternehmer

Die Einbindung privater Akteure in grenzüberschreitende politische Steuerungsprozesse

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 18 November 2009, 6.15pm
Professor Dr. Franz von Benda-Beckmann, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology (Halle)
Recht ohne Staat im Staat
Eine rechtsethnologische Betrachtung

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 16 December 2009, 6.15om.
Professor Dr. Dr. Rainer Hofmann, Goethe University Frankfurt/Main
Modernes Investitionsschutzrecht
Ein Beispiel für entstaatlichte Setzung und Durchsetzung von Recht?

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 20 January 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Gunther Teubner, Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, London School of Economics
Verfassungen ohne Staat?
Zur Konstitutionalisierung transnationaler Regimes

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 3 February 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Dr. Thomas Duve, Max Planck Institute for European Legal History (Frankfurt)
Recht ohne Staat
Ein Blick auf die Rechtsgeschichte

For further information: click here

To download the complete programme click here (pdf, German)

Cluster Lecture Series Summer Semester 2010

Non-Western Approaches to Justice and Peace

Goethe University Frankfurt/Main / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3

Plakat Ringvorlesung 2010The goal of the Lecture Series is to inform students, colleagues and other interested parties concerning the current state of research and to invite them to participate in the discussion.

Our second lecture series is entitled "Non-Western Approaches to Justice and Peace".

Read more...

 

Programme

Wednesday, 5 May 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Nikita Dhawan (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
Gendering Justice in a Postcolonial World
For further information: click here

Wednesday, 12 May 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Ramesh Thakur (Centre for International Governance Innovation, University of Waterloo)
International Criminal Justice
At the Intersection of Power, Norms and a Shifting Global Order

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 19 May 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Mohammed Ayoob (Michigan State University)
Subaltern Approach(es) to Order and Justice
A Preliminary Exploration

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 2 June 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Siba N’Zatioula Grovogui (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore)
Can You Hear Me Now?
‘The Last Normative Order’ and Why it Collapsed

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 16 June 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Emad Shahin (Kroc Institute for Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame)
Jihad, Combat, and Peace in Islam

For further information: click here

Wednesday, 30 June 2010, 6.15pm
Professor Yasuaki Onuma (University of Tokyo)
An “Intercivilizational” Approach to Peace and Justice
For further information: click here

To download the complete programme here (pdf)

Wednesday, 21 October 2009

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Dr. Klaus Dieter Wolf, Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung

Unternehmen als Normunternehmer

Die Einbindung privater Akteure in grenzüberschreitende politische Steuerungsprozesse

Biographical sketch
Klaus Dieter WolfKlaus Dieter Wolf has been Professor of Political Science with a concentration on international relations at the Institute for Political Science at the TU Darmstadt since 1992 and is one of the Principal Investigators of the Cluster of Excellence ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’. Questions of the effectiveness and legitimacy of cross-border governance, particularly as regards the role of private actors, form the main focus of his research. Professor Wolf has been Head of Research Department at the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt since 2005 and has served as its Deputy Director since 2007. Recent publications: Die UNO: Geschichte, Aufgaben, Perspektiven (2005); Die neuen Internationalen Beziehungen: Forschungsstand und Perspektiven in Deutschland (co-edited with Gunther Hellmann and Michael Zürn) (2003).

Abstract
There is widespread agreement that the concept of law is not definitionally tied to the political organisation of a state. At least as law and legal pluralism are understood in legal anthropology, law can be made and applied by non-state actors, even if it is not recognised as ‘established law’ within national and international legal systems. However, it does not follow that the state and state law do not exert a profound influence on the emergence and operation of such a law. Therefore, this lecture will attempt to show that statements concerning ‘Law without the State’ call for a differentiated approach in complex contemporary legal systems, and it will suggest what such an approach might look like from an anthropological point of view.

Wednesday, 18 November 2009, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Dr. Franz von Benda-Beckmann, Max-Planck-Institut für ethnolo-gische Forschung (Halle)

Recht ohne Staat im Staat
Eine rechtsethnologische Betrachtung

Biographical sketch
Franz von Benda-BeckmannFranz von Benda-Beckmann is Professor (since 2006 Emeritus Professor) and since July 2000 Director (jointly with Keebet von Benda-Beckmann) of the task force ‘Legal Pluralism’ at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle. He holds honorary professorships in social anthropology at the University of Leipzig (2002) and in legal pluralism at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (2004). In addition to empirical research, he is primarily interested in theoretical and methodological questions of legal anthropology. Recent publications: The Power of Law in a Transnational World: Anthropological Enquiries (co-edited with Keebet von Benda-Beckmann and Anne Griffiths) (2009); Rules of Law and Laws of Ruling: On the Governance of Law (co-edited with Keebet von Benda-Beckmann and Julia Eckert) (2009); Gesellschaftliche Wirkung von Recht: Rechtsethnologische Perspektiven (co-edited with Keebet von Benda-Beckmann) (2007).

Abstract

There is widespread agreement that the concept of law is not definitionally tied to the political organisation of a state. At least as law and legal pluralism are understood in legal anthropology, law can be made and applied by non-state actors, even if it is not recognised as ‘established law’ within national and international legal systems. However, it does not follow that the state and state law do not exert a profound influence on the emergence and operation of such a law. Therefore, this lecture will attempt to show that statements concerning ‘Law without the State’ call for a differentiated approach in complex contemporary legal systems, and it will suggest what such an approach might look like from an anthropological point of view.

Wednesday, 16 December 2009, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Dr. Dr. Rainer Hofmann, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität

Modernes Investitionsschutzrecht.

Ein Beispiel für entstaatlichte Setzung und Durchsetzung von Recht?

Biographical sketch
Rainer HofmannFollowing professorships in Cologne (1994-1997) and Kiel (1997-2005), Rainer Hofmann has been Professor of Public Law, International Law and European Law in Frankfurt since 2005. The chief focus of his research is human rights, including refugee and minority rights, international business law, and issues concerning European integration. He is an active member of numerous national and international committees and associations. Recent publications: The European Union and WTO Doha Round (with G. Tondl) (2007); The International Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes (with C. Tams) (2007); Europäisches Flüchtlings- und Einwanderungsrecht: Eine kritische Zwischenbilanz (with T. Löhr) (2008).

Abstract
Investment protection law traditionally rested on customary norms of the law governing foreign nationals and on bilateral treaties which, in cases of disputes, provided for international dispute settlement procedures based on the right to grant diplomatic protection. The situation is fundamentally different in modern investment protection law. It rests on ca. 2,600 Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs), which, in cases of disputes, grant private investors the right, on the basis of the investment contract itself, to initiate proceedings against the guest state before international arbitration tribunals. At present, around 300 such proceedings are pending. Modern BITs grant private investors material and procedural rights, thus making them into partial subjects of international law and contributing to a transformation of international law. International investment disputes are adjudicated by arbitration tribunals composed of judges appointed privately by the parties to the proceedings, hence also by private investors. This means that such disputes are no longer adjudicated by purely international dispute regulation mechanisms or by national courts, but by international arbitration tribunals with a decisive private involvement. Thus we must ask whether the process described can in fact be regarded as indicating a partial denationalisation of international law or a transformation of the primarily state-oriented character of international law.

Wednesday, 20 January 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Gunther Teubner, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität und London School of Economics

Verfassungen ohne Staat?

Zur Konstitutionalisierung transnationaler Regimes

Biographical sketch
Gunther TeubnerGunther Teubner is Professor of Private Law and Sociology of Law and is Principal Investigator of the Cluster of Excellence ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’ at the Goethe University Frankfurt and is Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics. He has held guest professorships in Berkeley, Stanford, Ann Arbor, Toronto, Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin, and The Hague. He has received honorary doctorates from the universities of Lucerne, Naples, Tiflis, and Macerata. The principal focus of his research is on the theoretical sociology of law, the theory of private law, and contractual law. Recent publications: Nach Jacques Derrida und Niklas Luhmann: Zur (Un-)Möglichkeit einer Gesellschaftstheorie der Gerechtigkeit (2008); Regime-Kollisionen: Zur Fragmentierung des Weltrechts (2006); Transnational Governance and Constitutionalism (2004).

Abstract
In recent years a series of political scandals has revealed the problems posed by a constitutionalism beyond the nation-state. Violations of human rights by multinational corporations; controversial decisions by the WTO which jeopardise environmental protection or public health in the name of global free trade; threats to freedom of opinion by private intermediaries in the Internet; and, recently, the overwhelming impact of the unleashing of catastrophic risks on the worldwide capital markets – all of these phenomena pose not only problems of political and legal regulation but also constitutional problems in the strict sense. Transnational constitutionalism signifies two things: the constitutional question arises beyond the boundaries of the nation-state within transnational political processes and, at the same time, beyond the institutionalised political sector within the ‘private’ sectors of the global economy.

Wednesday, 3 February 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Dr. Thomas Duve, Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte

Recht ohne Staat

Ein Blick auf die Rechtsgeschichte

Biographical sketch
Thomas DuveThomas Duve is the Director of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History. Following his habilitation in the fields of civil law, German legal history, historical comparative law, canon law, and legal philosophy, he was Professor of the History of Law with dedicación especial en investigación in the Faculty of Law and Professor of the History of Canon Law in the Faculty of Canon Law at the Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina (UCA) from 2005 to 2009; since August 2009 he is Adjunct Professor of the History of Canon Law in the Faculty of Canon Law at the UCA. Recent publications: Sonderrecht in der Frühen Neuzeit: Das frühneuzeitliche ius singulare, untersucht anhand der privilegia miserabilium personarum, senum und indorum in Alter und Neuer Welt (2008).

Abstract
Whereas the history of law is measured in millennia, the ‘modern state’ is a comparatively recent phenomenon. Clearly, what was understood by ‘law’ and ‘state’ were not always seen as necessarily connected with one another. The lecture will present historical experiences illustrating how ‘law’ can also exist apart from or alongside the ‘state’.

Lecture Series: Law without the State?

Is the development of law escaping the influence of the state in the era of globalisation? Are global systems, such as the international economy, producing their own legal structures? How far does the reach of democratic legislation still extend today? What conditions must be fulfilled if non-state law is even to be recognised as ‘law’ by state authorities and to be implemented as such? How much influence does the state exert in turn on the emergence of non-state law? And how are possible jurisdictional conflicts between the two systems to be resolved? These questions provide the chief focus of the inaugural Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence ‘The Formation of Normative Orders’. The series of five presentations will be held over the course of the Winter Semester 2009-10 in the Hörsaalzentrum on the Westend Campus. Under the title ‘Law without the State? On the Normativity of Lawmaking beyond the State’, the series will address a topic whose importance reaches far beyond the legal sciences. Responsibility for organising this inaugural Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence lies with Research Area 4 of the Cluster, ‘The Formation of Legal Norms between Nations’.

The concept of law may initially appear to be closely bound up with the form of political organisation of the state. From a historical point of view, however, the phenomenon of ‘Law without the State’ is the rule rather than the exception. Whereas the history of law is measured in millennia, the ‘modern state’ is a comparatively recent phenomenon. Yet it would be shortsighted to regard the beginning of the nation-state as marking the end of the institution of lawmaking outside the ambit of the state. Lawmaking within the state, primarily through democratically legitimated legislation, neither can nor should ever extend so far that it prevents lawmaking by non-state actors. Today, in particular, we can observe, across a whole range of spheres of life, processes of making and applying law involving actors whose regulatory needs are not met by state institutions.

In the cross-border domain, the concept of ‘transnational law’ has been adopted to describe these processes. But within the domestic domain, too, non-state lawmaking is initiated by actors from different sectors of society, ranging from business enterprises, through sports associations, to consumer protection organisations and religious communities. This phenomenon raises the question of the interaction between state power and non-state law-making.

The lecture ‘Law without the State: A Survey of the Legal History’ will address this question from a historical perspective. The lecture will be presented by Prof. Thomas Duve of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt. From the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle comes Prof. Franz von Benda-Beckmann. In his lecture entitled ‘Law without the State in the State’, he will address non-state legal pluralism from an anthropological perspective. As regards the transnational domain of a law without the state, Prof. Klaus Dieter Wolf (Peace Research Institute Frankfurt) will examine the issue of the integration of private actors into transnational political steering processes (‘Corporations As Norm Entrepreneurs’). Prof. Gunther Teubner (Goethe University Frankfurt and London School of Economics) will throw light on the idea of transnational constitutionalism in his lecture on ‘Constitutions without the State? On the Constitutionalisation of Transnational Regimes’. Prof. Rainer Hofmann (Goethe University Frankfurt) will examine a modern example of law beyond the state in his presentation on ‘Modern Investment Protection Law – An Example of the Setting and Implementation of Law outside the State?’

We look forward to interesting lectures and stimulating debates!

List of Lecture Series

Each of the Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence focuses on central aspects of the work of the research network from the perspective of one of the participating disciplines. Their primary goal is to enable students, colleagues and other interested parties to share in the current state of research and to engage them in discussion.


Lecture Series 2018/2019

The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century
For further infomation: Click here...

 

Past events:

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2017
Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2016
Modelling Transformation

Lecture Series, Winter Semester 2015/2016
Norm Conflicts in Pluralistic Societies

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2015
Theorizing Global Order

Lecture Series, Winter Semester 2014/2015
Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers

Lecture Series, first half 2014
Rechtswissenschaft in Frankfurt vor den Herausforderungen der nächsten 100 Jahre - Erfahrungen und Erwartungen

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2013/14
Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2012
Normativität und Geschichtlichkeit: Frankfurter Perspektiven II

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2011/12
Normativität: Frankfurter Perspektiven

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2011
Postsäkularismus

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2010/11
The Nature of Normativity

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2010
"Non-Western Approaches to Justice and Peace"

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2009/10
Recht ohne Staat? Zur Normativität nichtstaatlicher Rechtsetzung

How are Justice and Peace Understood around the World?

You are kindly invited to participate in the lecture series on “Non-Western Approaches to Justice and Peace” organized by the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”. We are looking forward to insightful contributions by leading experts from a variety of academic disciplines on how central normative concepts are understood around the world. We are especially interested in how the interpretation of “justice” and “peace” in non-dominant and non-privileged parts of the globe affects the evolution of a global normative order.

The political discourse on the normative evolution of international society still suffers from Eurocentrism. Concepts like “the state”, “sovereignty”, and “intervention” are rooted in the unique history of European state building and are not easily transferrable to other regions of the world. Ideas and values like “freedom”, “individuality”, and “human rights” have their origin in the Enlightenment and are not accepted as universal throughout the world. This is why Western ideas about promoting international law, creating a liberal economic world order, or establishing a global “responsibility to protect” are often met with reservation and are sometimes viewed as expressions of neo-colonialism.

