Frankfurt Lectures

Frankfurt Lecture I: Charles Larmore

Charles Larmore: Vernunft und Subjektivität

2 and 3 November, 7 - 10pm
Goethe University Frankfurt/Main / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ6


Lecture I: Vernunft
Monday 2 November 2009



Lecture II: Subjektivität
Tuesday 3 November 2009

 

Charles Larmore

Charles LarmoreHaving formerly taught at Columbia University and at the University of Chicago, Charles Larmore is now the W. Duncan MacMillan Family Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at Brown University.  His work is centered in the areas of moral and political philosophy, though he has also written on the nature of the self and on various topics in metaphysics and epistemology.  Among his most recent books are Les pratiques du moi (2004), for which he received the Grand Prix de Philosophie from the Académie Française, and The Autonomy of Morality (2008).

W. Duncan MacMillan Family Professor in the Humanities
Professor of Philosophy
Brown University
54 College Street
Providence, Rhode Island 02912

Areas of specialization:

Moral and political philosophy, History of philosophy (17th – 20th centuries)

Complete CV: click here (pdf)

Frankfurt Lectures allg.

Zu den Frankfurt Lectures wird jeweils ein international herausragender Forscher eingeladen, in zwei aufeinander folgenden Vorlesungen einen bestimmten Aspekt der Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen auf eine theoretisch innovative und zeitdiagnostisch prägnante Art und Weise zu bearbeiten.

Vergangene Veranstaltungen:

Frankfurt Lecture VI
Philip Pettit: Republikanische Gerechtigkeit und Demokratie
30. und 31. Januar 2012

Frankfurt Lecture V
Martti Koskenniemi: International Law and Empire: Historical Lessons
9. und 10. Mai 2011

Frankfurt Lecture IV
Jonathan Israel: Philosophy and Revolution in the late 18th Century: a Reinterpretation
8. und 9. November 2010

Frankfurt Lecture III
Frank I. Michelman: The Case of Liberty

17. und 18. Mai 2010

Frankfurt Lecture II
Nancy Fraser: The Crisis of Capitalism

19. und 20. April 2010

Frankfurt Lecture I
Charles Larmore: Vernunft und Subjektivität

2. und 3. November 2009

 

Frankfurt Lecture II: Nancy Fraser

Nancy Fraser: The Crisis of Capitalism

19 and 20 April 2010, 7pm
Goethe University Frankfurt/Main / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3


Monday, 19 April 2010
Lecture I: Marketization, Social Protection, Emancipation



Tuesday, 20 April 2010
Lecture II: Ambivalences of Emancipation

Nancy  FraserFraser’s analysis of the crisis of capitalism builds upon the theory of the economist and social theorist Karl Polanyi (“The Great Transformation”, 1944), augmenting Polanyi’s thesis of a double movement of marketization and social protections with a third axis of social struggles: emancipation. This threefold movement forms the core of her theoretical reflections which cast the current crisis of capitalist societies in a new light.

Nancy Fraser

Nancy Fraser is the Henry and Louise A. Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics and at the New School for Social Research in New York. She currently holds a “Blaise Pascal International Research Chair” at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris.

 

Frankfurt Lecture III: Frank I. Michelman

Frank I. Michelman: The Case of Liberty

17 and 18 May 2010, 7pm
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3


Monday, 17 May 2010

Lecture I: Liberty, Liberties, and "Total Freedom"

Tuesday, 18 May 2010

Lecture II: Contract versus Common Ground?

 

Prof.   Michelman

The Lectures will deal with themes of contract, consensus, and ethical value – and the interplay among these themes – in the justification of constitutional-democratic political regimes. They will question whether any firm differentiation can be maintained between contract-based and value-based orders of justification. They will frame this question through a close consideration of differing approaches to the definition, or conception, of constitutionally protected liberty represented by works of John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin.

Frank I. Michelman

Frank I. Michelman is Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard University, where he has taught since 1963. He is the author of Brennan and Democracy  (1999), and has published widely in the fields of constitutional law and theory, property law and theory, local government law, and general legal theory. Professor Michelman is a past President of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2005, he was awarded the American Philosophical Society’s Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the United States Association of Constitutional Law and of the National Advisory Board of the American Constitution Society. Over the past several years, he has maintained an active interest in matters of constitutionalism in South Africa.