Non-Western approaches, on the other hand, are often disregarded, accepted only with reservations as theoretically backward, or discredited as reflections of power or ideology. Even speaking in terms of “non-Western” approaches tacitly accepts the “Western” approach as the standard against which alternative accounts should be measured. But if globalization is to be something more than a hegemonic Western project and the transformation of the normative basis of the international system is to win global acceptance, an inter-cultural discourse about normative concepts and ideas is needed. For different historical experiences, cultural developments, and socio-economic conditions have led to diverse notions of justice and peace which need to be brought into harmony with one another.

The aim of this lecture series is to initiate a trans-cultural and inter-civilizational dialogue concerning justice and peace by providing an opportunity to listen and learn about alternative perspectives. We have invited six internationally renowned scholars to address different aspects of the emerging international normative order. Professor Ramesh Thakur, former Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations, will commence proceedings with a talk on “International Criminal Justice” and the ways in which universal jurisdiction can be embedded in a broader system of democratic policy-making in order to make it acceptable to all of the communities involved. Nikita Dhawan, Professor at Frankfurt University and Director of its Center for Postcolonial Studies, will follow with a lecture on “Gendering Justice in a Postcolonial World”. Dhawan points to the Eurocentric and androcentric bias of traditional concepts of justice arguing that the “Western” intellectual tradition is at once inadequate and indispensible.

Professor Mohamed Ayoob from the University of Michigan will broaden this perspective. In his talk he will outline a “Subaltern Vision of Order and Justice” and call for more inclusionary modes of international policy-making. Siba N’Zatioula Grovogui, Professor at Johns Hopkins University, will provide a thorough theoretical basis for this vision. Drawing on the writings of four African intellectuals and their ideas concerning a just post-colonial system, he establishes the foundation for an alternative account of a universal normative order. Emad Shahin, Professor of Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding at the University of Notre Dame, starts from a similar angle. By examining the ideas of major contemporary Islamic thinkers, he sheds new light on the concepts of peace, war, and, especially, Jihad in Islam. Jihad, he argues, is a seriously misunderstood concept and should also be interpreted in connection with the ethics of peace in Islam. Yasuaki Onuma, Professor of International Law at the University of Tokyo, will round off the lecture series by presenting an “Intercivilizational Approach to Justice and Peace”. Onuma argues that standards for assessing good governance and human rights often lack objectivity and are insensitive and inappropriate to non-Western realities. He therefore argues for the development of an “intercivilizational” approach to human rights and other normative principles.

A common theme of all presentations will be the similarities and differences between Western and Non-Western concepts and ideas and how divergent notions of justice and peace can be reconciled in order to enhance the well-being of all humankind.

We look forward to interesting lectures and exciting debates!

Professor Christopher Daase

 

<  Back to overview

Wednesday, 12 May 2010, 6.15pm

 

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Ramesh Thakur (Centre for International Governance Innovation, University of Waterloo)

International Criminal Justice
At the Intersection of Power, Norms and a Shifting Global Order

CV

Thakur RameshIn May 2007 Ramesh Thakur took up a new position as Distinguished Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo in Canada. Previously, he was Vice Rector and Senior Vice Rector of the United Nations University (and Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations) from 1998–2007. Educated in India and Canada, he was a Pro-fessor of International Relations at the University of Otago in New Zealand and Professor and Head of the Peace Research Centre at the Australian National University, during which time he was also a consul-tant/adviser to the Australian and New Zealand governments on arms control, disarmament and interna-tional security issues. He was a Commissioner and one of the principal authors of The Responsibility to Protect (2001), and Senior Adviser on Reforms and Principal Writer of the United Nations Secretary-General’s second reform report (2002). As author or editor of over thirty books and 300 articles and book chapters, he also writes regularly for quality newspapers around the world.

Abstract

As power and influence shift North to South, what are the implications for the normative architecture of global governance? The ICC is the culmination of the search for universal jurisdiction and emblematic of the difficulties in achieving it. In stable polities, the constitution articulates the agreed political vision for the whole community and underpins the separation of the judicial from the legislative and executive branches, enhancing the credibility of all. Such first-order questions are not settled for the international community where law and politics intersect. By not being embedded in a broader system of democratic policymaking and with no political check on it, the ICC could widen the democratic deficit in international governance. Its advancement of universal justice may prove an optical illusion if Westerners enjoy de facto impunity. Judicial romanticism and colonialism can undercut due process, the peace process, and alternative justice mechanisms. Should international justice structures, reflecting past power equations, take away agency from African societies in deciding how to balance peace, justice and reconciliation?

Wednesday, 5 May 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Nikita Dhawan (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)

Gendering Justice in a Postcolonial World

CV

Nikita DhawanNikita Dhawan is a junior professor for gender and postcolonial studies within the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders” and Director of the Frankfurt Research Center for Postcolonial Stu-dies (FRCPS). Her research interest is in political philosophy, transnational gender studies and postco-lonial theory at the Cluster of Excellence of the University of Frankfurt. Born in India, she studied philoso-phy and German language and literature at the University of Mumbai as well as gender studies at the Research Centre for Women's Studies (RCWS) at SNDT Women's University Mumbai/India. Professor Dhawan received her doctorate in 2006 from Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Her books are „Impossible Speech. On the Politics of Silence and Violence” (Academia, 2007) und “Postkoloniale Theorie: Eine kri-tische Einführung“ (Transcript, 2005 mit María do Mar Castro Varela). The most recent article is „Zwischen Empire und Empower: Dekolonisierung und Demokratisierung“ (Femina Politica - die Zeitschrift für feministische Politikwissenschaft 2/2009).

Abstract

One of the most important insights offered by postcolonial theory is that ‘the Western’ intellectual tradition is simultaneously indispensible and inadequate in understanding the realities of a postcolonial world. On the one hand, most theories of justice not only reproduce a Eurocentric but also an androcentric bias. On the other hand, when gender injustice is addressed, it is reduced to justice between the sexes, which overlooks other intersecting categories like race, class, caste, religion from a transnational perspective. The aim of this talk is to approach the question of gender justice with regard to the postcolonial world by exploring how postcolonial contexts offer important lessons for theory building on global justice as they challenge universal blueprints for implementing of norms. Drawing on discourses and experiences from the global south and third world feminism, while circumventing the dualism of universalism and cultural relativism, the attempt will be to address the following issues: How do notions of justice travel among the asymmetrical spaces of postcoloniality? How is injustice experienced in different contexts? Which gender norms are produced by theories of global justice? How are theories of (gender) justice transformed when perspectives from the global south are taken seriously?

Wednesday, 19 May 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Mohammed Ayoob (Michigan State University)

Subaltern Approach(es) to Order and Justice
A Preliminary Exploration

CV

Mohammed AyoobMohammed Ayoob is Distinguished Professor of International Relations at the Michigan State University. He holds a joint appointment in James Madison College and the Department of Political Science. Previously he held faculty appointments at the Australian National University and Jawaharlal Nehru University in India, as well as visiting appointments at Columbia, Sydney, Princeton, Oxford, and Brown Universities and at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey. A specialist on conflict and security in the Third World, he also works on the intersection of religion and politics in the Muslim world. He has acted as a consultant to the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty, the High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change appointed by the UN Secretary General. His books include „The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System“ (Lynne Rienner, 1995), „and Southeast Asia: Indian Perceptions and Policies“ (Routledge, 1990) and „The Politics of Is-lamic Reassertion“ (St. Martins, 1981). His latest book is titled „The Many Faces of Political Islam: Reli-gion and Politics in the Muslim World“ (University of Michigan Press, 2008).

Abstract

The importance of the subaltern vision of order and justice lies in the fact that the large majority of states in the international system can be categorized as subaltern for they are weak, vulnerable, and, therefore, open to external penetration. While this is a function of the early stage of state-making in which they find themselves, their vulnerabilities owe substantially to their colonial experience and the workings of an in-ternational system that concentrates power in the hands of a small number of states that form a de facto concert that controls the international security and economic agendas. According to the subaltern pers-pective, international order must be acceptable to the large majority of (subaltern) states otherwise it will continue to remain precarious and unstable. While the hegemonic standpoint emphasizes order among states and justice within them, the subaltern perspective stresses order within states and justice among them. This tension has manifested itself, although not always very neatly, in such diverse arenas of inter-national politics as humanitarian intervention, nuclear proliferation, and the emergence of political Islam as the principal ideology of resistance against global hegemony.

Wednesday, 2 June 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Siba N’Zatioula Grovogui (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore)

Can You Hear Me Now?
‘The Last Normative Order’ and Why it Collapsed

CV

Siba N. GrovoguiSiba N. Grovogui, born in Guinea, is Professor of International Relations and Political Theory at Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Political Science since July 2005. 2001-2005 he was Associate Pro-fessor, 1995–2001 Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University. From 1993- 1995 he was Assistant Professor at Eastern Michigan University. 1989 –1990 he was DuBois-Mandela-Rodney Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan. His latest books are „Beyond Eurocentrism and Anarchy: Memories of International Order and Institutions“ (Palgrave, 2006) and „Sovereigns, Quasi-Sovereigns, and Africans: Race and Self-Determination in International Law“ (University of Minnesota Press, 1996). His articles include: ‘Counterpoints and the Imaginaries Behind Them: Thinking Beyond North American and European Traditions,’ International Political Sociology. ‘No Bridges to Swamps: A Postcolonial Perspective On Disciplinary Dialogue,’ in International Relations. ‘The New Cosmopolitanisms: Contexts, Subtexts, and Pretexts,’ International Relations. ‘Regimes of Sovereignty: Rethinking International Morality and the African Condition,’ The European Journal of International Relations. ‘Come to Africa: A Hermeneutic of Race in International Theory,’ Alternatives.

Abstract

This presentation is a commentary on the processes of constitution and implementation of the postwar global normative order.  It is based on the interventions of four African intellectuals pertaining to an inci-pient ‘order of justification’ for postcolonial – and therefore global – justice, freedom, and democracy. These individuals predicted with near-atomic accuracy the coming dysfunctions and crises of governance of the postwar liberal international order. Secondly, they envisaged an alternative ‘universal’ moral (or normative) order from multiple orders of justification and diverse political and moral concerns. Thirdly, they claimed the likes of Hugo, Voltaire, Kant, Diderot, and Rousseau as their own ‘inheritance’ in equal measure with African traditions in order to legitimize their own claims to the world. The path that they outlined is one to which I subscribe and that I wish to explore further.

Wednesday, 16 June 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Emad Shahin (Kroc Institute for Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame)

Jihad, Combat, and Peace in Islam

CV

Emad ShahinEmad Shahin is Henry Luce Associate Professor of Religion, Conflict and Peacebuilding at the Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame (USA). Before coming to Notre Dame, Shahin was associate professor of political science at the American University in Cairo, visiting associate professor in the department of government at Harvard University (2006-2009), and visiting scholar in the Islamic Legal Studies Program at Harvard Law School (2006). Shahin is a comparativist who examines the foundation for democracy and political reform within Islamic law, philosophy, and political practices. His recent work includes „Political Ascent: Contemporary Islamic Movements in North Africa“ (Westview 1997), co-editorship of „Struggling over Democracy in the Middle East and North Africa“ and co-authorship of "Islam and Democracy," published in Arabic. He is the editor-in-chief of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics (Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2011), and he is co-editing The Oxford Handbook of Islam and Politics (Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2011) with John L. Esposito of Georgetown University.

Abstract

For centuries, the concept of jihad has been misunderstood and equated with “Holy War” and violence. In a post-September 11 world, Islam itself has increasingly become associated with intolerance, violence and terrorism. Pundits have coined the terms Jihadism and jihadists as a new ideological counterforce to the West, globalization, and democratic values. In his lecture, Professor Emad Shahin makes distinctions between jihad and fighting/war in Islam. He will examine the different theories of jihad in Islam, the theo-ries of war and combat, and the conditions and manner under which violence is conducted. He will ana-lyze the ideas of major contemporary Islamic thinkers who have influenced the perception and the use of jihad in modern times, how the concept has been applied by certain movements, and the structural caus-es behind violence.  Shahin will also address the ethics of peace in Islam and the major theories that focus on the principles of peace in Islam. He will analyze the factors that impede the spread and imple-mentation of these peaceful values.

Wednesday, 30 June 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ 3

Professor Yasuaki Onuma (University of Tokyo)

An “Intercivilizational” Approach to Peace and Justice

CV

Yasuaki  OnumaYasuaki Onuma is professor for International Law at the faculty of law of the University of Tokyo. He was a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School, in Princeton, Yale and at the Max-Planck-Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg i. Br.. Being a leading expert on the history of International Law and Human Rights, he has published inter alia “An Intercivilizational Approach to Human Rights“ (in press); “Human Rights, States and Civilizations“ (Chikuma Shobo, 1998); “A Normative Approach to War: Peace, War, and Justice in Hugo Grotius“ (ed., Clarendon Press, 1993); “From the Tokyo War Crimes Trial to the Philosophy of Japanese Postwar Responsibilities for War“ (2nd edition) (Toshindo, 1987); “Beyond the Myth of a Monoethnic Society“ (Toshindo, 1986); “The Tokyo War Crimes Trial: An International Symposium“ (Kodansha International, 1986). “The Need for an Intercivilizational Approach to Evaluating Human Rights” (in: Human Rights Dialogue).

Abstract

International peace and justice are usually discussed with reference to Western standards. These stan-dards are not objective however, and are often insensitive and inappropriate to non-Western realities. 
Therefore, Yasuaki Onuma argues for the development of an “intercivilizational” approach. A Western “universalist” approach assumes that a common value system based on Western philosophy will be achieved through legalistic mechanisms; an intercivilizational approach instead assumes the existence of plural value systems and seeks their integration. The notion that what is universal is something Western must be dispelled. Over and over again, the “Asian way,” Islam, the social customs of Hinduism, and the ethics of Confucianism are cited as examples of particularity, while the “European way” or Christianity are not. Unless an intercivilizational approach is adopted, it seems unlikely that a non-Western value could gain universal acceptance. That said, the major human rights instruments and declarations, to which the overwhelming majority of nations are committed, can provide a first cut at identifying intercivilizational human rights. The intercivilizational validity of existing provisions can then be measured by the degree to which their formulation is inclusive.

Lecture Series

Each of the Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence focuses on central aspects of the work of the research network from the perspective of one of the participating disciplines. Their primary goal is to enable students, colleagues and other interested parties to share in the current state of research and to engage them in discussion.

 

Past events:

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2019/2020
Haftungsrecht und Künstliche Intelligenz

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2019
Democracy in Crisis? Rupture, Regression, Resilience

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2018/2019
The End of Pacification? The Transformation of Political Violence in the 21st Century

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2017
Criminal Justice between Purity and Pluralism - Strafrechtspflege zwischen Purismus und Pluralität

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2016
Modelling Transformation

Lecture Series, Winter Semester 2015/2016
Norm Conflicts in Pluralistic Societies

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2015
Theorizing Global Order

Lecture Series, Winter Semester 2014/2015
Translating Normativity: New Perspectives on Law and Legal Transfers

Lecture Series, first half 2014
Rechtswissenschaft in Frankfurt vor den Herausforderungen der nächsten 100 Jahre - Erfahrungen und Erwartungen

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2013/14
Beyond Anarchy: Rule and Authority in the International System

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2012
Normativität und Geschichtlichkeit: Frankfurter Perspektiven II

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2011/12
Normativität: Frankfurter Perspektiven

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2011
Postsäkularismus

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2010/11
The Nature of Normativity

Lecture Series Summer Semester 2010
"Non-Western Approaches to Justice and Peace"

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2009/10
Recht ohne Staat? Zur Normativität nichtstaatlicher Rechtsetzung

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Christine Korsgaard (Harvard University)

The Normative Constitution of Agency

CV

Christine M. Korsgaard (BA University of Illinois, 1974; PhD Harvard, 1981; LHD, University of Illinois, 2004) is Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. She works on moral philosophy and its history, the theory of practical reason, the philosophy of action, personal identity, and the relations between human beings and the other animals. She is the author of four books: Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity (Oxford 2009), The Constitution of Agency (Oxford 2008), The Sources of Normativity (Cambridge 1996), and Creating the Kingdom of Ends (Cambridge 1996). She is also one of the editors of Reclaiming the History of Ethics: Essays for John Rawls (Cambridge 1997). She is currently working on Moral Animals, a book about the place of rationality and value in nature. She has held positions at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago. She won a Mellon Distinguished Achievement Award in 2004 and has served as President of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association.

Abstract

The philosophical tradition affords us two different there are naturalistic conceptions, according to which an action is essentially a movement caused by a certain kind of mental state. Second, there are normative conceptions, familiar from the tradition of political philosophy, according to which the agency of some unit is constituted by the normative relations among its parts, and an action is just a movement produced by a  properly constituted agent. For example, something done by the members of a political state counts as an action of the state only if it was enacted in the proper way by the right authorities. Some philosophers in the tradition, most notably Plato and Kant, have appealed to the idea of normative constitution to explain individual agency. These accounts may seem fanciful to modern ears, but I argue that they embody an important point: the kind of unity that is essential to agency must be normatively constituted.

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Robert Pippin (University of Chicago)

Reason’s Form

CV
Robert B. Pippin is the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought, the Department of Philosophy, and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books on German idealism, including Kant’s Theory of Form; Hegel’s Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self-Consciousness; and Modernism as a Philosophical Problem. His latest books are The Persistence of Subjectivity (Cambridge 2007), Hegel’s Practical Philosophy (Cambridge 2008), Nietzsche, Psychology and First Philosophy (Chicago 2010), and Hollywood Westerns and American Myth (Yale 2010). An expanded version of his 2009 Spinosa lectures, Hegel on Self-Consciousness: Desire and Death in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, will be published this fall. He is a winner of the Mellon Distinguished Achievement Award in the Humanities, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society.

Abstract

Kant’s theory of moral obligation is at the same time a theory of autonomy. According to Kant, true autonomy requires an agent’s subjection to the “form of pure practical reason”, and this subjection involves an unconditional obligation to obey what such a “form”, also famously called the Categorical Imperative, demands. Critics have long argued that such a subjection bears little relation to our moral experience, and that it leads to a rigoristic and empty, formalist morality. I argue here that everything depends on how we understand what Kant means by the “form” of pure practical reason, and I attempt to explain Kantian formality by attention to how he understands the notion in his theoretical philosophy. The result is a picture of Kantian morality not as subject to these traditional objections.

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Joseph Raz (Columbia University, New York)

Normativity: What Is It and How Can It Be Explained?

CV

Joseph Raz is Professor of Law at Columbia University of Arts and Sciences. 1972-85 he was professor of the philosophy of Law at Oxford University, and fellow of Balliol College, 1985-2006 Research Professor at Oxford University. He was visiting professor at Rockefeller University, Australian National University, UCLA at Berkeley, University of Toronto, Yale Law School, U. of Southern California, UC Irvine, Princeton University, U. of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Complutensa U. Madrid, and was invited to distinguished lectures (e.g., Kobe Lecture, Tokyo and Kyoto 1994; Tanner Lectures, Berkeley 2001; Storrs Lectures, Yale 2003; Minerva Lecture in Human Rights, Tel Aviv U. 2006). Honorary Doctor, Katholieke Universiteit, Brussels 1993; King´s College, London 2009. Publications include: The Authority of Law (1979, 2nd expanded ed. 2009); The Concept of a Legal System (1970, 2nd. Ed., 1980); The Morality of Freedom (1986); Practical Reasons and Norms (1975, 2nd. ed., 1980, dt. Übers. Praktische Gründe und Normen, 2006); Ethics in the Public Domain (rev. paperback ed. 1995), Engaging Reason (2000); Value, Respect, and Attachment (2001); The Practice of Value (2003); Between Authority and Interpretation (2009).

Abstract

All normative phenomena are normative in as much as, and because, they provide reasons or are partly constituted by reasons. This makes the concept of a reason key to an understanding of normativity. I will present some thoughts about the nature of normative reasons, of rationality, and of the place of normativity in our life, and the connections between sociality (i.e. the fact that people are social animals), culture and normativity.

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Thomas M. Scanlon (Harvard University)

Metaphysical Objections to Normative Truth

CV

Thomas.M. Scanlon is Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity at Harvard University. He received his B.A. from Princeton in 1962 and his Ph.D. from Harvard. In between, he studied for a year at Oxford as a Fulbright Fellow. He taught at Princeton from 1966 before coming to Harvard in 1984. Professor Scanlon’s dissertation and some of his first papers were in mathematical logic, but the bulk of his teaching and writing has been in moral and political philosophy. He has published papers on freedom of expression, the nature of rights, conceptions of welfare, and theories of justice, as well as on foundational questions in moral theory. His teaching in the department has included courses on theories of justice, equality, ethical theory, and practical reasoning. His book, What We Owe to Each Other, was published by Harvard University Press in 1998; a collection of papers on political theory, The Difficulty of Tolerance, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2003. His most recent book is Moral Dimensions Permissibility, Meaning, Blame, published by Harvard University Press in 2008. Professor Scanlon gave the John Locke Lectures, Being Realistic about Reasons, in Oxford in 2009.

Abstract

The idea that there are irreducibly normative truths about reasons for action, which we can discover by thinking carefully about reasons in the usual way, has been thought to be subject to three kinds of objections: metaphysical, epistemological, and motivational or, as I would prefer to say, practical. Metaphysical objections claim that a belief in irreducibly normative truths would commit us to facts or entities that would be metaphysically odd, incompatible, it is sometimes said, with a scientific view of the world. In this essay I argue that the idea that there are irreducibly normative truths has no problematic metaphysical implications. Explaining why this is so requires an explanation of what „ontological commitment“ comes to. It also requires an explanation of the relation between normative facts and non-normative facts, and how normative facts can depend on („supervene on“) non-normative facts without being reducible to them.

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Robert B. Brandom (University of Pittsburgh)

From German Idealism to American Pragmatism – and Back

CV

Robert Boyce Brandom is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Recipient of the A.W. Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities Award. His Ph.D. is from Princeton (1977) and his B.A. is from Yale (1972). He has held visiting fellowships at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford and at All Souls College, Oxford, and was Leibniz Professor at the University of Leipzig. He delivered the John Locke lectures at Oxford, the Woodbridge lectures at Columbia, the Hempel lectures at Princeton, the Townsend lectures at Berkeley, and the Nelson lectures at the University of Michigan. His books include Making It Explicit (Harvard 1994), Between Saying and Doing (Oxford 2008), Tales of the Mighty Dead (Harvard 2002 ), Articulating Reasons (Harvard 2000), Reason in Philosophy (Harvard 2009), and Perspectives on Pragmatism (Harvard 2011). He has edited In the Space of Reasons: Selected Papers of Wilfrid Sellars (with Kevin Scharp) (Harvard 2007), and Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind (Harvard 1997). His longtime philosophical interests include the philosophy of language, of mind, and of logic, German Idealism, pragmatism, and Wilfrid Sellars.

Abstract

Kant’s revolutionary normative turn presented judgments and intentional actions as commitments subjects are responsible for, so as subject to distinctive kinds of normative assessment. The American Pragmatists continued Hegel’s naturalizing and historicizing of this normative criterion of demarcation of sapience. This essay distinguishes what is most progressive in the pragmatists’ thought about sapience – their fundamental pragmatism (understanding knowing-that in terms of knowing-how), methodological pragmatism (semantics answers to pragmatics) and semantic pragmatism (functionalism about the relations between meaning and use) – from the instrumental pragmatism (understanding language and thought as tools) that is often identified as their characteristic doctrine. A weakness of the pragmatist tradition concerns its treatment of language, specifically, to answer the demarcation question (what distinguishes discursive practice?), which is the hinge linking the emergence question (how could and did discursive practices arise from nondiscursive ones?) and the leverage question (how is it that the transition to discursive practices brings with it so many other new capacities?). As a response to this difficulty, a return to something like the rationalist pragmatism of Hegel is recommended.

Picture gallery:

SchefoldSeelWillaschek

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Dr. Sabina Lovibond (Worcester College, Oxford University)

Practical Reason and Character-Formation


CV

Sabina Lovibond is a Fellow and Tutor in Philosophyat Worcester College, Oxford (since 1984) and a member of the Faculty of Philosophy of Oxford University. Her publications include Realism and Imagination in Ethics (Basil Blackwell and University of Minnesota Press, 1983); Ethics: A Feminist Reader (edited with Elizabeth Frazer and Jennifer Hornsby: Blackwell, 1992); Essays for David Wiggins: Identity, Truth and Value (edited with S. G. Williams: Blackwell, 1996; reissued in paperback, 2000, under the title Identity, Truth and Value: Essays for David Wiggins); Ethical Formation (Harvard University Press, 2002); Iris Murdoch, Gender and Philosophy (Routledge, forthcoming 2011); and a number of articles, mainly in ethics and feminist theory, such as ‘Feminism and Postmodernism’ in New Left Review 178 (1989).

Abstract

Anglophone ethical theory in the second half of the twentieth century found much to admire in the Aristotelian conception of phronesis - a complex mode of sensitivity to objective practical reasons, developed through initiation into a pre-existing form of social life. However, over the same period any such conception had to face the challenge of powerful sceptical considerations issuing not only from the neo-Humian ‘non-cognitivist’ tradition, but also from theoretical anti-humanism in the (continental) European style. This lecture takes its cue more from the latter type of scepticism about practical reason, and will acknowledge the essential incompleteness of the process of characterformation; but I will nevertheless suggest that a contemporary reading of ‘Platonic-Aristotelian’ ethics (to use the unitarian term favoured by H.-G. Gadamer) is as well placed as any current philosophy to show that adherence to the ethical standpoint need not be either naive or dogmatic.

Ringvorlesung WiSe 10/11

The Nature of Normativity

Wintersemester 2010/2011 des Exzellenzclusters

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ5

Plakat Ringvorlesung10-11Normativität ist das alltäglichste, und doch ein philosophisch nur schwer aufzuklärendes Phänomen. Das alltäglichste, weil wir uns in unserem Denken und Handeln an eine Reihe von Normen, Werten und Regeln gebunden sehen, ohne dass wir unmittelbar dazu gezwungen sind - etwa soziale Konventionen der Höflichkeit, ein Ethos der Professionalität, Bindungen der Freundschaft, Versprechen, die zu halten sind, bis hin zu allgemeinen moralischen Normen. Auch bei rechtlich bindenden Normen werden unterschiedliche Erklärungen ihrer Geltungsgründe gegeben. Die zentrale Frage der Normativität lautet, woraus sich die Bindekraft solcher Normen, Werte und Regeln speist: aus instrumentellen Überlegungen, aus sozialen Erwartungen, aus autonomer Selbstbindung oder aus einer normativen, vielleicht nur metaphysisch zu erklärenden Realität jenseits der empirischen Welt?

Die Philosophinnen und Philosophen, die im Rahmen dieser für die Thematik des Exzellenzclusters zentralen Ringvorlesung vortragen werden, sind die auf diesem Feld international renommiertesten ExpertInnen. Sie werden das Wesen der Normativität aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven heraus diskutieren, und so entsteht ein Panorama des state of the art der zeitgenössischen Philosophie. Die Vorlesungen werden jeweils von einem der Sprecher des Clusters eingeleitet

Programm

Mittwoch, 1. Dezember 2010, 18 Uhr
Professor Robert Pippin (University of Chicago)
Reason's Form
weitere Informationen: hier

Mittwoch, 8. Dezember 2010, 18 Uhr
Professor Christine Korsgaard (Harvard University)
The Normative Constitution of Agency
weitere Informationen: hier

Mittwoch, 15. Dezember 2010, 18 Uhr
Professor Joseph Raz (Columbia University)
Normativity: what is it and how can it be explained?
weitere Informationen: hier

Mittwoch, 12. Januar 2011, 18 Uhr
Professor Thomas M. Scanlon (Harvard University)
Metaphysical Objections to Normative Truth
weitere Informationen: hier

Mittwoch, 19. Januar 2011, 18 Uhr
Professor Robert Brandom (University of Pittsburgh)
From German Idealism to American Pragmatism – and Back
weitere Informationen: hier

Mittwoch, 16. Februar 2011, 18 Uhr
Dr. Sabina Lovibond (University of Oxford)
Practical Reason and Character-Formation
weitere Informationen: hier

Ringvorlesung SoSe 11

Postsäkularismus

Sommersemester 2011 des Exzellenzclusters

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum

altWer heute über die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen nachdenkt, kommt an der sogenannten „Rückkehr der Religion“ in den gegenwärtigen Gesellschaften, nicht nur den westlichen, nicht vorbei. Nicht dass die Religionen jemals verschwunden waren, wie das Wort der „Rückkehr“ nahezulegen scheint, aber die religiöse Dimension sozialer Konflikte hat in nationalen Kontexten wie auch global betrachtet in den letzten Jahrzehnten sehr an Bedeutung gewonnen. Denkt man an die diversen Diskussionen über Fundamentalismus und Gewalt, über das angebliche Ende oder vielmehr den Anfang multikultureller Gesellschaften und an Fragen der interkulturellen Verbindlichkeit universaler Normen wie der Menschenrechte, so sehen nicht wenige eine Wiederkehr vergangen geglaubter Zeiten religiös motivierter Kämpfe. Diese Fragen beschäftigen uns in diversen Forschungsprojekten wie auch in zentralen Veranstaltungen. Und so gehen in dieser Ringvorlesung ausgewiesene Experten der Frage nach, ob bzw. in welchem Sinne wir in einem „postsäkularen“ Zeitalter leben. Mit diesem Begriff, den Jürgen Habermas in die Debatte eingebracht hat, wird die Frage gestellt, welche Rolle die Religion in freiheitlichen und demokratischen, religiös pluralistischen Gemeinwesen spielt und spielen soll; insbesondere geht es darum, wie es möglich ist, zwischen verschiedenen religiösen, areligiösen und antireligiösen Überzeugungen, die in einer Gesellschaft aufeinanderprallen, eine gemeinsame politische Sprache zu finden – und welche Lernprozesse dazu jeweils nötig sind.