Frankfurt Lectures

In each of the Frankfurt Lectures an outstanding international scholar is invited to address a particular aspect of the formation of normative orders in a theoretically innovative and topical manner in a series of two consecutive lectures.

 

Past events:

Frankfurt Lecture XI
Anne Peters: Rechte, Pflichten und Verantwortung in der post-humanistischen Konstellation
4 and 5 November 2019

Frankfurt Lecture X
Friedrich Kratochwil: Theorie der politischen Praxis?
24 and 25 October 2016

Frankfurt Lecture IX
Liam B. Murphy: Private Law and Public Illusion
2 and 3 May 2016

Frankfurt Lecture VIII
James Scott: The Late-Neolithic Multi-species Re-settlement Camp and the Earliest States
1 and 2 June 2015

Frankfurt Lecture VII
R. Jay Wallace: Bilateral Morality
1 and 2 July 2013

Frankfurt Lecture VI
Philip Pettit: Distinguishing Justice and Democracy
30 and 31 January 2012

Frankfurt Lecture V
Martti Koskenniemi: International Law and Empire: Historical Lessons

9. und 10. Mai 2011

Frankfurt Lecture IV
Jonathan Israel: Philosophy and Revolution in the late 18th Century: a Reinterpretation

8. und 9. November 2010

Frankfurt Lecture III
Frank I. Michelman: The Case of Liberty

17. und 18. Mai 2010

Frankfurt Lecture II
Nancy Fraser: The Crisis of Capitalism

19. und 20. April 2010

Frankfurt Lecture I
Charles Larmore: Vernunft und Subjektivität

2. und 3. November 2009

Philosophy and Revolution in the late 18th Century: a Reinterpretation

8 and 9 November 2010
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3

Montag, 8 November 2010, 19 pm

Lecture I: The late 18th century's Curious Idea that Philosophy caused the French Revolution

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Tuesday, 9 November 2010, 19 pm

Lecture II: The Enlightenment's Quarrel over Basic Human Rights

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Plakat Frankfurt Lectures IVAlthough it seems strange to us today, it was common in the years around 1790 for philosophers sympathetic to the French Revolution to speak of it as the realization of ' modern philosophy'. When examined, this perception can be seen to possess appreciable cultural and political significance. What was meant was that modern philosophy, considered in all its aspects implied a vast mobilization of intellectual and cultural impulses and these could be seen as having provided the mental apparatus that engineered the vast transformation political, social and legal that Europe and the entire world was undergoing. ' Die französische Revolution das Werk der Philosophie, aber was für ein Sprung von dem cogito, ergo sum bis zum ersten Erschallen des à la Bastille im Palais Royal. ' Given Lichtenberg's approach to scientific and philosophical questions, we may presume that he meant by this that it needed a shift to a systematically rational view of reality on many levels for human ideals and needs to come to be expressed and legislated for in the way that transpired in 1789. Thinking in terms of basic human rights was obviously one such dimension; another was the virtual destruction of confessional and theological differences as a meaningful divide between humans. But the most important change was the idea that the state exists to promote the interests of the majority conceived as equals. 'What a development! ', exclaimed Wekhrlin, in 1791: the torch of philosophy has finally been taken up in society and the 'rights of reason and of Man' transferred to the sphere of reality. 'The true principles of society have been researched and aufgeklärt', and the public understanding has been brought to grasp 'the general good'. In short, the century of the Enlightenment was one in which human life had ceased to be the plaything of politics and religion!' With the public sphere, freedom of the press and the Revolution, humanity had become, or so it briefly seemed, the sphere of 'reason'.

Jonathan Israel

Jonathan Israel worked in the early part of his career mainly on Spanish, Spanish American and Dutch history. From 1985 to 2000 he held the chair in Dutch History at University College London. Since 1993, he has devoted his efforts mainly to the study of the European Enlightenment in its intellectual context and in relation to social and political developments. Since January 2001 he has been professor fo Modern History at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. His most recent book is A Revolution of the Mind. Radical Enlightenment and the Intellectual origins of Modern Democracy (Princeton, 2010).