Programm

Mittwoch, 4. Mai 2011, 18 Uhr
Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Friedrich Wilhelm Graf (LMU München)

Kreationismus. Ein Kapitel aus der Religionsgeschichte der Moderne
weitere Informationen: hier...

Mittwoch, 11. Mai 2011, 18 Uhr
Dr. Bart Barendregt (Leiden University)
Funky but Shariah. Sonic Discourse on Muslim Malay Modernity
weitere Informationen: hier...

Mittwoch, 1. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr
Prof. Dr. Volkhard Krech (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)

Wiederkehr der Religion? Beobachtungen zur religiösen Lage im 20. und zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts
weitere Informationen: hier...

Mittwoch, 15. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr
Prof. Dr. Charles Taylor (McGill University Montreal)

The Meaning of ,Post-Secular'
weitere Informationen: hier...

Donnerstag, 16. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr
Prof. Dr. José Casanova (Georgetown University Washington (D.C.))
Can religions be ranked hierarchically? Stadial consciousness and religious diversity in our global post-secular age
weitere Informationen: hier...

Mittwoch, 22. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr
Prof. em. Dr. Dr. h.c. Karl Gabriel (Exzellenzcluster Religion und Politik der Universität Münster)

Der lange Abschied von der Säkularisierungsthese - und was kommt danach?
weitere Informationen: hier...

 

Mittwoch, 4. Mai 2011, 18 Uhr

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Friedrich Wilhelm Graf (LMU München)

Kreationismus. Ein Kapitel aus der Religionsgeschichte der Moderne

Abstract

Im frühen 20. Jahrhundert entsteht in den USA eine neue Form religiösen Schöpfungsglaubens, der sogenannte Kreationismus. Einst nur ein protestantisch-evangelikales Phänome, finden sich kreationistische Weltbilder inzwischen auch im Katholizismus, Judentum und Islam. Im Vortrag werden Genese, theologische Programme und die
neuen religionsübergreifenden kreationistischen Netzwerke analysiert und zugleich danach gefragt, wie sich die Erfolgsgeschichten des modernen Kreationismus deuten lassen.

CV

altFriedrich Wilhelm Graf, geboren 1948, ist seit 1999 Ordinarius für Systematische Theologie und Ethik an der Universität München. Zuvor hatte er an der Universität Augsburg (1988 bis 1992 und 1996 bis 1999) und der Universität der Bundeswehr in Hamburg gelehrt (1992 bis 1996) und war Fellow am Max-Weber-Kolleg der Universität Erfurt (1998 bis 1999). Als erster Theologe wurde er 1999 mit dem Leibniz-Preis der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft ausgezeichnet. Er ist Visiting Professor der Seigakuin University in Tokyo (seit 2000), Ordentliches Mitglied der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (seit 2001), Research Fellow der University of Pretoria (seit 2001), war 2003/2004 Stipendiat des Historischen Kollegs München und ist Elected Permanent Fellow des Wissenschaftskollegs zu Berlin (seit 2005). Von 2006 bis 2007 forschte er als Fellow ebenda. – Aktuelle Publikationen (Auswahl): (Hg.) Ernst Troeltschs „Historismus“, Gütersloh 2000, 2. Auflage 2003 [Troeltsch-Studien 11]; (Hg.) Klassiker der Theologie, München 2005; Moses Vermächtnis. Über göttliche und menschliche Gesetze, München 2006; Der  Protestantismus. Geschichte und Gegenwart, München 2006.

Bildergalerie:

altaltaltaltaltaltaltaltalt

Mittwoch, 11. Mai 2011, 18 Uhr

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Dr. Bart Barendregt (Leiden University)

Funky but Shariah. Sonic Discourse on Muslim Malay Modernity



Abstract

In this presentation Barendregt focuses on nasyid, a popular music genre that since the mid-1990s has been popular across Muslim Southeast Asia, but is especially  produced and consumed in cities and towns with a large student population and a Muslim activist tradition. The mix of pop, politics and piety will be used here to tackle the increasing complexity of post secular majority Muslim societies. Nasyid is the auditory component of a newly styled Islamic popular culture that has been successful in not only addressing questions about what it is to be a modern Muslim youth in Southeast Asia, reconciling piety with a consumerist lifestyle, but also had been expressive of their political aspirations. In Malaysia nasyid has been instrumental in propagating the ideals of the now banned Darul Arqam movement, whereas Indonesian nasyid musicians and their audiences are explicitly linked to the aspirations of the Islamist Justice Party (PKS). Both organizations have been successful in addressing the needs of young well-educated Muslims, at the same time offering them a perspective of a more righteous, utopian style communal society.

CV

altBart Barendregt is an anthropologist who lectures at the Institute of Social and Cultural Studies, Leiden University in the Netherlands. He is now as a senior researcher part time affiliated to the Royal Institute for Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV-KNAW), where he is coordinating a four year project funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Within the framework of this project, he is currently working on his book about nasyid: Islamic boy band music and the mixing of religion, youth culture and politics that has become so popular among Malaysian and Indonesian student-activists. Barendregt is as a senior researcher also affiliated to another NWO project, The Future is Elsewhere: Towards a Comparative History of Digital Futurities. At present Barendregt lectures on Southeast Asian culture and society, popular and digital culture and media anthropology. – Selected publications: Films: 2007, Generasi Jempol / The Finger Top Generation: Mobile Modernities in Contemporary Java. DVD Documentary (32 minutes). Leiden University in collaboration with Sorot Media: Leiden, Yogyakarta;
Chapters and articles: 2011 ‘Pop, Politics and Piety: Nasyid Boy band Music in Muslim Southeast Asia’, in Weintraub, A. N. (ed.) Islam and popular culture in Indonesia and Malaysia, pp. 235-256. London: Routledge; 2011, ‘Tropical Spa Cultures, Eco-chic, and the Complexities of New Asianism’, in Van Dijk, C. and J. Gelman Taylor (eds) Cleanliness in Southeast Asia. Leiden: KITLV Press.

Mittwoch, 1. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Dr. Volkhard Krech (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)

Wiederkehr der Religion? Beobachtungen zur religiösen Lage im 20. und zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts

Abstract

Der Vortrag erörtert die Fragen, ob die Annahme einer Säkularisierung im Sinne der abnehmenden Wichtigkeit von Religion empirischen Befunden stand hält und ob derzeit eine Bedeutungszunahme zu verzeichnen ist. Im Einzelnen wird ein Überblick über die gegenwärtige religiöse Lage im internationalen Maßstab gegeben und Entwicklungen auf verschiedenen gesellschaftlichen Ebenen am Beispiel Deutschlands im 20. Jahrhundert nachgezeichnet. Dabei wird die These begründet, dass – jedenfalls in westlichen Gesellschaften – nicht religiöse Überzeugungen und Praktiken selbst zunehmen, sondern die Kommunikation über Religion, und sie zu einem Marker innerhalb von „Identitätspolitiken“ wird. Prof. Dr. Volkhard Krech, Ruhr-Universität Bochum

CV

altVolkhard Krech, geb. 1962, ist seit 2004 Professor für Religionswissenschaft an der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. In den Jahren 1995 bis 2004 war er Referent für Religionssoziologie an der Forschungsstätte der Evangelischen Studiengemeinschaft in Heidelberg. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte sind: Sozialwissenschaftliche Religionstheorie, religiöser Pluralismus und Globalisierung, Religion und Gewalt, Religion und Kunst, Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Religionsforschung. – Wichtigste
Veröffentlichungen: Religion und Kunst, in: Birgit Weyel und Wilhelm Gräb (Hgg.), Religion in der modernen Lebenswelt, Göttingen 2006, 101-117; Götterdämmerung. Auf der Suche nach Religion, Bielefeld 2003; Sacrifice and Holy War: A Study of Religion and Violence. P. 1005-1021 in W. Heitmeyer and J. Hagan (eds.): International Handbook of Violence Research, Dordrecht/Boston/London 2003; Wissenschaft und Religion. Studien zur Geschichte der Religionsforschung
in Deutschland 1871 bis 1933, Tübingen 2002; Religionssoziologie, Bielefeld 1999; Georg Simmels Religionstheorie, Tübingen 1998.

 

Wednesday, 15 June 2011, 6pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ2

Prof. Dr. Charles Taylor (McGill University Montreal)

The Meaning of ,Post-Secular'



Abstract

The advance of secularity, in the three dimensions which are discussed in Taylor’s book “A Secular Age”, has not been reversed. There is no “postsecular age” in this sense. But what has decisively changed is that the earlier “secularization” narrative, to the effect that modernity must lead to a decline of religion, to the point even possibly of disappearance, has been discredited. The “postsecular” doesn’t refer to a new social condition, but to a changed understanding of our present condition, and even a changed understanding mainly on the part of academics and intellectuals. This changed understanding, however, makes us aware that we need new policies in many areas. So the interesting topic is the changed understanding we need of our secularist regimes which are just as clearly necessary as they always were, but we have
to see them in a new light.

 

CV

Charles Taylor is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at McGill University, Montreal. Born in 1931 in Canada, he studied at McGill University in Montreal and at Oxford University, where he acquired his Ph.D. in 1961. Charles Taylor taught political philosophy at McGill University from 1961 to 1997. During his academic career, he held several guest professorships, among others at the universities in Oxford and Princeton and at the Goethe University Frankfurt and the Hebrew University Jerusalem.
– Selected recent publications: Dilemmas and Connections: Selected Essays (Harvard University Press, 2011); A Secular Age (Harvard University Press, 2007); Modern Social Imaginaries (Duke University Press, 2004); Varieties of Religion Today: William James Revisited (Harvard University Press, 2002).

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 16 June 2011, 6pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. Dr. José Casanova (Georgetown University Washington (D.C.))

Can religions be ranked hierarchically? Stadial consciousness and religious diversity in our global post-secular age


Abstract

The lecture will explore the tension between our stadial theories of religious evolution which link processes of religious rationalization to genealogical explanations of our modern secular age and therefore need to establish hierarchic asymmetries between lower and higher forms of religion and our phenomenological post-secular  consciousness which can experience all human religious forms, from the most “primitive” to the most “postmodern”, as formally equal and symmetrical within the immanent frame of our post-secular global age.

 

CV

José Casanova is Professor of Sociology and Senior Fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University, where he heads the Program on Religion, Globalization, and the Secular. Previously he served as Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research in New York from 1987 to 2007 and has held visiting appointments at New York University, at Columbia University, at Vienna's Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, at the Central European University in Budapest, at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, at the Freie Universität Berlin, at the University of Uppsala, and at the Lichtenberg-Kolleg in Göttingen. He has published widely in the areas of sociological theory, religion and politics, transnational migration, and globalization. His best-known work, Public Religions in the Modern World (Chicago, 1994) has become a modern classic in the field and has been translated into six languages, including Japanese and Arabic, and is forthcoming in Indonesian, Farsi, and Chinese. He is also the author of Europa's Angst vor der Religion (Berlin U.P., 2009).


Mittwoch, 22. Juni 2011, 18 Uhr

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ5

Prof. em. Dr. Dr. h.c. Karl Gabriel (Exzellenzcluster Religion und Politik der Universität Münster)

Der lange Abschied von der Säkularisierungsthese - und was kommt danach?



Abstract

Die Vorlesung geht im ersten Schritt dem Ursprung der Säkularisierungsthese und ihrer Bedeutung für das Selbstverständnis der europäischen Intellektuellen nach. Der lange Abschied von der Säkularisierungsthese, um den es im zweiten Punkt geht, bekommt vor diesem Hintergrund besonders scharfe Konturen. Im dritten Anlauf geht es um die Frage, was nach der Säkularisierungsthese kommt. Als direkte Gegenthese hat die Vorstellung einer Revitalisierung der Religion, ihrer Rückkehr bzw. Wiederkehr Interesse auf sich gezogen. Wie ich zu zeigen versuche, bleibt aber auch diese These unbefriedigend. Deshalb möchte ich mich im vierten Schritt auf die Suche nach einem Deutungsrahmen machen, der an die Konzeption der multiplen Modernen anknüpft. Es soll gezeigt werden, dass die These der Vielfalt religiöser Modernisierung die gegenwärtige Lage von Religion und Christentum besser dem Verständnis zu erschließen vermag als die beiden konkurrierenden Positionen.

CV

altKarl Gabriel, geboren 1943, ist seit 2009 Senior Professor am Exzellenzcluster Religion und Politik der Universität Münster. Von 1980 bis 1998 war er Professor für Soziologie, Pastoralsoziologie und Caritaswissenschaft an der Katholischen Fachhochschule Norddeutschland Osnabrück/Vechta. In der Zeit von 1998 bis 2009 war er Professor für Christliche Sozialwissenschaften an der Katholisch-Theologischen Fakultät der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster und Direktor des Instituts für Christliche Sozialwissenschaften. Im Jahre 2010 erhielt er die Ehrenpromotion der Theologischen Fakultät der Universität Luzern. –Neuere Veröffentlichungen (Auswahl): Ambulante Pflege zwischen Familie, Staat und Markt. Freiburg im Breisgau 2004 (zusammen mit H. Geller); Evaluierung Exposure- und Dialogprogramme (EDP) e.V. von 1996 bis 2004. Bonn 2004 (zusammen mit Heribert Weiland, Helmut Geller, Carina Sarstedt); Caritas und Sozialstaat unter Veränderungsdruck.
Analysen und Perspektiven, Münster 2006: Lit (Reihe Diakonik Band 1); Die Situation ausländischer Priester in Deutschland. Studie im Auftrag der Wissenschaftlichen Arbeitsgruppe für weltkirchliche Aufgaben (zusammen mit Rainer Achtermann und Stefan Leibold) (im Erscheinen); Religionsfreiheit und Pluralismus. Entwicklungslinien
eines katholischen Lernprozesses. Band 1 der Reihe Katholizismus zwischen Religionsfreiheit und Gewalt, Paderborn 2010 (zusammen mit Christian Spieß und Katja Winkler).

Bildergalerie:

KohlGabrielaltLutz-Bachmannalt

Wednesday, 26 October 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Nikita Dhawan

Negotiating Normativity: Challenges and Prospects

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Norms emerge historically in specific cultural and political contexts to provide evaluative criteria to critically assess our socio-cultural, legal and economic practices. They are action-guiding and operate as an ideal against which practices and subjects are rendered legible and recognizable within a specific framework. Normative intelligibility is deeply linked to survival, whereby subjects that fall outside hegemonic norms of recognition are vulnerable to normative violence. This indicates the aspirational and orchestrating effects of norms as well as their regulative and coercive dimensions. Normative orders are justified insofar as those subject to them have the possibility of intervening and transforming these orders. The capacity to challenge hegemonic norms presupposes an ability to negotiate one’s relation to norms. A critical engagement with hegemonic framings entails a debate regarding the terms of recognition and contents of normative judgements. This is not a call for undermining all normative claims; rather the emphasis is on the need to devise new constellations of normativity, which would enable subjects struggling for enfranchisement. Normativity is a site of political agency, even as the vulnerability of the subject is closely related to normative regulations. Thus, political contest entails exceeding and reworking hegemonic norms; it rests on negotiating normativity. The talk will address the challenges and prospects in attempting to make possible new claims and articulations of normativity.

CV

Nikita Dhawan is Junior Professor of Political Science with a focus on Gender/Postcolonial Studies and Director of the Frankfurt Research Center for Postcolonial Studies (FRCPS), Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders” at the Goethe-University Frankfurt a.M. She has held short-term Visiting Professorships at University of La Laguna/Spain, University of Kassel, Pusan National University/South Korea, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer Guest Professor at University of Oldenburg In Spring 2008 she was Visiting Scholar at Columbia University, New York. She received her doctorate in Philosophy from Ruhr-University Bochum and holds a double M.A. in German Studies and Philosophy from Mumbai University/India.
Recent publications include: Soziale (Un)Gerechtigkeit: Kritische Perspektiven auf Diversität, Intersektionalität und Anti-Diskriminierung (ed.) (forthcoming), “Hegemony and  Heteronormativity: Rethinking ‘the Political’ in Queer Politics” (ed.) (2011), “Impossible Speech: On the Politics of Silence and Violence” (2007) and “Postkoloniale Theorie: Eine kritische Einführung” (2005).

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 2 November, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Thomas Schmidt

Die „Heiligkeit des Rechts“
Autonomie und Autorität normativer Geltung

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Mit der Rede von der „Heiligkeit des Rechts“ haben Kant und Hegel den besonderen Charakter der unbedingten Geltung von Rechtsnormen zum Ausdruck gebracht. Kant zufolge „ist in der ganzen Welt nichts so heilig, als das Recht anderer Menschen“, Hegel bestimmt das Recht „als etwas Heiliges überhaupt, weil es das Dasein der selbstbewussten Freiheit ist“. Beide wollen mit der Formel von der Heiligkeit des Rechts gerade die Autonomie normativer Geltung betonen, die ihre Autorität ausschließlich vernünftiger Selbstbestimmung verdankt und nicht von vorreflexiven sakralen Voraussetzungen abhängt. Die Säkularisierung des Rechts wird also gerade von einer rhetorischen Sakralisierung der Autorität autonomer Vernunft begleitet und gestützt. Eine Interpretation der Rede von der Heiligkeit des Rechts ist daher nicht nur geeignet, die in der Moralphilosophie und politischen Theorie immer wieder neu aufbrechende Kontroverse zwischen kantianischen und hegelianischen Strategien der Normbegründung in einer bestimmten Perspektive zu belichten, sondern auch die systematische Frage zu adressieren, wie unter postsäkularen Bedingungen die Autonomie und Autorität von Normativität verstanden und begründet werden kann.

CV

Thomas M. Schmidt, Professor für Religionsphilosophie am Fachbereich Katholische Theologie und kooptierter Professor am Institut für Philosophie, Fachbereich Philosophie und Geschichtswissenschaften der Goethe-Universität; Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, Hauptantragsteller des DFG-Graduiertenkollegs 1728 „Theologie als Wissenschaft“. Zur Zeit Fellow am Max-Weber-Kolleg und kooptierter Gastwissenschaftler der Kolleg-Forschergruppe „Religiöse Individualisierung in historischer Perspektive“ der Universität Erfurt. Arbeitsbereiche: Religionsphilosophie, Politische Philosophie, Deutscher Idealismus, Pragmatismus, Diskurstheorie. Wichtigste Publikationen: Moderne Religion? Theologische und religionsphilosophische Reaktionen auf Jürgen Habermas (hg. gem. mit Knut Wenzel), Freiburg-Basel-Wien: Herder 2009; Discorso Religioso e Religione Discorsiva nella Societá Postsecolare, Torino: Trauben 2009; Religion in der pluralistischen Öffentlichkeit (hg. gem. mit Michael Parker), Würzburg: Echter 2008; Anerkennung und absolute Religion. Formierung der Gesellschaftstheorie und Genese der spekulativen Religionsphilosophie in Hegels Frühschriften, Stuttgart/Bad Cannstatt: frommann-holzboog 1997.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 9 November 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Stefan Gosepath

Die soziale Natur der Normativität

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Die von Gosepath vertretene Konzeption von Normativität versteht Vernunft als die Fähigkeit zur Erkenntnis des Verpflichtetseins, Gründe zu geben. Der eigentümliche  Verpflichtungscharakter normativer Vernunftansprüche wird in dem Ansatz auf die Sozialisation in eine der menschlichen Existenzweise eigentümlichen, zweiten, nämlich sozialen Natur zurückgeführt. Durch die Übernahme und Internalisierung sozialer Bewertungen in einer Praxis nehmen wir ein Bewertungsschema an, das für uns normative Autorität erhält. Gründe können so mit Wünschen gekoppelt sein, die die notwendige kausale Motivation zum Handeln erzeugen. Als reflexives Vermögen ist die Vernunft jedoch auch zur kritisch-reflexiven Überprüfung ihrer eigenen sozialen Wurzeln in der gelebten Praxis und damit der erlernten Gründe fähig.

CV

Stefan Gosepath ist Professor für Internationale Politische Theorie und Philosophie an der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und zugleich Direktor der Kolleg-Forschergruppe Justitia Amplificata: Erweiterte Gerechtigkeit – konkret und global. Er lehrt, forscht und publiziert vor allem zu Themen der praktischen Vernunft und Normativität, der Gerechtigkeit, der Menschenrechte und globalen Gerechtigkeit sowie Moral.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 23 November 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Peter Niesen

Zwei Modelle kosmopolitischer Normativität

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Der Streit über den Kosmopolitismus in der politischen Philosophie der Gegenwart wird beherrscht von der Idee einheitlicher globaler Institutionen. Ihr entspricht die Vorstellung vom Weltbürgertum als Mitgliedschaft in einem (zu schaffenden) globalen Gemeinwesen. Eine konkurrierende Vorstellung, die ebenfalls auf institutionelle Reform zielt, geht auf die politische Philosophie der Aufklärung (Rousseau, Kant, Bentham) zurück. In dieser Tradition werden Weltbürger als Aktivbürger beliebiger Einzelstaaten verstanden, und kosmopolitische Staaten sind solche, die sich für universelle Partizipation öffnen. An Beispielen soll gezeigt werden, dass das ältere Modell auch heute noch eine wichtige Rolle spielen kann: bei der Interpretation
grenzüberschreitender politischer Mobilisierung ebenso wie bei dem Versuch, Republikanismus und Kosmopolitismus miteinander zu vermitteln.

CV

Peter Niesen ist Professor für Politische Theorie und Ideengeschichte an der Technischen Universität Darmstadt. Arbeitsschwerpunkte: Politische Freiheit, Demokratie, Kant, Bentham. Wichtigste Publikationen: Colonialism and Hospitality, in: Politics and Ethics Review 3, 2007; Kants Theorie der Redefreiheit, Baden-Baden 2. Aufl. 2008; Kommentarband zu Immanuel Kant, Zum ewigen Frieden (mit Oliver Eberl), Berlin 2011; Banning the Former Ruling Party, in: Constellations 2011 (im Erscheinen).

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 30 November 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff

Genese und Scheitern - Normativität im Streit

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

In der politischen Ordnung jenseits des Nationalstaats ist die Frage von Normativität von besonderer Bedeutung, denn in einer Ordnung, die nahezu ohne hierarchische Sanktionsmechanismen oder substanzielle gemeinsame Wertbestände auskommen muss, scheint die Grundlage von Normativität immer prekär zu sein. Daher eignet sich diese Ordnung auch in besonderer Weise, der Quelle von Normativität als Bindung ohne Fessel nachzuspüren. Welche Kraft kann diese Bindung erschaffen und was lässt sie zerfallen? Jenseits von externen Sanktionen und gemeinsamen Wertvorstellungen rückt dabei das Verfahren von Normgenese und -anwendung ins Zentrum der Analyse.

CV

Nicole Deitelhoff, Professorin für Internationale Beziehungen und Theorien globaler Ordnung im Exzellenzcluster. Arbeitsschwerpunkte: Internationale Institutionen, transnationale Formen von Herrschaft und Opposition. Ausgewählte Publikationen: Überzeugung in der Politik (2006), The Discursive Process of Legalization. Charting Islands of Persuasion in the ICC Case (International Organization 2009); Grenzen der Verständigung. Zu den Voraussetzungen der Einhegung kultureller Fragmentierung im internationalen Regieren in: Staatlichkeit ohne Staat. Chancen und Aporien von Recht, Verfassung und Demokratie jenseits des Nationalstaats, hrsg. mit Jens Steffek, 2009.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 7 December 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Marcus Willaschek

Soziale Geltung und normative Gültigkeit
Eine sozial-pragmatische Konzeption von Normativität

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Eine Norm hat „soziale Geltung“ in einer Gemeinschaft, wenn sie in dieser Gemeinschaft weitestgehend befolgt und faktisch anerkannt wird. Soziale Geltung ist ein historisch und sozial
wandelbares Phänomen. Eine sozial geltende Norm lässt sich jedoch wiederum an einem normativen Maßstab messen: Ist es richtig (gerecht, angemessen), dass diese Norm soziale Geltung hat? Eine Norm, die diesem Maßstab genügt, ist „normativ gültig“. Offenbar gibt es viele Beispiele für sozial geltende Normen, die in diesem Sinn keine normative Gültigkeit besitzen. Doch worauf gründet sich der Maßstab normativer Gültigkeit und in welchem Verhältnis steht er zur sozialen Geltung von Normen? Es wird untersucht, inwieweit sich ein „objektiver“ (d.h. nicht historisch und sozial relativierter) Maßstab normativer Gültigkeit aus dem Phänomen sozialer Geltung heraus entwickeln lässt, ohne auf metaphysische oder transzendentale Voraussetzungen zu rekurrieren.

CV

Marcus Willaschek ist Professor für Philosophie der Neuzeit an der Universität Frankfurt am Main. Veröffentlichungen (Auswahl): Praktische Vernunft. Handlungstheorie und  Moralbegründung bei Kant, Stuttgart/Weimar 1992; Der mentale Zugang zur Welt. Realismus, Skeptizismus und Intentionalität, Frankfurt 2003; Kant: Kritik der reinen Vernunft (hg. mit G. Mohr), Berlin 1998; Hilary Putnam und die Tradition des Pragmatismus (hg. mit M.-L. Raters), Frankfurt 2002. In Vorbereitung: Kant-Lexikon (hg. mit G. Mohr, J. Stolzenberg und St. Bacin), Berlin/New York. Zahlreiche Aufsätze u.a. zur Philosophie Kants und zu Fragen der Handlungstheorie, Erkenntnistheorie und Metaphysik.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 14 December 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Christoph Menke

Gesetz und Freiheit
Überlegungen im Anschluss an Hegel

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Hegels Grundthese zur Normativität lautet, dass Sollen in Sein gründet: Gesetze müssen als „seiende“ verstanden werden, um uns ein Sollen vorschreiben zu können. Gesetze müssen als konstitutiv für dasjenige Subjekt (und die Praxis, deren Teilnehmer es ist) verstanden werden, dessen Vollzüge sie regulieren sollen oder wollen. Im Gegensatz zu neoaristotelischen Artikulationen dieses Gedankens (Korsgaard, McDowell) ist damit die Frage nach der Freiheit des Subjekts aber nicht schon beantwortet, sondern stellt sich, im Gegenteil, in neuer, verschärfter Form. Hegels kritische Diagnose lautet, dass die Konstitution des Subjekts durch Gesetze Herrschaft impliziert. Die paradoxe Aufgabe lautet daher, die Konstitution des Subjekts durch Gesetze mit der Befreiung des Subjekts von Gesetzen zusammen zu denken.

CV

Christoph Menke, Professor für Praktische Philosophie im Exzellenzcluster. Arbeitsschwerpunkte: Politische und Rechtsphilosophie; Ästhetik. Buchveröffentlichungen (Auswahl): Die Souveränität der Kunst (1988); Tragödie im Sittlichen (1996); Spiegelungen der Gleichheit (2000, 2004); Die Gegenwart der Tragödie. Versuch über Urteil und Spiel (2005); Kraft. Ein Grundbegriff ästhetischer Anthropologie (2008); Recht und Gewalt (2011).

 

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 21 Dezember 2011, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Dr. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann

Praktische Vernunft, Diskurs und Gewissen

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Die Diskurstheorie hat an die Stelle des von Kant als Überprüfung der Richtigkeit von moralischen Normen eingeführten Kategorischen Imperativs die argumentative Rechtfertigung im ethischen Diskurs und die zwanglose Zustimmung aller potenziellen Teilnehmer gerückt. Im Rekurs auf eine klassische Theorie des moralischen Gewissens möchte ich der Frage nachgehen, ob diese, von der Diskurstheorie vorgeschlagene Argumentation überzeugt. Dabei wird es darum gehen, den Zusammenhang von praktischer Vernunft und Gewissen, allgemein überzeugenden Argumenten und individueller Einsicht herauszuarbeiten, um das Prinzip der ethischen Normativität im Bezug auf und in Unterscheidung von der Normativität des Rechts schärfer herauszuarbeiten.