 

 

Frankfurt Lectures - List

In each of the Frankfurt Lectures an outstanding international scholar is invited to address a particular aspect of the formation of normative orders in a theoretically innovative and topical manner in a series of two consecutive lectures.

Past events:

Frankfurt Lecture IX
Liam B. Murphy: Private Law and Public Illusion
2 and 3 May 2016

Frankfurt Lecture VIII
James Scott: The Late-Neolithic Multi-species Re-settlement Camp and the Earliest States
1 and 2 June 2015

Frankfurt Lecture VII
R. Jay Wallace: Bilateral Morality
1 and 2 July 2013

Frankfurt Lecture VI
Philip Pettit: Distinguishing Justice and Democracy
30 and 31 January 2012

Frankfurt Lecture V
Martti Koskenniemi: International Law and Empire: Historical Lessons

9. und 10. Mai 2011

Frankfurt Lecture IV
Jonathan Israel: Philosophy and Revolution in the late 18th Century: a Reinterpretation

8. und 9. November 2010

Frankfurt Lecture III
Frank I. Michelman: The Case of Liberty

17. und 18. Mai 2010

Frankfurt Lecture II
Nancy Fraser: The Crisis of Capitalism

19. und 20. April 2010

Frankfurt Lecture I
Charles Larmore: Vernunft und Subjektivität

2. und 3. November 2009

International Law and Empire: Historical Lessons

9 and 10 May 2011, 7.15 pm
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a. M. / Campus Westend / Hörsaalzentrum / HZ3

Monday, 9 May 2011, 7.15 pm

Lecture I: Empires of Private Right 1500-1606

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Tuesday, 10 May 2011, 7.15 pm

Lecture II: Empires of Public Power 1625-1914

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Both lectures are concerned with the role of private and public law as instruments of global exercise of power. Historically power was not only exercised in the form of national sovereignty, but also always in the form of private law of ownership and of contract. The lectures are going to show that global exercise of power is still dependent on both forms. However, the function of private law to provide global order lacks attention.

Martti Koskenniemi

Martti Koskenniemi is one of the leading international law theorists. He is the director of the Erik-Castrén-Institute for International Law and Human Rights at the University of Helsinki.

Picture gallery:

Frankfurt Lecture VI: Philip Pettit

“Distinguishing Justice and Democracy“

30 January 2012
"Republican Justice and Democracy"

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31 January 2012
"Prioritizing Justice and Democracy"

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Audio:

Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum


Justice is not the only virtue of political institutions; legitimacy is just as important. And it is democracy, not justice, that establishes institutional legitimacy. Or at least this is so, on a republican conception of democracy. Political institutions may be more just and less democratic, less just and more democratic. So which value is the more important? In a political theory addressed to citizens as the makers of institutions, democracy enjoys an important priority.

Philipp Pettit is L.S.Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University, where he teaches philosophy and political theory. Among his books are The Common Mind  (1996), Republicanism (1997), The Economy of Esteem (2004), with G.Brennan; Made with Words (2008); A Political Philosophy in Public Life, with JL Marti (2010); and Group Agency (2011) with C. List. Common Minds: Themes from the Philosophy of Philip Pettit, ed G.Brennan et al, appeared from OUP in 2007. Professor Pettit is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as of academies in his two countries of citizenship: Ireland and Australia. His book On the People’s Terms is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. It is based on the 2009 Albertus Magnus Lectures in Cologne, and the 2010 Seeley lectures in Cambridge.

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The formation of Normative Orders"

Poster (pdf): here...

Picture galery:

 

Frankfurt Lectures allg.

In each of the Frankfurt Lectures an outstanding international scholar is invited to address a particular aspect of the formation of normative orders in a theoretically innovative and topical manner in a series of two consecutive lectures.