CV

Prof. Dr. Dr. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann ist seit 1994 Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main; seit 2002 „Adjunct Professor“ für Philosophie der Saint Louis University, USA; seit 2007 Mitglied des Direktoriums des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“; seit 2009 Vizepräsident der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. Forschungsschwerpunkte: Praktische Philosophie, Geschichte der Philosophie und Wissenschaften des Mittelalters, Politische Philosophie Internationaler Beziehungen, Religionsphilosophie. Wichtigste Publikationen (Auswahl): M. Kühnlein/M. Lutz-Bachmann (Hgg.), Unerfüllte Moderne? Neue Perspektiven auf das Werk von Charles Taylor, Berlin 2011; M. Lutz-Bachmann/A. Niederberger/P. Schink (Hgg.), Kosmopolitanismus. Zur Geschichte und Zukunft eines umstrittenen Ideals, Weilerswist 2010; A. Fidora/M. Lutz-Bachmann/A. Wagner (Hgg.), Lex und Ius. Beiträge zur Begründung des Rechts in der Philosophie des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit, Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt 2010; M. Lutz-Bachmann, Wissenskultur im Aufbruch: Zur Neuformierung der ‚Politischen Theorie’ im Mittelalter, in: Johannes Fried/Michael Stolleis (Hgg.), Wissenskulturen. Über die Erzeugung und Weitergabe von Wissen, Frankfurt am Main 2009. S. 43-57; M. Lutz-Bachmann/A. Niederberger (Hgg.), Krieg und Frieden im Prozess der Globalisierung, Weilerswist 2009; M. Lutz-Bachmann/A. Fidora (Hgg.), Handlung und Wissenschaft: Die Epistemologie der praktischen Wissenschaften im 13. und 14. Jahrhundert, Berlin 2008.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 11 January 2012, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Martin Seel

Ein Dialog zwischen Aristoteles und Kant über die Grundlagen der Moral

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Auf den ersten Blick vertreten Aristoteles und Kant höchst kontroverse Auffassungen über die Einheit des individuell guten und des sozial gerechten Lebens. Auf einen zweiten Blick aber erweisen sich ihre Positionen gerade in dieser Frage als durchaus kompatibel. Der Vortrag wird einen fiktiven Gedankenaustausch zwischen Aristoteles und Kant inszenieren, der, wie es bei produktiven Gesprächen zu sein pflegt, eine Annäherung der beiden mit diesen Autoren verbundenen Traditionen der Ethik möglich erscheinen lässt.

CV

Martin Seel ist Professor für Philosophie an der Goethe-Universität. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen in der Erkenntnistheorie und Sprachphilosophie, der Ethik sowie der Ästhetik. Zu seinen Veröffentlichungen zählen: Versuch über die Form des Glücks, Frankfurt/M. 1996; Ästhetik des Erscheinens, München 2000; Sich bestimmen lassen. Studien zur theoretischen und praktischen Philosophie, Frankfurt/M. 2002; In der Welt der Sprache. Konsequenzen des semantischen Holismus, Frankfurt/M. 2008 (zus. m. Georg Bertram, David Lauer und Jasper Liptow); Theorien, Frankfurt/M. 2009; 111 Tugenden, 111 Laster. Eine philosophische Revue, Frankfurt/M. 2011.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 18 January 2012, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Axel Honneth

Die Normativität der Sittlichkeit Institutionelle Grundlagen von Autonomie

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

In meinem Vortrag möchte ich im Anschluss an Hegel die Bindungskraft von (moralischen) Normen aus dem Umstand erklären, dass sie als jeweils bereits institutionalisierte Handlungsregeln das sind, was uns überhaupt erst zu selbstbewussten Akteuren in sozialen Interaktionen werden lässt; insofern geht der moralischen Autonomie des Einzelnen die „Sittichkeit“ gesellschaftlich eingeübter und bewährter Praktiken immer schon voraus. Weil mit einem solchem Begriff der „Normativität“ allerdings die Gefahr entsteht, moralische Geltung mit sozialer Gültigkeit gleichzusetzen, soll in einem zweiten Schritt gezeigt werden, dass die sittliche Gewohnheit hier nach dem Muster des „Schreibens“ oder „Lesens“ mit einer gewissen reflexiven Beweglichkeit und Korrigierbarkeit versehen werden muss; nur diejenige institutinalisierte Handlungspraxis, die Raum für solche Arten von sittlicher Orientierung bietet, besitzt über soziale Gültigkeit hinaus auch moralische Geltungskraft.

CV

Axel Honneth ist Professor für Sozialphilosophie am Institut für Philosophie der Goethe-Universität und Direktor des Instituts für Sozialforschung in Frankfurt am Main; seit 2011 außerdem Jack C. Weinstein Professor of the Humanities am Department of Philosophy an der Columbia University in New York. Forschungsschwerpunkte: Sozialphilosophie, Moralphilosophie und politische Philosophie; Kritische Theorie; philosophische Anthropologie; systematische Grundlagen einer Theorie der Anerkennung: Rekonstruktion der Moralität interpersoneller Beziehungen, Entwicklung einer pluralen Theorie der Anerkennung; im Bereich der Logik der Sozialwissenschaften: Fortentwicklung einer kritischen Gesellschaftstheorie durch Auseinandersetzung mit neueren Ansätzen der Sozialontologie und der Systemtheorie. Ausgewählte Publikationen: Kampf um Anerkennung. Zur moralischen Grammatik sozialer Konflikte, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp 1992; erw. Auflage 2003; (zus. mit Nancy Fraser): Umverteilung oder Anerkennung? Eine politisch-philosophische Kontroverse, Frankfurt/M: Suhrkamp 2003; Verdinglichung. Eine anerkennungstheoretische Studie, Frankfurt/M: Suhrkamp 2005; Patholo-gien der Vernunft. Geschichte und Gegenwart der kritischen Theorie, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp 2007; Das Ich im Wir. Studien zur Anerkennungstheorie (Aufsatzband), Berlin: Suhrkamp 2010; Das Recht der Freiheit. Grundriß einer demokratischen Sittlichkeit, Berlin: Suhrkamp 2011.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 25 January 2012, 6.15pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst

Zu einer Kritik der rechtfertigenden Vernunft

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Die Vernunft ist das Vermögen, die aktiven Weltbezüge des Menschen auf begründete Weise zu ordnen und damit zu rechtfertigen – ob es um das Erkennen, das Urteilen oder das Handeln geht. Die das Handeln rechtfertigende, praktische Vernunft ist immer schon in praktischen Kontexten verortet und muss begründbare Antworten auf normative Fragen finden, die sich in diesen Kontexten stellen – solche des guten Lebens, des Rechts, der politischen und sozialen Gerechtigkeit und der Moral. Eine Kritik der rechtfertigenden Vernunft hat die Aufgabe, die Geltungskriterien dieser Kontexte zu rekonstruieren – auch so, dass sie reflexiv ebenfalls kritisiert werden können. Sie stößt dabei freilich auf Fragen, die ihre eigene Praxis betreffen: Muss die Rechtfertigung selbst eine soziale, diskursive Praxis sein, und in welchem Sinne? Dies führt zu einer „Kritik der  Rechtfertigungsverhältnisse“ als Aufgabe kritischer Theorie. Aber  daneben: Welchen normativen Status hat das Vernunftprinzip der gebotenen, reziprok-allgemein nicht zurückweisbaren Rechtfertigung im Kontext der Moral: Ist es nicht selbst ein moralisches Prinzip? Wie ist der Grundsatz der Rechtfertigung letztlich gerechtfertigt?

CV

Rainer Forst ist Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie an der Goethe Universität, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“, stellv. Sprecher der Kollegforschergruppe „Justitia Amplificata“ und Permanent Fellow am Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften in Bad Homburg. Zuvor lehrte er an der FU Berlin, der New School for Social Research in New York und am Dartmouth College (New Hampshire). Er arbeitet zu Grundfragen der Moralphilosophie und der politischen Theorie. Wichtigste Veröffentlichungen: Kontexte der Gerechtigkeit (Suhrkamp 1994, engl. Univ. of California Press 2002), Toleranz im Konflikt (Suhrkamp 2003, Cambridge UP i.E.), Das Recht auf Rechtfertigung (Suhrkamp 2007, Columbia UP 2011), Kritik der Rechtfertigungsverhältnisse (Suhrkamp 2011, Polity Press in Vorb.). Er ist Mitglied des Herausgeberkreises von Ethics, Political Theory sowie des European Journal of Political Theory und einer Reihe weiterer internationaler Zeitschriften; zudem gibt er die Reihen „Theorie und Gesellschaft“ und „Normative Orders“ bei Campus heraus.

Picture gallery:

Wednesday, 8 February 2012, 6pm

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther

Die Normativität des Rechts

Video:

Audio:

Abstract

Gegenwärtig wird der Normativität des Rechts überwiegend eine dienende oder instrumentelle Bedeutung für normative Ordnungen anderer Art zugeschrieben. Das Recht setzt durch und organisiert – vorzugsweise mit Mitteln der Zwangsandrohung – was in den Ordnungen der Moral, der Politik oder, im Zuge der funktional sich differenzierenden Weltgesellschaft, in anderen sozialen Systemen (vor allem: der Ökonomie) an normativ verbindlichen Handlungsgründen entstanden und gerechtfertigt worden ist. So werden die Menschenrechte als moralisch  begründete Rechte betrachtet, deren rechtsförmige Positivierung und Durchsetzung ebenfalls moralisch gefordert ist. Oder die Funktionsbedingungen einer globalisierten Ökonomie werden als hinreichender Grund für eine bestimmte normative Ordnung behauptet, die vom Recht auszugestalten und durchzusetzen sei. Die Vorlesung will der Frage nachgehen, ob der Normativität des Rechts neben seiner Service-Funktion auch eine eigenständige Bedeutung (und Begründung) zukommt, ob vielleicht sogar diese Serviceleistungen gar nicht möglich sind, ohne dass Recht zugleich konstituierend ist. Wenn diese Hypothese zutrifft, dann wäre weiter zu fragen, ob und inwiefern die konstitutive Normativität des Rechts ihrerseits die Normativität anderer normativer Ordnungen strukturiert.

CV

Klaus Günther ist Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozeßrecht an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ sowie Fellow und Mitglied des Direktoriums am Forschungskolleg Humanwissenschaften der Goethe-Universität in Bad Homburg v.d.H. Veröffentlichungen (Auswahl): Falscher Friede durch repressives Völkerstrafrecht?, in: W. Beulke, K. Lüderssen, A. Popp & P. Wittig (eds.), Das Dilemma des rechtsstaatlichen Strafrechts. Symposium für Bernhard Haffke zum 65. Geburtstag, Berlin: BWV, 2009, pp. 79–100; Die naturalistische Herausforderung des Schuldstrafrechts, in: S. Schleim, T. M. Spranger & H. Walter (eds.), Von der Neuroethik zum Neurorecht?, Göttingen: Vandenhoek, 2009, pp. 214-242; Liberale und diskurstheoretische Deutungen der Menschenrechte, in: W. Brugger, U. Neumann & S.Kirste (eds.), Rechtsphilosophie im 21. Jahrhundert, Frankfurt/M.: Suhrkamp, 2008, pp. 338-359; Schuld und kommunikative Freiheit. Studien zur individuellen Zurechnung strafbaren Unrechts im demokratischen Rechtsstaat, Frankfurt/M.: Vittorio Klostermann, 2005.

Picture gallery:

Dhawan RV

Video der Ringvorlesung Dhawan:

 

 

Lecture Series Winter Semester 2011/2012

Normativity: Frankfurt Perspectives


Normativity is the concept for a phenomenon that is common but at the same time difficult to explain, which poses one question: What does the power consist of that brings us to comply to principles, norms and rules of various kinds? Normativity is a kind of bind without chains and the explanations, from where it comes, reach from self-centered deliberations over social explanations up to the assumption of objective values beyond the empirical world. In the interdisciplinary research cluster “Normative Orders” these question play a central role. The lecture series is a continuation of the past series of lectures “The Nature of Normativity” of the winter semester 2010/11 with perspectives of Frankfurt researchers.

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ3

Poster (pdf): click here...

Programme:

Wednesday, 26 October 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Nikita Dhawan
Negotiating Normativity: Challenges and Prospects
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 2 November 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Thomas M. Schmidt
Die „Heiligkeit des Rechts“. Autonomie und Autorität normativer Geltung
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 9 November 2011, 6.15pm

Prof. Stefan Gosepath
Die soziale Natur der Normativität
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 23 November 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Peter Niesen
Zwei Modelle kosmopolitischer Normativität
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 30 November 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Nicole Deitelhoff
Genese und Scheitern
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 7 December 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Marcus Willaschek
Soziale Geltung und normative Gültigkeit. Eine sozial-pragmatische Konzeption von Normativität
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 14 December 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Christoph Menke
Gesetz und Freiheit. Überlegungen im Anschluss an Hegel
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 21 Dezember 2011, 6.15pm
Prof. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann
Praktische Vernunft, Diskurs und Gewissen
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 11 January 2012, 6.15pm
Prof. Martin Seel
Ein Dialog zwischen Aristoteles und Kant über die Grundlagen der Moral
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 18 January 2012, 6.15pm
Prof. Axel Honneth
Die Normativität der Sittlichkeit. Institutionelle Grundlagen von Autonomie
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 25 January 2012, 6.15pm
Prof. Rainer Forst
Zu einer Kritik der rechtfertigenden Vernunft
for further information: click here...

Wednesday, 8 February 2012, 6.15
Prof. Klaus Günther
Die Normativität des Rechts
for further information: click here...

Vorangegangene Ringvorlesungen des Exzellenzclusters: Hier...

Mittwoch, 11. April 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Mamadou Diawara, Dr. Ute Röschenthaler

Normwandel und die schillernde Macht der Medien im subsaharischen Afrika

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:



Zur Person

alt
Mamadou Diawara ist Professor für Historische Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Zuvor lehrte er an der Universität von Georgia in Athens/USA und war Gastprofessor für Geschichte und Ethnologie Afrikas an der Yale Universität. Seit 2004 ist er Stellvertretender Direktor des Frobenius-Instituts, dem ältesten ethnologischen Forschungsinstitut Deutschlands. Zudem ist er Direktor von Point Sud, Forschungszentrum für lokales Wissen in Bamako, Mali, und Principal Investigator in diesem Exzellenzcluster. Publikationen u.a.: L’empire du verbe - L’éloquence du silence. Vers une anthropologie du discours dans les groupes dits dominés au Sahel (Cologne: Rüdiger Köppe, 2003), und mit Ute Röschenthaler, Im Blick der Anderen (Brandes & Apsel, 2008).


Zur Person

alt
Ute Röschenthaler ist Privatdozentin für Ethnologie an der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz und wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin im Projekt „Medien in Afrika“ des Exzellenzclusters „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Seit 2009 übernahm sie Gastprofessuren in Berlin, Frankfurt und Bayreuth. Sie forscht seit 1987 in Kamerun und Nigeria und seit 2005 in Mali. Sie ist Autorin zahlreicher Aufsätze und mehrerer Bücher, darunter „Purchasing Culture: The Dissemination of Associations in the Cross River Region“ (2011, Africa World Press), Im Blick der Anderen (Hg. mit Mamadou Diawara, 2008, Brandes & Apsel) und „Fotofi eber: Bilder aus West- und Zentralafrika“ (Hg. mit Jürg Schneider und Bernhard Gardi, 2005, Christian Merian Verlag).

Zum Vortrag

Der Vortrag untersucht die Veränderung der Rolle von Medien und Werbung anhand ausgewählter Beispiele aus dem
subsaharischen Afrika von der vorkolonialen Zeit bis heute. Dabei zeigt sich, dass die Wirkung der Medien von den
jeweiligen Akteuren und ihren Interessen abhängt. Medien lassen sich zur Beförderung bestehender Machtverhältnisse
nutzen oder können diese unterwandern, zur Demokratisierung und Entwicklung oder zu deren Gegenteil verhelfen,
authentifi zierte Botschaften übermitteln oder als reine Propagandamaschine aufgefasst werden. Veränderungen im
Umgang mit Medien äußern sich in einem lokal wahrgenommenen Verlust etablierter Wortmacht und dem Auftreten einer
qualitativ neuen Dimension des Umgangs mit Sprache, des Anpreisens und der Performance mit dem menschlichen Körper.
Sie lassen sich auch durch den Wandel der gesellschaftlichen Ordnung erkennen, insbesondere dadurch, dass andere
Personen als zuvor – neue Politiker, neue Werber, neue Mediensprecher – nun die Medienarbeit ausführen, was dazu führen
kann, dass ihre Produkte, vor allem in Übergangsphasen, nicht mehr in derselben Weise als authentifi ziert wahrgenommen
werden.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 2. Mai 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Hartmut Leppin

Das christliche Kaisertum - Ein europäisches Paradox

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Im Christentum war das Kaisertum nicht vorgesehen, ja, die kaiserliche Stellung galt als unvereinbar mit dem Christentum. Und dennoch bekannte sich mit Konstantin dem Großen vor 1.600 Jahren ein römischer Kaiser zum Christentum. Der Vortrag geht der Frage nach, wie die paradoxe Verbindung von Kaisertum und Christentum zustande kommen und sich auf Dauer etablieren konnte. Dabei soll deutlich werden, dass es lange dauern sollte, bis Christentum und Kaisertum eine Verbindung  eingehen konnten, die scheinbar unlösbar war.

Zur Person

alt
Hartmut Leppin (*1963) wurde nach Studium der Geschichte und Klassischen Philologie in Marburg, Heidelberg, Pavia und Rom 1992 in Marburg mit einer  Dissertation über die soziale Stellung römischer Bühnenkünstler promoviert. 1995 erfolgte die Habilitation an der FU Berlin mit einer Arbeit über politische Vorstellungen in der spätantiken Geschichtsschreibung. Nach Stationen in Greifswald, Nottingham und Göttingen seit 2001 in Frankfurt am Main. Er ist Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters. Seine gegenwärtigen Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen auf der politischen Ideengeschichte der Antike sowie auf Christianisierungsprozessen in der spätantiken Gesellschaft. Neuere Publikationen: Theodosius der Große. Auf dem Weg zu einem christlichen Imperium, 2003 (it. und sp. Übersetzung 2008); The Church Historians I. Socrates, Sozomenus, and Theodoretus, in: G. Marasco (Hg.), Greek and Roman Historiography. Fourth to Sixth Century, 2003, 219-254; Power from Humility: Justinian and the Religious Authority of Monks, in: N. Lenski (Hg.), Shifting Frontiers (im Druck).

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 16. Mai 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Andreas Fahrmeir, Dr. Verena Steller

Wirtschaftstheorie, Normsetzung und Herrschaft: Freihandel, „Rule of Law“ und das Recht des Kanonenboots

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Das britische Empire des 19. Jahrhunderts ruhte auf drei Säulen: Freihandel, Rechtsstaatlichkeit und einer weltweit einsatzbereiten Marine. Was so problemlos klingt, dass es manchen wieder als Rezept für moderne Imperien zu taugen scheint, bezeichnet ein komplexes Wechselverhältnis zwischen Normen und Praktiken. Beide konnten ihre Herkunft aus spezifi sch britischen Erfahrungen nicht verleugnen, galten jedoch als universal anwendbar. Der Vortrag beschäftigt sich anhand verschiedener Beispiele mit den Aushandlungsprozessen, die aus dieser strukturellen Konfrontation zwischen universalen Ordnungsvorstellungen und lokalen Traditionen erwuchsen.

Zur Person
alt
Andreas Fahrmeir ist Inhaber der Professur für Neuere Geschichte unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des 19. Jahrhunderts am Historischen Seminar der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. 1997 wurde er in Cambridge promoviert und arbeitete im Anschluss am Deutschen Historischen Institut London. 2002 habilitierte sich Prof. Fahrmeir an der Goethe-Universität und war dort bis 2004 Heisenberg-Stipendiat der DFG. Von 2004 bis 2006 hatte er die Professur für Europäische Geschichte des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts an der Universität zu Köln inne. Jüngste Veröffentlichungen: Revolutionen und Reformen: Europa 1789-1850. München 2010; Citizenship: The Rise and Fall of a Modern Concept. New Haven/London 2007.

Zur Person

alt

Verena Steller ist Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin im Projekt zur „Herausbildung normativer Wirtschaftsordnungen“ im Exzellenzcluster. Nach dem Studium der Geschichte, Romanistik und Kommunikationswissenschaft in Bochum und Paris (Maîtrise, Paris IV-Sorbonne) wurde sie 2009 mit einer Arbeit zur Kulturgeschichte der Diplomatie an der Ruhr-Universität Bochum promoviert. Zu ihren Publikationen
gehören: Diplomatie von Angesicht zu Angesicht. Diplomatische Handlungsformen in den deutsch-französischen Beziehungen 1870-1919. Paderborn 2011; The Power of Protocole: On the Mechanisms of Symbolic Action in Diplomacy in Franco-German Relations,  1871-1914, in: Mößlang, Markus; Riotte, Torsten (Hrsg.), The Diplomats‘ World: The Cultural History of Diplomacy 1815-1914. Oxford (u.a.) 2008, 195-228.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 23. Mai 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Jussen

Plädoyer für eine Ikonologie der Geschichtswissenschaft - Beobachtungen zur bildlichen Formierung historischen Denkens

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Die Geschichtswissenschaft bedient das historische Wissen ihrer Leser nicht nur mit Texten, sondern auch mit Bildern. Seit den Anfängen der Disziplin sind viele  Geschichtsbücher – vom Handbuch bis zum Schulbuch – bebildert. Der Umgang mit Bildern und Texten ist allerdings sehr verschieden. Während der Text streng methodisch kontrolliert ist, ist die Bebilderung eher eine Angelegenheit des Erfahrungswissens oder der Intuition, liegt oft sogar weitgehend oder ganz in der Hand der Verlage. Diese eingespielte Praxis ist mehr als fahrlässig, denn gerade die Bebilderung eines Geschichtsbuches hat besonders starken Einfluss auf die historische Vorstellungskraft des Publikums. Die kaum je diskutierten Bebilderungsreservoirs der Geschichtswissenschaft schleppen über Jahrzehnte Altlasten weiter, die oft in den Texten längst beseitigt sind, und sie sind stark abhängig von nationalen politischen Kulturen. Der Vortrag diskutiert die Probleme eines kaum kontrollierten geschichtswissenschaftlichen Bildgebrauchs. Er plädiert für eine umfassende methodische Kontrolle und für eine disziplingeschichtliche Aufarbeitung des Bildgebrauchs – eine Ikonologie der eigenen Disziplingeschichte.

Zur Person

alt
Bernhard Jussen ist Professor für Mittelalterliche Geschichte an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Er war zuvor Professor in Bielefeld und wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte in Göttingen, nahm Gastprofessuren wahr an der University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, und an der École Normale Supérieure in Paris, war Fellow am Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin und Visiting Scholar am Art History Department der Harvard University. Im Jahr 2007 erhielt er den Leibniz Preis der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 30. Mai 2012, 18 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Luise Schorn-Schütte

Was ist Wandel „normativer Ordnungen“ im Europa des 16. / 17. Jahrhunderts?

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ15

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Die Entstehung und der Wandel von Normen sind in einer historischen Analyse unter Verwendung des methodischen Instruments des „Rechtfertigungsnarrativs“ erfassbar. Dabei lässt sich für die europäische Frühe Neuzeit feststellen, dass unter der Fülle auch gegensätzlicher Varianten bestimmte argumentative Grundmuster eine gemeinsame Rekursmöglichkeit boten. Eine wichtige Rolle nimmt hierbei die intensivierte „Verzahnung“ von Religion und Politik durch die Reformation ein. Ausgewählte Fallbeispiele zeigen, dass der Streit um Normen oft als Streit um Begriffe ausgeführt wurde, Normwandel und Begriffswandel hängen somit eng zusammen. Von zentraler Bedeutung war aber auch die Stellung der jeweils beteiligten Institutionen. Für beide Aspekte bietet die Perspektive auf den gesamteuropäischen Horizont aufschlussreiche Erkenntnisse.

Zur Person

alt
Luise Schorn-Schütte ist Professorin für Neuere Allgemeine Geschichte unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Frühen Neuzeit an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Mitgliedschaften in einer Vielzahl von Vereinigungen, in der Zeit von 2004 bis 2010 Vizepräsidentin der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft. Jüngste Veröffentlichungen:
Geschichte Europas in der Frühen Neuzeit. Studienhandbuch 1500-1789, Paderborn 2009; Konfessionskriege und europäische Expansion. Europa 1500-1648, München 2010; (als Herausgeberin), Intellektuelle in der Frühen Neuzeit, Berlin 2010.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 6. Juni 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter

Frauenrechte, religiöseWiedererweckung und postkoloniale Identitäten Herausbildung moderner Geschlechterordnungen in der islamischen Welt

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Seit Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts sind die Geschlechterordnungen weltweit in Bewegung geraten, haben sich national und transnational Bewegungen herausgebildet, die die Gleichheit zwischen Männern und Frauen anstreben, aber auch Gegenbewegungen, die Geschlechterdifferenz als Ausdruck einer natürlichen oder göttlichen Ordnung verteidigen und Frauen primär auf die Rolle von Müttern und Ehefrauen beschränken möchten. Während die Idee der Geschlechtergleichheit mittlerweile von den Vereinten Nationen festgeschrieben wurde und eine Konvention gegen die Eliminierung jeglicher Art von Diskriminierung gegen Frauen von fast allen Staaten unterzeichnet wurde, haben vor allem in islamischen Gesellschaften Stimmen an Einfl uss gewonnen, die Geschlechtergleichheit als unislamisch ablehnen. Mehr noch, sie glauben, der Westen nutze den Gleichheitsdiskurs als Waffe gegen die islamischen Gesellschaften, zerstöre ihre Kultur und re-kolonisiere sie gewissermaßen. Am Beispiel Indonesiens, Ägyptens und des Irans sollen die Debatten um Gender, Islam und die Formierung postkolonialer Ordnungen nachvollzogen werden.

Zur Person

alt
Susanne Schröter ist Professorin für „Ethnologie kolonialer und postkolonialer Ordnungen“ an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und leitet die Doktorandengruppe „Kulturelle und politische Transformationen in der islamischen Welt“. Bis 2008 war sie Inhaberin des Lehrstuhls für Südostasienkunde an der Universität Passau. Sie ist u.a. Präsidentin der „European Association for Southeast Asian Studies”, Vorstandsmitglied des „Deutschen Orient Instituts“ und des „International Centre for Aceh and Indian Ocean Studies“. Ihre Forschungsinteressen sind: Säkularismus und Postsäkularismus, Konstruktionen kollektiver Identitäten, Gender und Sexualität sowie Integration und Diversität in pluralen Gesellschaften. Jüngste Publikationen enthalten folgende Herausgeberschaften: Gender and Islam in Southeast Asia. Cultural dynamics between religious revivalism and women’s rights movements. Leiden: Brill, 2012;  Geschlechtergerechtigkeit durch Demokratisierung? Transformationen und Restaurationen von Genderverhältnissen in der islamischen
Welt. Bielefeld: Transcript, 2012.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

3. Februar 2011, 16.15 Uhr

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple

Die Moral der Gleichheit: Jean d‘Alembert zwischen moderater und radikaler Aufklärung

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Zum Vortrag

Jean d‘Alembert – bis 1759 mit Denis Diderot zusammen Hauptherausgeber der französischen Encyclopédie und einer der führenden mathematischen Wissenschaftler des 18. Jahrhunderts – skizzierte in seinen philosophischen Schriften unter dem Titel der „Morale“ eine genealogisch aufgebaute Konzeption gesellschaftlicher Normen, in deren Zentrum die Spannung zwischen Erfahrungen der Ungleichheit und der Norm der Gleichheit steht. D‘Alembert, dessen schriftstellerisches Handeln offene politische Radikalität in aller Regel vermied, gab damit – zumal mit Blick auf ökonomische Gleichheit – Stichworte für eine Kritik der Gesellschaft des Ancien Régime, die deren Rahmen sprengte. Der Vortrag sucht d‘Alemberts im deutschsprachigen Raum wenig rezipierte Position zu rekonstruieren und im Spektrum der Philosophie der Aufklärung zu verorten.

Zur Person


Prof. Dr. Moritz EppleMoritz Epple ist Leiter der Arbeitsgruppe Wissenschaftsgeschichte am Historischen Seminar der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. Prof. Epples Forschungsinteressen gelten der Geschichte der mathematischen Wissenschaften des 18. bis 20. Jahrhunderts im wissenschaftlichen, kulturellen und politischen Zusammenhang, u. a. der Rolle der mathematischen Wissenschaften in der europäischen Aufklärung, den Mathematisierungsprozessen in modernen Gesellschaften, und den Beziehungen zwischen Naturwissenschaft und Krieg. Neuere Publikationen: Jüdische Mathematiker in der deutschsprachigen akademischen Kultur (Hrsg. zusammen mit Birgit Bergmann), 2008; Science as Cultural Practice. Vol. 1: Cultures and Politics of Research from the Early Modern Period to the Age of Extremes (Hrsg. zusammen mit Claus Zittel), im Erscheinen; Science as Cultural Practice. Vol. 2: Modernism in the Sciences (Hrsg. zusammen mit Falk Müller), im Erscheinen.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 13. Juni 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Moritz Epple

Die Moral der Gleichheit: Jean d‘Alembert zwischen moderater und radikaler Aufklärung

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Jean d‘Alembert – bis 1759 mit Denis Diderot zusammen Hauptherausgeber der französischen Encyclopédie und einer der führenden mathematischen Wissenschaftler des 18. Jahrhunderts – skizzierte in seinen philosophischen Schriften unter dem Titel der „Morale“ eine genealogisch aufgebaute Konzeption gesellschaftlicher Normen, in deren Zentrum die Spannung zwischen Erfahrungen der Ungleichheit und der Norm der Gleichheit steht. D‘Alembert, dessen schriftstellerisches Handeln offene politische Radikalität in aller Regel vermied, gab damit – zumal mit Blick auf ökonomische Gleichheit – Stichworte für eine Kritik der Gesellschaft des Ancien Régime, die deren Rahmen sprengte. Der Vortrag sucht d‘Alemberts im deutschsprachigen Raum wenig rezipierte Position zu rekonstruieren und im Spektrum der Philosophie der Aufklärung
zu verorten.