Past events:

Frankfurt Lecture VI
Philip Pettit: Distinguishing Justice and Democracy
30 and 31 January 2012

Frankfurt Lecture V
Martti Koskenniemi: International Law and Empire: Historical Lessons

9. und 10. Mai 2011

Frankfurt Lecture IV
Jonathan Israel: Philosophy and Revolution in the late 18th Century: a Reinterpretation

8. und 9. November 2010

Frankfurt Lecture III
Frank I. Michelman: The Case of Liberty

17. und 18. Mai 2010

Frankfurt Lecture II
Nancy Fraser: The Crisis of Capitalism

19. und 20. April 2010

Frankfurt Lecture I
Charles Larmore: Vernunft und Subjektivität

2. und 3. November 2009

Frankfurt Lectures VII: R. Jay Wallace

Bilateralität in der Moral

R. Jay Wallace

Lecture I: Die Grundzüge bilateraler Normativität

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Lecture II: Anspruch, Unrecht und Anforderung

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Campus Westend/Hörsaalzentrum/HZ3

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster: "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Plakat (pdf): Hier...

Einem vielversprechenden Ansatz zufolge geht es in der Moral um eine besondere Art von zwischenmenschlichen Beziehungen. Genauer gesagt, befähigt uns das Einhalten moralischer Normen dazu, mit anderen Personen auf der Grundlage gegenseitiger Achtung umzugehen. Die moralische Normativität ist demnach eine bilaterale, insofern sie mit Anforderungen zu tun hat, die auf die Ansprüche anderer Individuen zurückgehen. Ziel der Vorlesungen wird es sein, einige wichtige Voraussetzungen dieses bilateralen Verständnisses der Moral herauszuarbeiten und kritisch zu überprüfen.

R. Jay Wallace ist Professor für Philosophie an der University of California, Berkeley. Sein Schwerpunkt ist die Moralphilosophie.

Vortragssprache Deutsch

Zum Artikel: Hier...

Bildergalerie:

Frankfurt Lectures VII: R. Jay Wallace

Bilateral Morality

R. Jay Wallace

Lecture 1: The Basic Elements of Bilateral Normativity

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Lecture 2: Claims, Wrongs, and Moral Demands

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Campus Westend/Hörsaalzentrum/HZ 3

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The formation of Normative Orders"

Poster (pdf): here...


A promising approach to morality emphasizes its connection to a special kind of interpersonal relation. According to this approach, by complying with moral norms, we are able to relate to others on a basis of mutual respect. Moral normativity is bilateral or relational, insofar as it involves demands that are traceable to the claims or entitlements of other individuals. The goal of the lectures will be to identify and assess some of the most important elements in this bilateral approach to the moral domain.

R. Jay Wallace is professor of philosophy at the University of Califormia, Berkeley. He works in moral philosophy. Prof. Wallace's interests extend to all parts of the subject (including its history), and to such allied areas as political philosophy, philosophy of law, and philosophy of action.

Lecture in German

Article: click here...“

Picture Gallery:


The Late-Neolithic Multi-species Re-settlement Camp and the Earliest States


Prof. Dr. James Scott
(Yale University)

1 and 2 June 2015, 6 pm

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum, HZ4 und HZ5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture 1, 1 June 2015, 6 pm (HZ 4):

The Domestication of Fire, Animals, Grain and….Us

All of the presumed civilizational steps required for state-making: agriculture, domestic animals, sedentism, towns and substantial commerce were in place several millennia before anything we might call a “state” appears in the historical record. Why the long delay? So long as other, broader subsistence options were open, Homo sapiens avoided substantial reliance on agriculture because of disease, drudgery, and risk. The creation of the state requires confinement, unfree labor and a cereal grain as a tax crop. Hence there are no cassava, sweet potato, banana, lentil, chick pea states, only millet, wheat, barley, rice and maize states. How the hegemony of these grains transformed our culture, our society, the domus and our bodies is part of this story.

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Lecture 2, 2 June 2015 (HZ 5):

The Early State: its Fragility and the Golden Age of “Barbarians”

The early state, given its fragility, was a miracle of statecraft and usually short-lived. It required cobbling together one or a few adjacent, rich, loess or alluvial bottom lands, assembling a cultivating population and holding them in place. Slavery, wars for capture, and massive forced resettlement were among the techniques for keeping this “grain-and-manpower” module together and replenishing its population: techniques that frequently failed. All of the early states were surrounded by pastoralists, foragers, hunters, and swiddeners, many of whom were escapees from the grain core. These “raiding and trading barbarians”, were for many centuries the major restraint on the state, a sort of homeostatic regulator. Ultimately, however, by serving as mercenaries and delivering slaves to the grain core, they built the state.