Zur Person

alt
Moritz Epple ist Leiter der Arbeitsgruppe Wissenschaftsgeschichte am Historischen Seminar der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. Prof. Epples  Forschungsinteressen gelten der Geschichte der mathematischen Wissenschaften des 18. bis 20. Jahrhunderts im wissenschaftlichen, kulturellen und politischen Zusammenhang, u. a. der Rolle der mathematischen Wissenschaften in der europäischen Aufklärung, den Mathematisierungsprozessen in modernen Gesellschaften, und den Beziehungen zwischen Naturwissenschaft und Krieg. Neuere Publikationen: Jüdische Mathematiker in der deutschsprachigen akademischen Kultur (Hrsg. zusammen mit Birgit Bergmann), 2008; Science as Cultural Practice. Vol. 1: Cultures and Politics of Research from the Early Modern Period to the Age of Extremes (Hrsg. zusammen mit Claus Zittel), im Erscheinen; Science as Cultural Practice. Vol. 2: Modernism in the Sciences (Hrsg. zusammen mit Falk Müller), im Erscheinen.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 20. Juni 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Dr. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann

Kosmopolitische Dynamik im Völkerrecht?

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Das klassische Völkerrecht, das sich aus der Rechtsgeschichte der Antike und seiner Neuinterpretation durch das Mittelalter über weite Strecken im theoretischen Rahmen der Naturrechtstradition bewegt hatte, durchläuft am Ende des Mittelalters und zu Beginn der Neuzeit eine theoretische Neuausrichtung, die bis heute von  Bedeutung ist. Am Beispiel der Beiträge der Schule von Salamanca soll deutlich gemacht werden, wie das neue Völkerrecht nicht nur neue normative Einsichten aufnimmt und entfaltet, sondern auch auf die zeitgenössische kosmopolitische Herausforderung reagiert, die sich mit der ambivalenten, realen Erfahrung der „Neuen Welt“ für die Debatten in Europa und weit darüber hinaus systematisch stellt.

Zur Person

alt
Matthias Lutz-Bachmann ist Professor für Philosophie, Mitglied des Direktoriums des Exzellenzclusters und Vizepräsident der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Er leitet innerhalb des Clusters die Forschungsgruppe zur Rechtsphilosophie der „Schule von Salamanca“ und arbeitet maßgeblich in der Projektgruppe zur Entwicklung der Theorie des „Post-Säkularismus“ mit. Schwerpunkte seiner Forschung liegen in der Philosophie des Mittelalters, der Politischen Philosophie, der Kritischen Theorie und der Religionsphilosophie. Neuere Veröffentlichungen: Metaphysik heute – Probleme und Perspektiven der Ontologie (Hrsg. zusammen mit Thomas M. Schmidt), 2007; Handlung und Wissenschaft. Die Epistemologie der praktischen Wissenschaften im 13. und 14. Jahrhundert (Hrsg. zusammen mit Alexander Fiodora), 2008; Krieg und Frieden im Prozess der Globalisierung (Hrsg. zusammen mit Andreas Niederberger), 2009.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 27. Juni 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Dr. Benjamin Steiner

Teilen und Herrschen - Afrika und die französische Kolonialadministration des Ancien Régime

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Mit dem Beginn der Alleinherrschaft Ludwigs XIV. wandelte sich nicht nur die Herrschaftsstruktur in Frankreich selbst, sondern auch das Verhältnis der königlichen Administration zur Welt. Afrika spielte in diesem Zusammenhang von Herrschaft und Kolonisation eine bislang wenig beachtete Rolle. Es wird gezeigt wie Frankreich seit den 1660er Jahren versuchte, eine Kolonialverwaltung aufzubauen, die sich insbesondere auf ausgedehnte Informationssysteme stützte. Der französische Staat legitimierte sich über eine geradezu zeremonielle Praxis der Information – Rechtfertigungsrituale –, die nicht nur in den engen Zirkeln der Macht, sondern auch in einer  sich herausbildenden Öffentlichkeit vollzogen wurden. Dass eine so geartete Herrschaftspraxis sich nicht unmittelbar in Afrika realisierte, macht ein Blick auf die Begegnungssituationen der Franzosen mit Afrikanern deutlich. Afrikaner traten hier nicht nur als selbstbewusste Akteure mit eigenen Interessen im transatlantischen Handelsraum auf, sondern stellten der kolonialen Praxis der Franzosen ein anderes, aber durchaus mit ähnlichen Methoden operierendes Herrschaftsbewusstsein entgegen. Die machiavellistische Devise des diviser pour régner, der in mancherlei Hinsicht die Herrschaftspraxis des Ancien Régime charakterisierte, wurde so in
Afrika auf eine ernste Probe gestellt.

Zur Person

alt
Benjamin Steiner leitet die Nachwuchsgruppe „Wissen und Information über Afrika“ im Exzellenzcluster. Studium der Mittelalterlichen, Neueren und Neuesten Geschichte und Philosophie an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU), Hiram College (Ohio), Université Paris IV (Sorbonne); Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Teilprojekt B1 „Schauplätze des Wissens“ (A. Brendecke) am
Sonderforschungsbereich 573 „Pluralisierung und Autorität in der Frühen Neuzeit“ (LMU); DAAD-Research Fellow am Warburg Institute in London; Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Teilprojekt C8 (U. Beck / M. Mulsow) des Sonderforschungsbereichs 536 „Reflexive Modernisierung“ (LMU).

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 4. Juli 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Kohl

Indigenität als normative politische Kategorie

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Mit der Verabschiedung der Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples vom 13. September 2007 haben die Vereinten Nationen den Begriff der Indigenität in den Rang einer normativen politischen Kategorie erhoben. Damit unterstellen sie den „indigenen Völkern“ Gemeinsamkeiten, deren Vorhandensein von Kultur- und Sozialanthropologen im Gefolge der Repräsentationsdebatte und der postkolonialen Kritik noch wenige Jahre zuvor heftig bestritten worden war. Im Vortrag wird anhand der neueren Geschichte der Indigenenbewegung der Frage nachgegangen, wie es zu dieser Essentialisierung gekommen ist. In diesem Zusammenhang soll auch erörtert werden, wie sich die in der Declaration ebenfalls behauptete „spirituelle Beziehung indigener Völker“ zu ihrem Land auf deren heutiges Selbstverständnis auswirkt.

Zur Person

alt
Karl-Heinz Kohl ist Professor für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und Direktor des dortigen Frobenius-Instituts. Seit 1975 verbrachte er verschiedene Feldforschungsaufenthalte in Ostindonesien, Neuguinea und Nigeria. Zuletzt sind erschienen: The End
of Anthropology? (Co-ed.), Wantage: Sean Kingston Publishing, 2011, und Der Kaiser und sein Forscher. Der Briefwechsel zwischen Wilhelm II. und Leo Frobenius (Mit-Hrsg.), Stuttgart: W. Kohlhammer, 2012.

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Mittwoch, 11. Juli 2012, 16 Uhr c.t.

Ringvorlesung des Exzellenzclusters

Dr. Stefanie Michels

Schutzherrschaft revisited - Kolonialismus aus afrikanischer Perspektive

Campus Westend, Casino 1.811

Video:

Audio:

Zum Vortrag

Die koloniale Ordnung konnte letztlich nur durch das „Argument“ der Gewalt gerechtfertigt werden. Der Vortrag zeigt dies am konkreten Fall: Duala/Kamerun 1884-1914. In einem Perspektivwechsel werden dazu die Normen der seit Jahrhunderten an der westafrikanischen Küste bestehenden Handelskontaktzonen vorgestellt ebenso wie die Motivationen und Visionen der „Kings and Chiefs of Cameroon“, als sie 1884 den so genannten „Schutzvertrag“ mit deutschen Kaufleuten und  Regierungsvertretern unterschrieben. In diesen Vertrag wurden viele Rechte der Duala schriftlich fixiert, die diese in der Folge verteidigten. Die unvereinbaren Widersprüche in den Ordnungsvorstellungen der Duala und der Deutschen wurden durch die seit 1911 umgesetzten Segregationspläne für Duala manifest. Ausweisungen aus Deutschland und die Exekution der wichtigsten Duala-Politiker werden im Vortrag als Ende des sukzessiven Ausschlusses der Duala als Menschen, denen Rechtfertigung geschuldet wird, gelesen.

Zur Person

alt
Stefanie Michels leitet die Nachwuchsgruppe „Transnationale Genealogien“ im Exzellenzcluster. Promoviert wurde sie 2003 an der Universität Köln mit einer Arbeit zur Konstruktion deutsch-kolonialer Macht im Crossrivergebiet Kameruns. Ihr Forschungsschwerpunkt liegt auf afrikanischer Geschichte, einschließlich der Geschichte der afrikanischen Diaspora und deutscher Kolonialgeschichte. Wichtigste Veröffentlichungen sind: Duala und Deutschland – verflochtene Geschichte: Die Familie Manga Bell und koloniale Beutekunst, hg. mit Jean-Pierre Félix Eyoum und Joachim Zeller (2011); Schwarze deutsche Kolonialsoldaten. Mehrdeutige Repräsentationsräume und früher Kosmopolitismus in Afrika (2009); Imagined Power Contested: Germans and Africans in the Upper Cross River Area of Cameroon
1887-1915 (2004).

Zum Veranstaltungsüberblick: Hier...

Lecture Series of the Cluster of Excellence Summer Semester 2012

Normativity and Historicity: Frankfurt Perspektives II

"Normativity and Historicity" marks an area of conflict. Nearly every normative order claims to be well justified as well as valid at any time and any place. Every ethnologically or historically inspired contemplation on the world works from the premis that each 'culture'or 'epoch' develops its own normative order, which can change more quickly or slowly. The Lecture Series is a continuation of the series of readings about Frankfurt Perspectives on Normativtiy that was begun with a philosophical-political scientific view on normativity.

Brochure: click here...

Poster (pdf): click here...

Programme:

11 April 2012, 4pm.
Normwandel und Medien im subsaharischen Afrika
Prof. Mamadou Diawara, Dr. Ute Röschenthaler
For further information: click here...

18 April 2012, 4pm
Mathematik vs. König - Herausbildung einer normativen Ordnung der Lebenswelt der altägyptischen Experten
Prof. Annette Warner
For further information: click here...

2 May 2012, 4pm
Das christliche Kaisertum
Ein europäisches Paradox
Prof. Hartmut Leppin
For further information: click here...

16 May 2012, 4pm.
Wirtschaftstheorie, Normsetzung und Herrschaft
Freihandel, »Rule of Law« und das Recht des Kanonenboots
Prof. Andreas Fahrmeir, Dr. Verena Steller
For further information: click here...

23 May 2012, 4pm
Plädoyer für eine Ikonologie der Geschichtswissenschaft
Prof. Bernhard Jussen
For further information: click here...

30 May 2012, 6.15pm
Was ist Wandel »normativer Ordnungen« im Europa des 16./17. Jahrhunderts?
HZ 15
Prof. Luise Schorn-Schütte
For further information: click here...

6 June 2012, 4pm
Die Herausbildung moderner Geschlechterordnungen in der islamischen Welt
Prof. Susanne Schröter
For further information: click here...

13 June 2012, 4pm
Die Moral der Gleichheit Jean d‘Alembert zwischen moderater und radikaler Aufklärung
Prof. Moritz Epple
For further information: click here...

20 June 2012, 4pm
Kosmopolitische Dynamik im Völkerrecht?
Prof. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann
For further information: click here...

27 June 2012, 4pm
Teilen und Herrschen
Afrika und die französische Kolonialadministration des Ancien Régime
Dr. Benjamin Steiner
For further information: click here...

4 July 2012, 4pm
Die Indigenenbewegung in den ehemaligen britischen Siedlerkolonien
Prof. Karl-Heinz Kohl
For further information: click here...

11 July 2012, 4pm
Schutzherrschaft revisited
Kolonialismus aus afrikanischer Perspektive
Dr. Stefanie Michels
For further information: click here...

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The formation of Normative Orders"


Headlines

„Frankfurter interdisziplinäre Debatte“. Frankfurter Forschungsinstitute laden zum Austausch über disziplinen-übergreifende Plattform ein

Die „Frankfurter interdisziplinäre Debatte“ ist ein Versuch des Dialogs zwischen Vertreter*innen unterschiedlicher wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen zu aktuellen Fragestellungen – derzeit im Kontext der Corona-Krise und u.a. mit Beiträgen von Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst und Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther. Seit Ende März 2020 ist die Onlineplattform der Initiative (www.frankfurter-debatte.de) verfügbar. Mehr...

Bundesministerin Karliczek gibt Startschuss für das neue Forschungsinstitut Gesellschaftlicher Zusammenhalt

In einer Pressekonferenz hat Bundesministerin Anja Karliczek am 28. Mai 2020 den Startschuss für das neue Forschungsinstitut Gesellschaftlicher Zusammenhalt (FGZ) gegeben. Mit dabei waren Sprecherin Prof. Nicole Deitelhoff (Goethe-Uni, Normative Orders), sowie der Geschäftsführende Sprecher Prof. Matthias Middell (Uni Leipzig) und Sprecher Prof. Olaf Groh-Samberg (Uni Bremen). Nun kann auch das Frankfurter Teilinstitut seine Arbeit aufnehmen. Mehr...

Upcoming Events

Bis Ende September 2020

In der Goethe-Universität finden mindestens bis Ende September 2020 keine Präsenzveranstaltungen statt. Das Veranstaltungsprogramm des Forschungsverbunds "Normative Ordnungen" wird ebenfalls bis auf Weiteres ausgesetzt.

29. Mai 2020, 18.30 Uhr

Virtual Workshop on the Political Turn(s) in Criminal Law Thinking: Gustavo Beade: The Voice of the Polity in the Criminal Law: A Liberal Republica. More...

-----------------------------------------

Latest Media

Krise und Demokratie

Mirjam Wenzel im Gespräch mit Rainer Forst
Tachles Videocast des Jüdischen Museum Frankfurt

Normative Orders Insights

... with Nicole Deitelhoff

New full-text Publications

Burchard, Christoph (2019):

Künstliche Intelligenz als Ende des Strafrechts? Zur algorithmischen Transformation der Gesellschaft. Normative Orders Working Paper 02/2019. More...

Kettemann, Matthias (2020):

The Normative Order of the Internet. Normative Orders Working Paper 01/2020. More...