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CV
James Scott, is the Sterling Professor of Political Science and Professor of Anthropology and is co-Director of the Agrarian Studies Program.  He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin.  His research concerns political economy, comparative agrarian societies, theories of hegemony and resistance, peasant politics, revolution, Southeast Asia, theories of class relations and anarchism.  His publications include The Moral Economy of the Peasant, Yale University Press, 1976, Domination and the Arts of Resistance, Yale University Press, 1985, Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance, Yale university Press 1980, Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed, Yale University Press, 1998; The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia, Yale University Press, 2008, and Two Cheers for Anarchism, Princeton University Press, 2013. He is a mediocre sheep breeder and bee-keeper in Connecticut.

 
Gallery:

  • Prof. Dr. James Scott, Yale University
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosphie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. Susanne Schröter, Professorin für Ethnologie an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"
  • Prof. Dr. James Scott, Yale University


Presented by:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

 

Private Law and Public Illusion

2 and 3 May 2016

Liam B. Murphy (New York University)

Lecture I: Artificial Morality

Lecture II: The Persistence of an Illusion

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, Hörsaalzentrum HZ6

In the public at large, property and contract law are commonly thought to reflect moral proprietary and
promissory rights. Contemporary philosophers are mostly skeptical about natural property rights, but not about promissory rights. I argue that contract and promise, no less than property, can only be justified instrumentally – by appeal to the social good that these conventional practices produce. The etiology of the tenacious and harmful public illusion that the law of the market reflects individual natural rights deserves investigation.
I argue that the inevitably deontological form of contract and property law plays a significant role in sustaining this illusion.

Liam B. Murphy ist Inhaber der Herbert Peterfreund Professur für Recht und Professor für Philosophie an der New York University.

 

Lecture I: Artificial Morality

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Lecture II: The Persistence of an Illusion

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Gallery:

  • Liam B. Murphy, New York University
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther, Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

 

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Frankfurt Lectures: Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)

24. bis 25. Oktober 2016

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend
Frankfurt am Main

Veranstalter:
Exzellenzcluster "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen"

Weitere Angaben folgen

Theorie der politischen Praxis?


24 - 25 Oktober 2016

Theorie der politischen Praxis?

Kritische Anmerkungen zum “practice turn” (24 October)
Kritische Anmerkungen zur “idealen Theorie” (25 October)

Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)

Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend
Frankfurt am Main

 

Video: Kritische Anmerkungen zum “practice turn”

Audio:

 

Video: Kritische Anmerkungen zur “idealen Theorie”

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  • Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther (Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther (Co-Sprecher des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen" und Professor für Rechtstheorie, Strafrecht und Strafprozessrecht der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann (Professor für Politikwissenschaft mit dem Schwerpunkt Außenbeziehungen westeuropäischer Staaten an der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Gunther Hellmann (Professor für Politikwissenschaft mit dem Schwerpunkt Außenbeziehungen westeuropäischer Staaten an der Goethe-Universität und Principal Investigator des Exzellenzclusters "Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen")
  • Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)
  • Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)
  • Prof. Dr. Friedrich Kratochwil (Professor em. für Internationale Beziehungen)

Presented by:
Cluster of Excellence "The Formation of Normative Orders"

Past Frankfurt Lectures: click here...

Rechte, Pflichten und Verantwortung in der post-humanistischen Konstellation

Frankfurt Lectures

4. und 5. November 2019, jeweils 18.15 Uhr

Rechte der Tiere und der Natur (am 4. November)
Pflichten, Verantwortung und künstliche Intelligenz (am 5. November)

Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)

Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Campus Westend, HZ3
Frankfurt am Main

Die Grenzen zwischen Tier, Mensch und Maschine verschwimmen zunehmend. Auch der Vorrang des Menschen, der im Begriff ist, den Planeten zu zerstören, wird hinterfragt. Ist es in dieser Konstellation sinnvoll und geboten, Tieren, Bergen, Flüssen und Wäldern Rechte zuzusprechen, wie Gerichte in Lateinamerika und Indien es tun? Was sind die praktischen Konsequenzen für unseren Umgang mit der Natur und mit Tieren, insbesondere jenen, die wir milliardenfach ausbeuten und töten? Sollten wir auf der anderen Seite, intelligenten Maschinen Rechtspflichten auferlegen? Könnte sich eine unbemannte Drohne selbst strafbar machen, wenn sie das humanitäre Völkerrecht verletzt? Müssen wir eine neue Rechtsgemeinschaft gründen, in der Menschen, Tiere und Cyborgs Platz haben?

Bildergalerie:

  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Forschungsverbunds „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst, Co-Sprecher des Forschungsverbunds „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“ und Professor für Politische Theorie und Philosophie der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
  • Prof. Dr. Stefan Kadelbach, Professor für Öffentliches Recht an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Forschungsverbunds „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. Stefan Kadelbach, Professor für Öffentliches Recht an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und Principal Investigator des Forschungsverbunds „Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen“
  • Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)
  • Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)
  • Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)
  • Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)
  • Prof. Dr. iur. Anne Peters, LL.M. (Harvard) (Direktorin am Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht in Heidelberg)

Video Lecture I

 

Video Lecture II

 

 

Veranstalter:
Forschungsverbund "Normative Ordnungen" an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main


Headlines

„Frankfurter interdisziplinäre Debatte“. Frankfurter Forschungsinstitute laden zum Austausch über disziplinen-übergreifende Plattform ein

Die „Frankfurter interdisziplinäre Debatte“ ist ein Versuch des Dialogs zwischen Vertreter*innen unterschiedlicher wissenschaftlicher Disziplinen zu aktuellen Fragestellungen – derzeit im Kontext der Corona-Krise und u.a. mit Beiträgen von Prof. Dr. Nicole Deitelhoff, Prof. Dr. Rainer Forst und Prof. Dr. Klaus Günther. Seit Ende März 2020 ist die Onlineplattform der Initiative (www.frankfurter-debatte.de) verfügbar. Mehr...

Bundesministerin Karliczek gibt Startschuss für das neue Forschungsinstitut Gesellschaftlicher Zusammenhalt

In einer Pressekonferenz hat Bundesministerin Anja Karliczek am 28. Mai 2020 den Startschuss für das neue Forschungsinstitut Gesellschaftlicher Zusammenhalt (FGZ) gegeben. Mit dabei waren Sprecherin Prof. Nicole Deitelhoff (Goethe-Uni, Normative Orders), sowie der Geschäftsführende Sprecher Prof. Matthias Middell (Uni Leipzig) und Sprecher Prof. Olaf Groh-Samberg (Uni Bremen). Nun kann auch das Frankfurter Teilinstitut seine Arbeit aufnehmen. Mehr...

Upcoming Events

Bis Ende September 2020

In der Goethe-Universität finden mindestens bis Ende September 2020 keine Präsenzveranstaltungen statt. Das Veranstaltungsprogramm des Forschungsverbunds "Normative Ordnungen" wird ebenfalls bis auf Weiteres ausgesetzt.

29. Mai 2020, 18.30 Uhr

Virtual Workshop on the Political Turn(s) in Criminal Law Thinking: Gustavo Beade: The Voice of the Polity in the Criminal Law: A Liberal Republica. More...

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Latest Media

Krise und Demokratie

Mirjam Wenzel im Gespräch mit Rainer Forst
Tachles Videocast des Jüdischen Museum Frankfurt

Normative Orders Insights

... with Nicole Deitelhoff

New full-text Publications

Burchard, Christoph (2019):

Künstliche Intelligenz als Ende des Strafrechts? Zur algorithmischen Transformation der Gesellschaft. Normative Orders Working Paper 02/2019. More...

Kettemann, Matthias (2020):

The Normative Order of the Internet. Normative Orders Working Paper 01/2020. More...